Quarterly Mags: 2009 2nd

Thermoforming
Quarterly®
SECOND QUARTER 2009
VOLUME 28 n NUMBER 2
Contents Contents
Thermoforming
Quarterly®
n
Departments
Chairman’s Corner x 2
Thermoforming in

the News x 4
The Business of

Thermoforming x 8
University News x
24
Thermoforming and Sustainability x
28

Page 24
n
Features
Industry Practice x
6

Letters to the Editor

Thermoforming 2.0 x
10

The Use of Regrind in Thermoforming

Page 10
Lead Technical Article x
14

Infrared Heat: A Simplified Approach – Part One

Featured ANTEC Article x
18

Polypropylene – Cup Conversion From Injection Molding to Thermoforming

nIn This Issue
2009 Thermoformer of the Year x5
Visit Us on the Web x26
2009 Editorial Calendar x 33
Sponsorship x36Page 5
A JOURNAL PUBLISHED EACH CALENDAR
QUARTER BY THE
THERMOFORMING DIVISION
OF THE SOCIETY OF PLASTICS ENGINEERS

Editor

Conor Carlin

(617) 771-3321
cpcarlin@gmail.com
Technical Editor

Barry Shepherd

(905) 459-4545 Ext. 229
Fax (905) 459-6746
bshep@shepherd.ca
Sponsorships

Laura Pichon

(847) 829-8124
Fax (815) 678-4248
lpichon@extechplastics.com
Conference Coordinator

Gwen Mathis

(706) 235-9298
Fax (706) 295-4276
gmathis224@aol.com
Thermoforming Quarterly® is published
four times annually as an informational
and educational bulletin to
the members of the Society of Plastics
Engineers, Thermoforming Division, and the
thermoforming industry. The name, “Thermoforming
Quarterly®” and its logotype,
are registered trademarks of the Thermoforming
Division of the Society of Plastics
Engineers, Inc. No part of this publication
may be reproduced in any form or by any
means without prior written permission of
the publisher, copyright holder. Opinions of
the authors are their own, and the publishers
cannot be held responsible for opinions or
representations of any unsolicited material.
Printed in the U.S.A.

Thermoforming Quarterly® is registered
in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
(Registration no. 2,229,747). x

Cover photo courtesy of
Barry Shepherd,
Shepherd Thermoforming.
2009 all rights reserved.
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 1

Thermoforming
Quarterly® Chairman’s Corner
Brian RayI
f you are like me, then you

are weary of all the negative news

flooding the airwaves and media

lately. Don’t get me wrong – I

have not put my head in the sand,

nor am I looking the other way.
Manufacturing has been a pillar of

this country for centuries, despite all

the challenges. One need only read
a history book to be reminded that
during WWII various manufacturing
plants were transformed from making
custom products one day to building

military equipment the next.

As a Harley Davidson enthusiast,

I recently toured one of their
manufacturing facilities. I saw a
video presentation about a 100-yearold
company that grew from building

a few motorcycles in a 10′ x 15′ shed

to a global motorcycle powerhouse.

As part of the video, I was reminded

of the many challenges that Harley

Davidson faced over the decades, yet
the company has continued to find
ways to flourish.

In mid-February we concluded our
winter Board of Directors’ meeting.
It was at this meeting that we began
intense discussion regarding the
annual Thermoforming Conference.

As the meetings continued, focus

on the conference intensified, until

we reached the conclusion that a
conference in September 2009 would

not provide our sponsors, exhibitors

or attendees with the high quality
product we are all accustomed to.

This was a difficult decision, but

in light of worsening economic

conditions, I have no doubt that the

Board of Directors acted correctly.
We will return to Milwaukee with a

Thermoforming Conference in 2010,

and I look forward to seeing all of
you there.

June is just around the corner,

and that means NPE. I have vivid
memories of this show as a young 15-
year-old high school student walking

the exhibit floor with my father. I

will never forget the distinct smell of
melting plastic at the entrance to each

hall. As a first-timer, I had no idea

what we were doing there or what to

expect. All I know is that by the end
of the day, I was carrying a frisbee,
a resin chair and a five-piece place
setting. I felt lost, and at subsequent
NPEs, I still got lost.

That will all change this year.

For the first time, the SPE

Thermoforming Division is
sponsoring a Thermoforming
Pavilion. Located in the West Hall,
Booth 119025, this area will allow

the Division to showcase both
thermoforming technologies and all
the educational efforts supported by
the Division. Several board members
and non-board members have taken
a very active role to ensure that the
pavilion is a success and the division
can grow its membership and overall
footprint within the plastics industry.
We are using this pavilion as an

opportunity to attract new sponsors,

exhibitors and attendees for the 2010

Thermoforming Conference and as a
highly visible platform to showcase
all that has been accomplished in
the world of thermoforming over the
years.

For those who are interested, there is

still time to sponsor a portion of the
pavilion with your corporate logo.

The cost is $2,500 and your company

banner will be positioned near one of
the technical areas within the pavilion

(Machinery, Processing or Materials).
If you are interested, please contact

me directly as soon as possible. With

this sponsorship, you will also be able

to distribute your company literature.

With over 70,000 attendees, the cost

comes out to be less than a nickel
per copy. I don’t know a marketing
manager that can pass up such a great
opportunity.

I want to thank you all again for
your continued support of the
Thermoforming Division. I look
forward to seeing many of you at

NPE. In fact, our good friends at

the Society of Plastics Industry –

Thermoforming Institute, will be

hosting a Thermoforming Reception

in the Pavilion on Tuesday, June 23,

2009 from 4pm – 6pm. This reception
is open to thermoformers and will
provide a great opportunity to
network and socialize.

Get involved with the sponsorship
of the pavilion and show your
support by telling the world how

thermoforming fits into today’s

manufacturing environment. x

Brian Ray
Chair

2 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Thermoforming
Quarterly® New Members
Luc Bosiers

Dow Chemical

H. H. Dowweg 5
Terneuzen 4542 NM
Jodie Burton

Tegrant
1401 Pleasant St.
De Kalb, IL 60115

Peter Clark

Grimm Brothers Plastic Corp.
One Quality Court
Wapello, IA 52563

Kamal Eldin Eisa, Sr.

Octal Petrochemicals
PO Box 383
P Code 217 Awqadain Salalah
Salalah 00217

Helen J. Fish

Prairie Packaging/Pactiv
7701 West 79th St.
Bridgeview, IL 60455

Milind M. Godbole

DevCorp Internatonal BSC(C)

Manama Center, Office #305

Entrance 2, Govt Avenue, Govt Ave Rd.
Manama 00316

Garfield Gosa, Jr.

RLR Industries
575 Discovery Place
Mableton, GA 30126

Bonita Groff

Placon Corporation
6096 McKee Rd.
Madison, WI 53719

Timothy Hamilton

Spartech
120 S. Central Ave., Suite 1700
Clayton, MO 63105

Tomoo Hirota

Sumitomo Chemical Co. LTD
2-1 Kitasode
Sodegaura City 00299-0295

Tom J. Kennedy

3 Mirick Lane
Wilbraham, MA 01095

S. Umesh Kumar
Plastech Engineers
3 Jawaharlai Nehru Rd.
Ekkaduthangal, Chennai 600 032

James A. Landgraf

15 Sunset St.
Keansburg, NJ 07734

Edward T. Livengood II

6225 Shelwin Ct.
Winston-Salem, NC 27106

Mahdy Mazhary Malayery

64 Bertram Dr.
Dundas, ON L9H 4T3

Michael Mast

ThermaForm LLC
1107 Naughton
Troy, MI 48083

Jason Mendofik

Tray-Pak Corporation
PO Box 14804
Reading, PA 19612-4804

Laurence Meylheuc

INSA
24 Boulevard De La Victoire
Strasbourg Alsace 67084

Anand Arun Modi

Plasticators
B/9-Nandkishore Indl Estate
Off Mahakali Caves Rd. Andheri (E)
Mumbai 400093

Brian M. Murphy

5463 Keystone Court

Plainfield, IL 60544

John K. Murphy

Tegrant, Alloyd Brands
1401 Pleasant St.
Dekalb, IL 60115

Gary Oberholtzer

Convatec
200 Headquarters Park Dr.
Skillman, NJ 08558-2624

Michael Parker

MGP Ingredients
200 Commercial St.
Atchison, KS 66002

Llewellyn Roberts

Plastic-Craft Products Corp.
PO Box K
744 West Nyack Rd.
West Nyack, NY 10994

Why Join?
® Why Not?
It has never been more important to be a member of your
professional society than now, in the current climate of change
and volatility in the plastics industry. Now, more than ever, the
information you access and the personal networks you create
can and will directly impact your future and your career.
Active membership in SPE – keeps you current, keeps you
informed, and keeps you connected.
The question really isn’t “why join?” but …
Brant E. Rouse

Dart Container Corporation
3120 1/2 Howell Rd., Bldg. 5
Mason, MI 48854

Moinuddin Sarker

Natural State Research Inc.
37 Brown House Rd. (2nd Floor)
Stamford, CTR 06902

Roger Saulce, Sr.

443 Notre Dame Est, Apt. 1
Montreal, QC H2Y 1C9

Ronald S. Schotland

Schotland Business Research
16 Duncan Lane
Skillman, NJ 08558

Richard A. Schwarz

Associated Packaging Technologies
1 Dickinson Dr., STE 100
Chadds Ford, PA 19317-9665

Blanchard Serge

Rue Des Epinettes
Torcy 77400

Justin Shen

Hong Zu Mould Enterprise Co., Ltd.
No. 4, Lane 24, Chun-An Street
Shu-Lin, Taipei 00238

John N. Shufflin

74 Pontiac St.
Oxford, MI 48371

Dale W. Thomas

10560 Boylston Dr.
Saint Ann, MO 63074

Chirag Tilva

GATECH/PTFE
335390 Georgia Tech Station
Atlanta, GA 30332

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 3

Thermoforming in the news
Dust to Dust:
Thermoformed

coffin made of

biodegradable
plastics

By MPW Staff
Published: January 28th, 2009

Although
biodegradable
plastics are
seeing greater
use in smaller
packaging
applications,
until now
thermoforming
of these for
large, thickwalled
parts from cut sheet has
been very limited. One processor,
Bauer, which usually serves the
automotive industry, has developed
the extrusion and thermoforming
processes sufficiently to now offer
biodegradable coffins formed from
the Arboblend material supplied by
Tecnaro GmbH (Ilsfeld-Auenstein,
also Germany).

Tecnaro takes lignin (a complex
polymer found in plant cell walls)
and compounds this with natural
fibres (flax, hemp or other fibers)
and natural additives to produce a
composite.

x

mpweditorial@cancom.com

Berry to
invest $80
million in new
thermoforming
operation

By Tony Deligio
Published: January 22nd, 2009

Berry Plastics (Evansville, IN)
will invest $80 million in building
and equipment for an expansion

of its thermoforming operations.

Startup is targeted for the first quarter
of 2010, and as yet, the company has
not settled on a site for the expansion,

but believes it will create 150 new

jobs. In a release, Jonathan Weinzapfel,
mayor of Evansville, IN, where Berry is
headquartered, said his city will “do all

that we can to ensure this new investment
and job creation happens in Evansville.”
Berry had already recently invested

$40 million dollars in Evansville, for
an expansion of its global headquarters

on Oakley Street and a new warehouse/
distribution center at the Evansville

Regional Airport, with those initiatives
resulting in 300 new jobs.

Berry’s in-house thermoforming
capabilities go back to 2001, and
they were expanded in 2003 with the
acquisition of Landis Plastics Inc.’s
five U.S. plants for $228 million.
More recently, Berry acquired certain
assets of Erie County Plastics Corp.,
a custom injection molder of plastics
packaging and components. Erie filed for
bankruptcy protection on Sept. 29, 2008.

Primarily through 21 acquisitions
starting in the ’90s, Berry has grown to
include nearly 14,000 employees and
66 U.S. manufacturing sites, as well as
operations in Mexico, Canada, Italy,
Belgium, and China. Berry is owned
by private equity investors, Apollo
Management L.P. and Graham Partners
Inc., which purchased the company in
2006. Berry’s management team also
holds a stake. x

tony.deligio@cancom.com

Thermoformer PWP
preparing to open
recycling plant

By Roger Renstrom, Plastics News Correspondent
Posted: March 17th, 2009

Food packaging thermoformer PWP
Industries is moving toward opening
an 80,000-square-foot in-house plastics
recycling facility in Davisville, W.Va.,

during the second quarter of 2009. The
site is less than 10 miles from a PWP

production site in Mineral Wells, W.Va.
An unidentified supplier is providing

the recycling equipment and technology

and, currently, is training PWP

employees.

“Recycling PET bottles will

allow PWP to increase its product

range containing post-consumer resin,
save energy, reduce carbon dioxide

emissions and keep plastic materials out

of landfills,” Ira Maroofian, president
and chief operating officer, said in a

statement.

Coca-Cola Recycling LLC of Atlanta
will be the primary supplier of recycled
PET flake that PWP will use as Food and
Drug Administration-compliant resin
for food packaging. The limited liability
company is a subsidiary of publicly
traded Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc., the
largest bottler of Coca-Cola products.

Phase one of the PWP project is
projected to have an annual capacity to
recycle 40 million pounds of flake and,
in the process, cut annual emission of
30,000 tons of carbon dioxide and reduce
annual energy requirements by 398
million kilowatt hours.

PWP says manufacturing of postconsumer-
resin PET uses about twothirds
less energy than production of
virgin PET.

Establishing the recycling facility is
part of a PWP company-wide initiative
called Earth’s Pack through which PWP
has introduced new packaging composed
of biodegradable and compostable
materials from agricultural scrap.

Vernon, Calif.-based PWP

thermoforms PET and polypropylene

for food packaging at plants in Vernon,
Mineral Wells and Abilene, Texas.

For energy conservation, builders of
the Davisville facility and an addition at
the Abilene site incorporated designs for
maximum natural lighting, high-energy
efficient lighting and on-off motionoccupancy
detectors. x

4 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

2009 Thermoformer of the Year
D
D
avid M. Bestwick was born
October 3, 1933 in Grove City,
Pennsylvania. Dave graduated from
Grove City College in 1957 with a degree
in Business.

Bestwick joined General
Fireproofing as a salesman in 1957.
He bought his first business, Business
Equipment and Supply and moved to
Reading, Pennsylvania in 1967, selling
the company to a partner in 1974.

David Bestwick, along with partners,

acquired the thermoforming operation of

W. R. Grace in 1975. Tray-Pak started
with eleven machines and thirty-six
employees, manufacturing cookie and
candy trays. In 1981, Dave bought his

partners’ shares and created a vision for
Tray-Pak that is followed today: focus
on what the customer needs and direct all
of your effort toward supplying a quality
solution in a timely and cost- effective
manner.

David Bestwick introduced HIPS
trays to the mushroom industry in 1977.
The transition from pulp to thermoformed
trays increased shelf life in the
supermarkets 30- 40%.

Dave has always maintained a
focus for Tray-Pak to support the
development of new materials and their
application in the marketplace. Tray-Pak
was involved in the early development
of CPET – dual ovenable trays in the
1980’s. Tray-Pak’s early involvement

David M. Bestwick
Tray-Pak Corporation
Reading, Pennsylvania

in sustainable packaging was further
enhanced in the mid-1990’s when they
were thermoforming recycled or postconsumer
PET. Tray-Pak continued to

stay in front of the sustainable industry,

co-presenting to the industry on
NatureWorks PLA material.

In the early 1980’s, under Dave’s
guidance, Tray-Pak began working
with customers to introduce new
designs created for customers to sell
more product. In 1982, Tray-Pak added
in-house tool fabrication through the
purchase of S. R. Schlegel. In 19911992,
along with Ben Franklin Partners,
Tray-Pak integrated their process into
CNC and Autocad Technology. Bi-
Color Clamshells were introduced and
Tray-Pak’s I-POPTM (Images Printed
on Plastic) put pre-printed sheet in the
marketplace in 1995. Tray-Pak’s Design
and New Product Development groups
added rapid-prototyping and digital
scanning to their in-house capabilities.
Twelve people now provide creative
solutions for a variety of industries.

Dave’s vision always challenged
his employees to look at new markets
and products to enhance the value of
Tray-Pak to its customer base. In 2000,
TPSource was added to support the needs
of captive thermoformers. It supplies
tools, materials, and tech support to
customer. In 2003, with the help of
the late Scott W. Bestwick, Tray-Pak
launched Fusion-Pak, a unique concept
that married the graphic capabilities
of printed board to the flexibility of
thermoformed packaging. Tray-Pak
utilized this platform for direct mail
programs earning users response rates in

excess of 20%. Tray-Pak was awarded

a 2009 American Design Award from
Graphic Design USA for this program.

David Bestwick has grown Tray-
Pak from 36 employees in 1975 to
over 250 dedicated employees today.
Operating 44 thermoforming machines
in nearly 200,000 square feet of
space, Tray-Pak offers custom design,
in-house tooling and engineering,
and automation expertise. Tray-Pak
converts a myriad of material types
including polystyrene, polypropylene,
HDPE, LPDE, PET, and PVC as well
as co-extruded and laminated materials.
Dave also directed Tray-Pak’s efforts
into markets such as food and food
service, automotive, consumer,
electronic, health and beauty, industrial,
medical, and pharmaceutical products.

Bestwick and Tray-Pak have
also received the 2002 Pennsylvania
Department of Commerce Award, the
2003 Ben Franklin Technology Partners
Grant for Economic Development, and
the 2007 Ben Franklin Technology
Innovation Award.

David Bestwick has served on the
Berks County Manufacturers Board of
Directors, the Ben Franklin Partners
at Lehigh University, and the Reading

YMCA Board of Trustees.
He is a member of the Society

of Plastics Engineers, Society of
Plastics Industry, and the Ben Franklin

Technology Group.

David Bestwick continues to serve
his community and support the growth
and the sustainability of the plastics
industry. x

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 5

Thermoforming

Industry Practice

Quarterly®

Letters to the Editor

Dear Sir:

I have just read the Industry Practice section in the
First Quarter 2009 Thermoforming Quarterly. While I agree
completely with the panel regarding the need for a clear,
documented understanding between the thermoformer and
the sheet extruder, I was surprised that the resin producer
was not included in this partnership. I was also surprised
by Mr. Siekierski’s point that the extruder should be the
one to take the responsibility for the decision about which
material should be used and how it should be extruded
without taking into consideration the liability that it places
on the extruder. Typically, the resin manufacturer is the one
to design a specific formula for an application. A combined
effort by the resin manufacturer, extruder, thermoformer, and
the customer is a must, especially in critical applications. If
the resin manufacturer has designed a particular resin and
has given the extruder, the thermoformer, and the customer
the technical specifications of the sheet with tested results
(and recommended this material for a particular application)
it allows all parties to be more comfortable making a
decision. Since the resin manufacturer has promoted a
product for an application, as long as all recommendations
regarding extrusion, thermoforming and tooling techniques
are followed, and the application fits the parameters of that
application, liability is placed squarely on the manufacturer
of the resin to ensure repeatability and performance. With
more and more sophisticated resins hitting the market, all
factors should be considered when designing a thermoformed
part to fit an application including the original intention of

the resin manufacturer.
I am not recommending that anyone other than the

thermoformer’s client make the final decision on what

material should be used for his application. It is the
thermoformer’s responsibility to furnish the client with

all available information and specifications regarding the
appropriate materials gathered from the resin manufacturer,
the extruder, and their own experience and expertise with

those materials. Ultimately the decision must rest with the
client. If he is unsure or feels incapable of making a decision

based on all the information, the responsibility lies with

him to call in a consultant or someone in his organization
to review all input. His decision has to be based on the

material specifications and costs associated with the different
materials, the life expectancy of the application, warranty

requirements and what will meet either his or the client’s

expectations.

When the client makes a decision regarding what
material he wants to use on his project, it is up to the
thermoformer to work with the extruder and resin
manufacturer to meet client expectations. Maintaining a
documented set of specifications to ensure consistency of

the material from the extruder (who in turn should document
his requirements to the resin manufacturer) is essential. The

thermoformer is then responsible for forming the material to

another documented standard (tooling, temperature, etc.) to

ensure the end result is achieved as projected to the client.

Sincerely,

Lola Carrere

Thermopro, Inc.
1600 Distribution Drive, Suite D
Duluth, GA 30097

*****************

Dear Sir:
I read your recent article with great interest. The issue of

sheet specifications and quality verification is essential but not

addressed by industry in any satisfactory way. Part producers
are at the mercy of sheet providers – no matter how well

requirements are specified. What is lacking is a simple means

to measure performance of incoming sheets vs. a control.
Measuring MFR or melt tension on granulated materials or
determining impurity or regrind is of no use if a part does not
have the same thermoforming behavior.

To address this issue (which has confronted us for some

time), we have developed a patented test device. We have

demonstrated this test device at thermoforming conferences/
shows and have presented results at ANTEC and in the

Thermoforming Quarterly. In the last two years, we have

perfected automation and data acquisition software and have

used test equipment to solve many complex material related
issues. People do find it novel and useful, though despite
these advances, no one is coming forward to support it! What

we need is a simple industry-standard test which gives out

multi-varied information (thermoforming, processing window,
heating rates, sag distance, moisture problem, orientation
issues). I have spent enormous amount of personal resources

to get where we are. I need some industry folks to help me to
pull this through.

I am willing and open to speak with anyone on this.

Regards,

Amit Dharia

Transmit Technology Group, LLC
6005 Commerce Drive, Suite #300
Irving, TX 75063

http://www.transmit-technology.com

(972)-870-9988, Fax: (972)-580-1377

6 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

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Thermoforming QUArTerLY 7

Thermoforming

The Business of Thermoforming

Quarterly®

Early Supplier Involvement:

The Power of Alliance

Mark Kraussman, Business Development Manager

McClarin Plastics, Inc.

What Constitutes Product
Development?

New products, existing product change and
continuous improvement are all product development
initiatives. Competitive pressures and rapid technology
changes have shortened product life cycles and driven
demand for new products. Existing product changes
resulting from regulations and safety considerations also
initiate product modifications. Global competition drives
change relating to cost reduction and thus the need for
continuous improvement processes.

What is Driving “Early Supplier
Involvement”?

Keeping pace with rapid technological and materials
development has made it a necessity to tap into a
supplier’s capabilities allowing an access to innovative
technologies that can result in an increase in market share.
The power of alliance improves the overall design and
quality and thus enhances the manufacturability of the
product and eliminates any non-value elements. There
are also demands to perform with shorter Product Life
Cycles. Alliance is the way of gaining strategic flexibility
and supporting design development, engineering change,
reduced concept to end-user development time, and
increased efficiency. As industries move toward increased
outsourcing the importance of the development of a
supplier – buyer interdependence and division of tasks
relating to the technology expertise becomes more
apparent.

How Can Early Supplier
Involvement Provide a Value
Solution?

Early supplier involvement is a form of vertical
cooperation where manufactures involve suppliers early

in the innovation process. Suppliers will need to turn up
their engineering intensity and increase their responsibility
in product system design and manufacturing. The buyer

(manufacturer) will need to orchestrate cooperation from

internal departments such as purchasing and engineering in

order to realize maximum value from the new relationship.
Early supplier involvement should be part of the planning,
design, and manufacturing phases of product development.

The planning phase involves the functional

specifications of product development. In this phase early

involvement with the supplier will support:

•
The understanding of product definition: how
the product is used and to what conditions it
will be subjected.

•
A defined supplier-buyer interface where buyers
determine the functional specifications and
suppliers provide detail engineering.

•
Platform design specifications to determine the
restrictions within the product systems
interface.

The design phase provides opportunities for savings
through the integration or product design with the supply
chain. Cooperative design FMEA, CAD Models, BOM, and
prototype development will provide cost savings results.
Approximately 80% of the manufacturing cost of a product
is determined by its design.

Value-added initiatives in the manufacturing phase
generated through early supplier development eliminate
waste and support lean manufacturing through:

•
Joint manufacturing FMEA
•
Design for manufacturing
•
Improved product development coordination
•
Inventory reduction
•
Cooperative kaizen events
8
Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Early supplier involvement can develop into a strategic
partnership. The degree of supplier-buyer interdependence
relates to the extent of supplier involvement in product
development. This will lead to capabilities benchmarking,
trust development, and creation of inter-firm knowledge.
These strategic partnerships will result from:

•
The supplier and buyer sharing common beliefs
relating to “best practice methodology.”

•
Risk and investment assumption by the seller
associated with outsourcing and early
involvement including demand variability.
•
A documented agreement between the supplier
and buyer supporting their interdependence.
•
A high asset and technology commitment
specific to the buyer by the seller leading to a

single source relationship preference.

•
A very resource-demanding association for
both parties. However, available resources are
combined in new ways to introduce expanded

innovation.
Early supplier involvement encourages access to the

resources of other firms that can be as important as the
resources within the firm.

x

THE Society of THE Plastic Industry’S
Thermoforming Institute
will be hosting a SPECIAL
Thermoforming Reception
at npe
west hall, booth 119025
THERMOFORMING PAVILION
Tuesday, June 23, 2009
4 pm – 6 pm
MEMBERS OF THE THERMOFORMING INDUSTRY
ARE INVITED TO ATTEND.
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 9

Thermoforming

Thermoforming 2.0

Quarterly®

The Use of Regrind in Thermoforming

Don Hylton and Bill McConnell, McConnell Company

R
R
egrind consists of trimmed salvage, uncontaminated
rejects and unused roll or sheet stock. The use
of regrind is the systematic reprocessing of materials
that have been exposed to at least one pass through a
plasticizing extruder. The word systematic is intentionally
included in the description to imply that the use of regrind
is incorporated according to a specified formulation
with consideration for the effect it may have on the
overall synergy of the system in which it is used. There
are significant positives in the use of regrind. These
include cost savings and processability. Thermoforming
routinely generates 25-50% scrap material. Therefore it is
advantageous from a cost perspective for the material to be
reprocessed and to be reused in the same or similar product.
Sometimes, however, the extrusion output suffers as the
percent of regrind goes up. This is very obvious in thin
gauge extrusion of PET. A thermoformer of circles (lids),
depending on the tooling, can generate up to 50% trim. As
this is blended with virgin PET for extrusion, the output
suffers because of the bulk density feed changes when
compared to that of a lower percent trim.

Another advantage of reprocessing is the apparent
improvement in the processing characteristic of a mixture of
virgin material and regrind. Extruder feedstock containing
regrind is easier to extrude than virgin feedstock without
regrind. The result is increased throughput. Consequently
it is desirable for the extruder to incorporate some amount
of regrind in the process. As with almost every system in
the universe, with advantages there are also corresponding
disadvantages. The most significant disadvantage to using
regrind is the deterioration of properties associated with
multiple heat histories. Most studies and reports on material
effects focus on physical properties such as tensile strength
and impact. Studies have indicated that the use of regrind
including multiple passes does not significantly degrade
physical properties. Therefore regrind is a viable approach
for routine processing.

In addition much consideration is given to the
change in melt flow index (MFI) or intrinsic viscosity
(IV). Although the general conclusion is that the changes
in MFI or IV are not a deterrent, we must warn that it is
not as simple as it appears. MFI and IV are rheological
measurements that relate directly to the molecular weight
of the material. For most thermoplastics, multiple heat
histories result in a reduction of molecular weight. The
change in molecular weight is indicated by an increase in
MFI and a decrease in IV. This fact is one of the primary
reasons for the improvement in extrusion of regrind

containing materials. On the other hand, thermoforming can

be negatively impacted by a decrease in molecular weight.

For the processor, a reduction in molecular weight reduces hot

strength and can have negative implications on part formation
and material distribution.

There is no compelling reason not to use regrind.
For many companies the right amount of regrind to use
is the same percentage as the amount generated in their
thermoforming operation as long as it is less than 50%.
However, the thermoformer must be aware of the possible
negative ramifications of regrind incorporation. In fact, the
amount of regrind and its source should be included in sheet
specifications and strictly followed. Using quality regrind in
extruded sheet and film is a viable and economical practice, as
long as you have clean (uncontaminated) regrind with physical
properties that fall into the processing parameters.

Examples:

Manufacturers of Picnic Ice Chests: These processors

generate about 31% trim and rejects. Consequently, for the
last 45 years this industry has specified 30% of their regrind
be blended with virgin on all sheet material – ABS, HDPE and

HIPS.
Refrigerator Manufacturers: When thermoforming their

liners, they generate 32-40% regrind and extrude their sheet –
ABS, HIPS and PP – with an average of about 35% regrind.

Manufacturers of RV and Mobile Home Tubs, Shower Stalls
and Sinks: Using ABS, Acrylic and PVC, they generate 2540%
regrind depending on part size and configuration. Again,

they use regrind at the same percentage as they generate.

Luggage Industry: Co-extruded ABS sheet with 30-40%
regrind in the core stock has been used for over 30 years. For
appearance the surface is normally color-matched, pigmented,
co-extruded virgin or extrusion laminated printed film.

Disposable Cups and Plates: Co-extrusion with 30-45%

regrind is quite common.
Styrene Foam Food Containers: FDA has approved up to

50% regrind use.

Athletic Shoe Soles: Twin sheet formed TPU with 30%
regrind has passed strength and flexibility specifications.

Many other markets in both roll-fed thin gage and cutsheet
heavy gage materials use regrind on a continuing basis.
Following are some of the thermoplastics that are regularly
blended with regrind:

10 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Heat Histories

What are “heat histories”? Each time a sheet or film is

subjected to heat at or above the heat distortion point it is

considered one “heat history.”

Heat histories occur during the following processes:

1. Compounding
2. Extrusion
3. Calendering
4. Grinding
5. Compression Molding
6. Thermoforming
Compounding, Extrusion and Calendering: In recent
years the development of excellent heat stabilizers, more
efficient screw design and better microprocessor and computer

controls has enabled sheet producers and compounders to keep
material degradation to a minimum.

Grinding: Trim, salvage and clean, non-degraded rejects

should be ground to the proper size as soon as possible after

forming. If unable to immediately insert into a grinder, the

trim parts should be cut up and placed into a large plastic
bag that is usually inside a Gaylord container. Keep the top

on the container or the bag tightly shut except when loading.
Otherwise, static electricity will draw dust and dirt on to
the plastic and the open box is tempting for use as a trash

container. Blades must be sharp at all times. Dull blades cause

excessive shear and friction heat that can degrade the material

which can cause agglomeration (sticking of the particles into

clumps or knots).

Compression Molding and Thermoforming: Care
should be taken not to overheat the sheet surfaces during

thermoforming. When sheet has been scorched, or
the surface darkened or degraded, it becomes scrap.

The temperature of both surfaces should be monitored
throughout the heating process.

Note: When using less than 50% regrind mix, the “heat
histories” of the regrind are always at a mathematical
minimum. For example, after six (6) extrusion passes only
6.4% of the material has had four (4) or more extrusion
histories. As long as the percent of good regrind used is
less than 50% it can be used on a continuing basis. The
following table illustrates this point:

(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 11

Points to know
about using regrind:

1. All major material specifications
should be reviewed by the

thermoformer and the sheet supplier,
together, with a processing window
agreed upon. Specifications such as
melt flow (should be within ± 2%),

impact strength (falling dart and

izod impact), elongation, tensile
strength, modulus of elasticity, color

(degradation of material will show

up first on a color computer with the
color going toward yellow), sheet
orientation (± 5% all the way across
the extrusion web and within a lot,
and from lot-to-lot). Of course, gage
tolerance, surface finish, and other
necessary specifications need to be

decided.

2. For many applications a coextruded
virgin cap stock is

recommended. This will hide regrind

pits, usually caused from dust, dirt,
and the fibrous particles (or “fines”)

of the ABS when ground. This dust

and residue carbonizes when extruded,

leaving black specks. Virgin cap stock
also makes it easier to maintain a
color match.

3. Cross Linking: When
thermoplastic material is subjected
to a heat history, such as extruding,

thermoforming and granulating the
material goes very slightly toward

a thermoset (or slightly cross-links)

which gives the material marginally
improved hot strength. Hot strength

is the elasticity, or stretchability, of

the sheet material while at forming
temperature and the uniformity of how

it stretches (no thick or thin spots).

4. The extruder must produce a
homogeneous, accurate blend of the
regrind with virgin. All of the regrind
should be tested before blending and

certified to the thermoformer, listing
what the test results were. The mixed

regrind/virgin resin should again

be tested before extrusion Periodic

testing should be done as the sheet

is extruded. As mentioned before, a

complete written understanding of the

specifications, tests, and procedures

should be provided by the material
supplier.

5. Some thermoformers have
experienced overall improvement in the

process with use of regrind because the

regrind has been homogeneously mixed

through prior runs. If thoroughly

blended with the virgin material, it is

possible to have a better forming sheet.

With the use of good, quality regrind,

the thermoformed part will not show
signs of degradation.

6. The extruder may be able to run
more throughput with a 30-45%
regrind/virgin mix if he blends into
a precise homogeneous mixture
before the resin enters the extruder or
pelletizes the regrind. Regrind will also

mix much more easily if it has been

passed through a strainer to remove

the fines. With a good, homogeneous
blend the extruder can get “on-stream”

quickly and stay there more easily. For
best results the total run should be pre

blended and thoroughly mixed before
being introduced into the extruder.

12 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 13

Thermoforming
Quarterly®

Lead Technical Article

INFRARED HEAT:

A Simplified Approach – Part One

Mike Sirotnak, Solar Products

Technical Editor’s Note: This is the first installment of a twopart
paper on heating elements for the thermoforming process.
We thank Mike Sirotnak of Solar Products for providing the
information and editing it for this publication. Part Two will appear
in the next issue of Thermoforming Quarterly.

The Basics

For some unknown reason the heating industry has
created a shroud of mystery over the infrared spectrum.
Many companies have given heaters names which actually

have no basis in engineering reality. In this paper, we will

reviewing some of the principles of physics and apply them

to simple selection criteria. This quick exercise will give a

clearer understanding of what truly makes radiant/infrared

heaters tick, and therefore enable you to select the type of

infrared heater needed for a particular job.
There are only three ways to transfer heat:

•
Conduction: via contact
•
Convection: via gas/hot air
•
Radiation: via electromagnetic radiation
In this paper we are concerned only with radiant heaters.
Many people question the difference between radiant and
infrared heat when in actuality there is none. Infrared is one
of four ways in which to transfer heat via radiation:

•
Ultraviolet
•
Infrared
•
Microwave
•
Radio Frequency / Induction
14 Thermoforming QUArTerLY
0,38 0,76 2 4 mm 1 mm
Figure No. 1.4
Gamma
rays
X-rays
Ultra
violet
rays
Infra-red
rays
Radiation
designations Radio waves
Wavelength
1 mm1 nm 1 mm 1 m 1 km
10—9 10—6 10—3 10—0 103 m
Visible
Light
Shortwave
IR
Mediumwave
IR
Long-wave IR

Find the infrared spectrum within the electromagnetic
spectrum. Notice that it is bordered by the visible spectrum
on one end and the microwave spectrum on the other. The
infrared region ranges between 0.72 and 1,000 microns.

Within the infrared spectrum there are short, medium, and
long wavelengths. What is the difference?

•
Shortwave, or near IR (Infrared), is defined as the area
from .72 to 1.5 microns.

•
Medium wave, or middle IR, is defined as the area
which ranges from 1.5 to 5.6 microns.

•
Long wave, or far IR, is defined as the area from 5.6 to
1,000 microns.
To determine whether a heater falls into the category of a

short, medium, or long infrared heater, 80% of your effective
output should be within a defined range.

•
A short wave IR heater should emit 80% of its energy
from .72 to 1.5 microns. To do this most of its points

should be between 3538°C (6400°F) and 1658°C
(3016°F)

•
A medium wave IR heater should emit 80% of energy
from 1.5 to 5.6 microns. To do this most of its points

should be between 1658°C (3016°F) and 244°C (471°F).

•
A long wave/far IR heater should emit the majority of
its energy from 5.6 to 1,000 microns. To do this most of
its points should be less than 244°C (471°F).

How Much Heat?

So now that we’ve established the ground rules for

determining the output of the three types of infrared heaters,
you should have the confidence to make a decision and review

the facts.

We know where the infrared area is and how it is divided,
but what determines if a heater will fall into the near, middle
or far area of the infrared spectrum? We know it must peak
within a particular wavelength. Wavelength output is a
function of temperature – the higher the temperature, the
shorter the peak wavelength. Graph #3 illustrates Planck’s
Law. Planck inserted a point source into a glass sphere. Then
he changed the temperature inside by raising the power. This
resulted in a higher temperature and shifted the peak of the
output curve to shorter wavelengths. Planck’s Law defines the
relationship of wavelength output to temperature. The output
curves of infrared energy are governed by Planck’s Law. This
law applies to Blackbody Point Sources in a vacuum. But what
does this really mean? What was Planck doing, and what is
the significance of the curves? Remember that the reason the
curve (total power) is bigger as we go to higher temperatures
is that Planck had to apply more power to achieve a higher
point source temperature.

Example: A curve for 2000°C might have required Planck
to apply 10 watts to the point source, whereas to get a 500°C
curve, perhaps only 3 watts.

A heater is made up of many millions of point sources,

not just one as in Planck’s curve. Depending on a heater’s

construction, these point sources can all be at one temperature,

or many different temperatures. The total output of a heater is
the sum of all point sources. To calculate the output curve of

a particular heater, plot the curve for each point of the heater

and then add all of the curves together. The total power output
will be the area under the curve. Remember this will not be a
smooth curve like Planck’s because most heaters have many
points at many different temperatures.

For example, let’s say we have three heaters, each
covering a l0″ x 10″ area, with an output of l000 watts.

•
Heater A is one 1000 watt quartz lamp in a 10” x 10”
reflective housing. The operating temperature of the
lamp is 2200°C. The reflective housing is at 150°C
because it is water-cooled.

•
Heater B is two quartz tubes, each at 500 watts with
internal reflectors in a 10” x 10” housing. The operating
temperature of the tube is 1000°C.
•
Heater C is a ceramic face with 10 imbedded coils, each
at 100 watts. The operating temperature of the coil is

650°C. The ceramic in between the coils is at 300°C.

So what do the output curves of these three heaters look
like? Let’s say that a 10” x 10” area has a million points.
That’s 10,000 points per square inch. Differences are shown
in the graph below.

•
Heater A has 50,000 points at 2200°C which has a
peak of 1.17 microns. It has 950,000 points at 150°C
which has a peak of 6.8 microns.

•
Heater B has 100,000 point s at 1000°C which has a
peak of 2.27 microns.

•
Heater C has 500,000 points at 650°C which has a
peak of 3.1 microns. It also has 500,000 points that
are around 300°C which has a peak of 5 microns.
As you can see, three heaters that are rated the same,
actually have different outputs. These curves can change
again if we use a controller to regulate the temperature.
From the above examples, we can conclude that similar watt
heaters can deliver totally different outputs.

What about the heater you are considering? What do you
want it do? To match the temperature output of a short-wave
heater you must use a quartz lamp with an element enclosed
in a vacuum. For medium-wave, all panel-type heaters,
quartz tubes (non-vacuum) ceramics, and metal-sheathed
rods emit the majority of their energy in the medium IR
region. For a long-wave heater, you must control to less than
470F. This is not very practical for most applications.

Visit the
SPE website at
www.4spe.org
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 15

PROSPECTIVE

AUTHORS

Thermoforming
Quarterly® is an “equal
opportunity” publisher!
You will notice
that we have several
departments and feature
articles. If you have a
technical article, send
it to Barry Shepherd,
Technical Editor. All
other articles should
be sent to Conor Carlin,
Editor. Please send in
.doc format. All graphs
and photos should be
of sufficient size and
contrast to provide
a sharp printed image.

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16 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Thermoformer of the Year 2010
The Awards Committee is now accepting nominations for the 2010 THERMOFORMER OF THE
YEAR. Please help us by identifying worthy candidates. This prestigious honor will be awarded to

a member of our industry who has made a significant contribution to the thermoforming industry

in a technical, educational, or managerial aspect of thermoforming. Nominees will be evaluated
and voted on by the Thermoforming Board of Directors at the Spring 2010 meeting. The deadline
for submitting nominations is December 1st, 2009. Please complete the form below and include

all biographical information.

Person Nominated: ____________________________________ Title: ___________________

Firm or Institution______________________________________________________________

Street Address: ____________________________ City, State, Zip: ______________________

Telephone: _______________ Fax: _________________ E-mail: ________________________

Biographical Information:

•
Nominee’s Experience in the Thermoforming Industry.
•
Nominee’s Education (include degrees, year granted, name and location of university)
•
Prior corporate or academic affiliations (include company and/or institutions, title, and
approximate dates of affiliations)
•
Professional society affiliations
•
Professional honors and awards.
•
Publications and patents (please attach list).
•
Evaluation of the effect of this individual’s achievement on technology and progress of
the plastics industry. (To support nomination, attach substantial documentation of these
achievements.)
•
Other significant accomplishments in the field of plastics.
•
Professional achievements in plastics (summarize specific achievements upon which this
nomination is based on a separate sheet).

Individual Submitting Nomination: _______________________ Title: _____________________

Firm or Institution______________________________________________________________

Street Address: ____________________________ City, State, Zip: ______________________

Telephone: _______________ Fax: _________________ E-mail: ________________________

Signature: ___________________________________________ Date: ____________________

(ALL NOMINATIONS MUST BE SIGNED)

Please submit all nominations to: Hal Gilham,
Productive Plastics, 103 West Park Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08045
halg@productiveplastics.com

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 17

Thermoforming

Featured ANTEC Article

Quarterly®

Polypropylene – Cup Conversion
From Injection Molding to Thermoforming

Piaras de Cléir, Kraft Foods Global, Inc., Tarrytown, NY

Abstract
Introduction
18 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Materials
Procedure
Results and Discussion
(continued on next page) (continued on next page)
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 19

20 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 21

References
Conclusion
EDITORS’S NOTE: The editors wish to thank Mr.
Don Hylton and the ANTEC Committee for giving
Thermoforming Quarterly permission to print this
article which will be featured at ANTEC 2009.
x
22 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 23
. Outstanding for ABS, PC/ABS, PVC and HIPS
.Weatherable and easy to fabricate
. Excellent gloss control – from flat matte to
ultra high gloss
. Chemical- , scratch- and UV-resistant
. Available in metallic, clear or any color
www.solarkote.com
Phone: 215.419.7982
Fax: 215.419.5512
E-mail:
andrew.horvath@altuglasint.com
Acrylic Capstock and Film
Capstock solutions for thermoformed sheet.
Altuglas® and Solarkote® are registered trademarks
belonging to Arkema.
© 2005 Arkema Inc. All rights reserved.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………
ISO 9001:2000
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UPCOMING
CONFERENCES
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
SEPTEMBER 19 – 21, 2010
SCHAUMBURG, ILLINOIS
SEPTEMBER 17 – 20, 2011

UNIVERSITY NEWS UNIVERSITY NEWS
Travis J. Kieffer
Awarded Memorial
Scholarship

Travis Kieffer will be a
sophomore at Iowa State University

for the 2009-2010 school year,

studying for a degree in industrial

engineering. A Dean’s List student,

he is an SPE member and attended
the 2008 Thermoforming Division
Conference in Minneapolis.

Travis works at Plastics

Unlimited, a family-owned business,

during summers and as time allows
during the school year. The company

manufactures thermoformed,
composite, urethane, and fiberglass

composite/thermoplastic products. A

believer in green products, Plastics

Unlimited has developed a patentpending
process that incorporates
soy oil in the resin that is used in this
process. Travis was involved in the
development of this process over the
last 4 years.

He is also working on a minor
in Environmental Engineering and
hopes that, upon graduation, the
combination of his major and minor
degrees will enable him to work in
applications involving agriculture and
natural resources. x

From the Editor

If you are an educator, student or advisor in a college or university with
a plastics program, we want to hear from you! The SPE Thermoforming
Division has a long and rich tradition of working with academic partners. From
scholarships and grants to workforce development programs, the division
seeks to promote a stronger bond between industry and academia.
Thermoforming Quarterly is proud to publish news and stories related to
the science and business of thermoforming:
• New materials development
• New applications
• Innovative technologies
• Industry partnerships
• New or expanding laboratory facilities
• Endowments
We are also interested in hearing from our members and colleagues around
the world. If your school or institution has an international partner, please
invite them to submit relevant content.
We publish press releases, student essays, photos and technical papers. If
you would like to arrange an interview, please contact Ken Griep, Academic
Programs, at:
ken@pcmwi.com
or 608.742.7137
24 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Visit
us
at
NPE
2009
Chicago,
IL
McCormick
Place
West
Hall
Booth
119025
Visit
us
at
NPE
2009
Chicago,
IL
McCormick
Place
West
Hall
Booth
119025
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Thermoforming QUArTerLY 25

26 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Need help
with your
technical school
or college
expenses?

I
I
f you or someone you
know is working towards a career
in the plastic industry, let the SPE
Thermoforming Division help support
those education goals.

Within this past year alone, our

organization has awarded multiple

scholarships! Get involved and take

advantage of available support from

your plastic industry!

Here is a partial list of schools
and colleges whose students have
benefited from the Thermoforming
Division Scholarship Program:

• UMASS Lowell
• San Jose State
• Pittsburg State
• Penn State Erie
• University of
Wisconsin
• Michigan State
• Ferris State
• Madison
Technical College
• Clemson University
• Illinois State
• Penn College
Start by completing the application
forms at www.thermoformingdivision.
com or at www.4spe.com. x

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 27

Thermoforming
Quarterly®

New Waste
Framework
Directive – Plastics
Recycling: Tailor-
Made Solutions

Jan-Eric Johansson

T
T
he new Waste Framework Directive
(WFD) will be a key driver towards
a more resource-efficient EU. It will
create incentives to direct waste from
landfill, stimulating the development of
innovative recycling technologies and
allowing more flexibility in selecting

the best waste management options.
From the moment the European

Parliament passed the WFD in June, the
word “recycling” started to encompass

more types of recycling technologies
than ever before. The plastics industry
foresees that this decision will not only
encourage more sustainable ways to
deal with waste that would otherwise

end up in landfills, but will also

ultimately simulate progress in all types
of recycling options. For plastics in

particular, the possibility of adapting the

recycling technology to each material
will result in proper waste management
schemes and lead to optimized resource

efficiency.

When the EU’s member states
implement the new directive into their
legal systems over the next year and a
half, the legal definition of recycling
in Europe will include both traditional
“mechanical” and novel “feedstock”
technologies. It will be recognition by
regulators that eco-efficient recycling
involves more than material-to-material
mechanical recycling. Feedstock allows
the recycling of the material’s building
blocks into new products and not
necessarily back into the same original
material.

Mechanical recycling will remain
the dominant recycling method for
waste plastics, but plastics’ chemical
structures make them the perfect
materials for feedstock. By breaking
down the polymer into its elementary

Thermoforming and Sustainability

chemical building blocks – such as

monomers, synthesis gas, and other

chemical intermediates – plastics can
be used as the basis to produce new

materials. In many cases, this is a more
eco-efficient solution.

Before the revision of the WFD,
investment by the industry in new types
of recycling technology was disregarded
and the resulting materials not recognized
as recycled. Now, innovation in new
technologies will be incentivized, as they
will also contribute towards the national
recycling targets.

Legal requirements already force
member states to reduce the volume
of waste going to landfill and promote
alternative activities. For the revised
WFD, an ambitious target of 50 per cent
has been agreed for the recycling of
household waste. So far, countries such
as Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Germany
and The Netherlands are already
achieving this goal. Others have different
challenges ahead and a wider recycling
definition will surely help them reach the
objective.

According to the revised WFD, this
hierarchy should be applied “flexibly,”
taking into account technical and
economical viability as well as overall
environmental, human health, economic
and social impact. Products which
cannot be reused in an eco-efficient
way should go to recycling and plastics
which are in principle “solid oil” and
cannot be recycled in an environmental
and economical way, and can instead
substitute fossil fuels in a range of
recovery operations. These are perfect
examples of resource efficiency put into
practice; making the best of each product
stream.

Europe can no longer afford to
waste its waste and revised WFD has
recognized its importance as a valuable
resource. Used plastics are now a part
of a larger picture of efficiency and
sustainability and to ignore this important
resource would literally be a shameful
waste of energy.

x

[Excerpted from Plastics in Packaging,
Sayers Publishing (UK), Dec 2008]

Implementing the
3 R’s in Japan

Stuart Hoggard

J
J
apan has packaging recycling rates
that are the envy of the Western
world. Nonetheless, it is planning tougher
measures to improve them further.

The high rates area result of
the Containers and Packaging Law
introduced in 1995, since when they have
increased so that by 2006 were at record
levels. Steel cans reached 95 per cent;
glass bottles 90 per cent; aluminium cans
89 per cent; paper 60 per cent and liquid
paper containers 38 per cent.

The most spectacular improvement

over that period has been in plastics, with

recovery and recycling for PET rising

from 3 per cent to 75 per cent.

But the success of increased plastics
recovery rates has drawn attention to the
challenges presented by the recycling
of more complex materials. Plastics
containers made from materials other
than PET, such as polypropylene,
polyethylene, and polystyrene, are
usually composites that are difficult to

separate and process.
This environmental zeal is all part

of a wider context in which Japan views
the current global financial crisis as an
opportunity to export its policies on waste

management and local sustainability

abroad, firstly to Asia.

The backdrop for this is the
triangular collaboration between
government, industry and the people
which has been the bedrock of society
since the late 19th century.

Even before the current global
financial crisis Japan started re-writing
its economic system under the recentlyrevised
2001 Law For Promoting a
Recycling Society.

The latest development is called a
new Economic Growth Strategy which
was unveiled at the recent Tokyo Pack
show by Economy, Trade and Industry
secretary Yoshifumi Matsumura. This
focuses on resource productivity and
environmental technology to help the
packaging industry through “tough

28 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

times” by calling on industry to make products, particularly environmentally, to export their packaging reduction
“concentrated investments to “drastically that will enable them to “carry out technology. x
improve resource productivity, and
become a low-carbon society”.
It also urges industry to increase
globalization and capture global
markets”.
In other words, Japanese companies
[Excerpted from Plastics in Packaging,
Sayers Publishing (UK), Dec 2008]
R&D to enhance the value of their have now been given the green light

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 29

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30 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Visit Our
Website at:
www.thermoformingdivision.com
Our mission is
to facilitate the
advancement of
thermoforming
technologies
through
education,
application,
promotion and
research.
SPE National
Executive Director
Susan Oderwald
Direct Line: 203/740-5471
Fax: 203/775-8490
email: Seoderwald@4spe.org
Conference Coordinator
Gwen Mathis
6 S. Second Street, SE
Lindale, Georgia 30147
706/235-9298
Fax: 706/295-4276
email: gmathis224@aol.com
Visit Our
Website at:
www.thermoformingdivision.com
Our mission is
to facilitate the
advancement of
thermoforming
technologies
through
education,
application,
promotion and
research.
SPE National
Executive Director
Susan Oderwald
Direct Line: 203/740-5471
Fax: 203/775-8490
email: Seoderwald@4spe.org
Conference Coordinator
Gwen Mathis
6 S. Second Street, SE
Lindale, Georgia 30147
706/235-9298
Fax: 706/295-4276
email: gmathis224@aol.com
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 31

Thermoforming Division

Become a
Thermoforming
Quarterly Sponsor
in 2009!

Do you like the
new look?

Additional sponsorship

opportunities will

include 4-color, full

page, and 1/2 page.

RESERVE
YOUR PRIME
SPONSORSHIP
SPACE TODAY.

Questions?
Call or email

Laura Pichon
Ex-Tech Plastics
847-829-8124
Lpichon@extechplastics.com

Board Meeting
Schedule
2008 – 2009

June 18 – 21, 2009

nPe & AnTeC

ChiCAgo, iL

Board meetings are open to members
of the thermoforming industry.

If you would like to attend as a guest of the
board, please notify Division Secretary, Mike
Sirotnak, at msirotnak@solarproducts.com.

HYTAC ®

Plug Assist Materials
info@cmtmaterials.com www.cmtmaterials.com
TEL (508) 226-3901 FAX (508) 226-3902
CMT MATERIALS,INC.
Innovative Tooling Materials for Thermoforming
BOOK SPACE
IN 2009!

32 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

2009
EDITORIAL
CALENDAR

Quarterly Deadlines for
Copy and Sponsorships

ALL FINAL COPY FOR
EDITORIAL APPROVAL

15-JAN Spring 15-APR Summer
31-JUL Fall 15-OCT Winter
Post NPE Edition

All artwork to be sent in
.eps or .jpg format with
minimum 300dpi resolution.

REDUCE!
REUSE!
RECYCLE!

REDUCE!
REUSE!
RECYCLE!

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 33

Executive
Committee

2008 – 2010

CHAIR

Brian Ray
Ray Products
1700 Chablis Avenue
Ontario, CA 91761
(909) 390-9906, Ext. 216
Fax (909) 390-9984
brianr@rayplastics.com

CHAIR ELECT

Ken Griep
Portage Casting & Mold
2901 Portage Road
Portage, WI 53901
(608) 742-7137
Fax (608) 742-2199
ken@pcmwi.com

TREASURER

James Alongi
Maac Machinery
590 Tower Blvd.
Carol Stream, IL 60188
(630) 665-1700
Fax (630) 665-7799
jalongi@maacmachinery.com

SECRETARY

Mike Sirotnak
Solar Products
228 Wanaque Avenue
Pompton Lakes, NJ 07442
(973) 248-9370
Fax (973) 835-7856
msirotnak@solarproducts.com

COUNCILOR WITH TERM
ENDING ANTEC 2009

Roger Kipp
McClarin Plastics
P. O. Box 486, 15 Industrial Drive
Hanover, PA 17331
(717) 637-2241 x4003
Fax (717) 637-4811
rkipp@mcclarinplastics.com

PRIOR CHAIR

Walt Walker
Prent Corporation
P. O. Box 471, 2225 Kennedy Road
Janesville, WI 53547-0471
(608) 754-0276 x4410
Fax (608) 754-2410
wwalker@prent.com

2008 – 2010 THERMOFORMING DIVISION ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

Chair
Brian Ray
Chair Elect
Ken Griep
Finance
Bob Porsche
Technical Committees
Processing
Walt Speck
Materials
Jim Armor
Machinery
Don Kruschke
Secretary
Mike Sirotnak
Nominating
Dennis Northrop
Publications /
Advertising
Laura Pichon
Newsletter Editor
Conor Carlin
Technical Editor
Barry Shepherd
OPCOM
Lola Carere
Treasurer
James Alongi
AARC
Rich Freeman
Student Programs
Ken Griep
Councilor
Roger Kipp
Prior Chair
Walt Walker
2008 Conference
Minneapolis
Dennis Northrop
Antec
Don Hylton
Conference Coordinator
Consultant
Gwen Mathis
Membership
Haydn Forward
Marketing
Don Kruschke
Recognition
Hal Gilham
Web Site
Rich Freeman
Green Committee
Steve Hasselbach
……………………………………………………….x
………………………………x
………………………………

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………………………………………………P
……………………………………………………..V

………………………………….U
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34 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Board of Directors
MACHINERY
COMMITTEE
James Alongi
Maac Machinery
590 Tower Blvd.
Carol Stream, IL 60188
T: 630.665.1700
F: 630.665.7799
jalongi@maacmachinery.com
Roger Fox
The Foxmor Group
373 S. Country Farm Road
Suite 202
Wheaton, IL 60187
T: 630.653.2200
F: 630.653.1474
rfox@foxmor.com
Hal Gilham
Productive Plastics, Inc.
103 West Park Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08045
T: 856.778.4300
F: 856.234.3310
halg@productiveplastics.com
Bill Kent
Brown Machine
330 North Ross Street
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.7741
F: 989.435.2821
bill.kent@brown-machine.com
Don Kruschke (Chair)
Stopol, Inc.
31875 Solon Road
Solon, OH 44139
T: 440.498.4000
F: 440.498.4001
donk@stopol.com
Brian Winton
Modern Machinery
PO Box 423
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.9071
F: 989.435.3940
bwinton@modernmachineinc.com
MATERIALS
COMMITTEE
Jim Armor (Chair)
Armor & Associates
16181 Santa Barbara Lane
Huntington Beach, CA 92649
T: 714.846.7000
F: 714.846.7001
jimarmor@aol.com
Phil Barhouse
Spartech Packaging
Technologies
100 Creative Way
PO Box 128
Ripon, WI 54971
T: 920.748.1119
F: 920.748.9466
phil.barhouse@spartech.com
Donald Hylton
McConnell Company
646 Holyfield Highway
Fairburn, GA 30213
T: 678.772.5008
don@thermoforming.com
Bill McConnell
McConnell Company
3030 Sandage Street
PO Box 11512
Fort Worth, TX 76110
T: 817.926.8287
F: 817.926.8298
billmc@thermoforming.com
Dennis Northrop
Avery Dennison Performance Films
650 W. 67th Avenue
Schererville, IN 46375
T: 219.322.5030
F: 219.322.2623
dennis.northrop@averydennison.com
Laura Pichon
Ex-Tech Plastics
PO Box 576
11413 Burlington Road
Richmond, IL 60071
T: 847.829.8124
F: 815.678.4248
lpichon@extechplastics.com
Clarissa Schroeder
Invista S.A.R.L
1551 Sha Lane
Spartanburg, SC 29307
T: 864.579.5047
F: 864.579.5288
Clarissa.Schroeder@invista.com
Robert G. Porsche
General Plastics
2609 West Mill Road
Milwaukee, WI 53209
T: 414.351.1000
F: 414.351.1284
bob@genplas.com
Barry Shepherd
Shepherd Thermoforming
5 Abacus Way
Brampton, ONT L6T 5B7
T: 905.459.4545
F: 905.459.6746
bshep@shepherd.ca
Walt Speck (Chair)
Speck Plastics, Inc.
PO Box 421
Nazareth, PA 18064
T: 610.759.1807
F: 610.759.3916
wspeck@speckplastics.com
Jay Waddell
Plastics Concepts & Innovations
1127 Queensborough Road
Suite 102
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
T: 843.971.7833
F: 843.216.6151
jwaddell@plasticoncepts.com
PROCESSING
COMMITTEE
Art Buckel
McConnell Company
3452 Bayonne Drive
San Diego, CA 92109
T: 858.273.9620
F: 858.273.6837
artbuckel@thermoforming.com
Lola Carere
Thermopro
1600 Cross Point Way
Suite D
Duluth, GA 30097
T: 678.957.3220
F: 678.475.1747
lcarere@thermopro.com
Haydn Forward
Specialty Manufacturing Co.
6790 Nancy Ridge Road
San Diego, CA 92121
T: 858.450.1591
F: 858.450.0400
hforward@smi-mfg.com
Richard Freeman
Freetech Plastics
2211 Warm Springs Court
Fremont, CA 94539
T: 510.651.9996
F: 510.651.9917
rfree@freetechplastics.com
Ken Griep
Portage Casting & Mold
2901 Portage Road
Portage, WI 53901
T: 608.742.7137
F: 608.742.2199
ken@pcmwi.com
Steve Hasselbach
CMI Plastics
222 Pepsi Way
Ayden, NC 28416
T: 252.746.2171
F: 252.746.2172
steve@cmiplastics.com
Bret Joslyn
Joslyn Manufacturing
9400 Valley View Road
Macedonia, OH 44056
T: 330.467.8111
F: 330.467.6574
bret@joslyn-mfg.com
Stephen Murrill
Profile Plastics
65 S. Waukegan
Lake Bluff, IL 60044
T: 847.604.5100 x29
F: 847.604.8030
smurrill@thermoform.com
Board of Directors
MACHINERY
COMMITTEE
James Alongi
Maac Machinery
590 Tower Blvd.
Carol Stream, IL 60188
T: 630.665.1700
F: 630.665.7799
jalongi@maacmachinery.com
Roger Fox
The Foxmor Group
373 S. Country Farm Road
Suite 202
Wheaton, IL 60187
T: 630.653.2200
F: 630.653.1474
rfox@foxmor.com
Hal Gilham
Productive Plastics, Inc.
103 West Park Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08045
T: 856.778.4300
F: 856.234.3310
halg@productiveplastics.com
Bill Kent
Brown Machine
330 North Ross Street
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.7741
F: 989.435.2821
bill.kent@brown-machine.com
Don Kruschke (Chair)
Stopol, Inc.
31875 Solon Road
Solon, OH 44139
T: 440.498.4000
F: 440.498.4001
donk@stopol.com
Brian Winton
Modern Machinery
PO Box 423
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.9071
F: 989.435.3940
bwinton@modernmachineinc.com
MATERIALS
COMMITTEE
Jim Armor (Chair)
Armor & Associates
16181 Santa Barbara Lane
Huntington Beach, CA 92649
T: 714.846.7000
F: 714.846.7001
jimarmor@aol.com
Phil Barhouse
Spartech Packaging
Technologies
100 Creative Way
PO Box 128
Ripon, WI 54971
T: 920.748.1119
F: 920.748.9466
phil.barhouse@spartech.com
Donald Hylton
McConnell Company
646 Holyfield Highway
Fairburn, GA 30213
T: 678.772.5008
don@thermoforming.com
Bill McConnell
McConnell Company
3030 Sandage Street
PO Box 11512
Fort Worth, TX 76110
T: 817.926.8287
F: 817.926.8298
billmc@thermoforming.com
Dennis Northrop
Avery Dennison Performance Films
650 W. 67th Avenue
Schererville, IN 46375
T: 219.322.5030
F: 219.322.2623
dennis.northrop@averydennison.com
Laura Pichon
Ex-Tech Plastics
PO Box 576
11413 Burlington Road
Richmond, IL 60071
T: 847.829.8124
F: 815.678.4248
lpichon@extechplastics.com
Clarissa Schroeder
Invista S.A.R.L
1551 Sha Lane
Spartanburg, SC 29307
T: 864.579.5047
F: 864.579.5288
Clarissa.Schroeder@invista.com
Robert G. Porsche
General Plastics
2609 West Mill Road
Milwaukee, WI 53209
T: 414.351.1000
F: 414.351.1284
bob@genplas.com
Barry Shepherd
Shepherd Thermoforming
5 Abacus Way
Brampton, ONT L6T 5B7
T: 905.459.4545
F: 905.459.6746
bshep@shepherd.ca
Walt Speck (Chair)
Speck Plastics, Inc.
PO Box 421
Nazareth, PA 18064
T: 610.759.1807
F: 610.759.3916
wspeck@speckplastics.com
Jay Waddell
Plastics Concepts & Innovations
1127 Queensborough Road
Suite 102
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
T: 843.971.7833
F: 843.216.6151
jwaddell@plasticoncepts.com
PROCESSING
COMMITTEE
Art Buckel
McConnell Company
3452 Bayonne Drive
San Diego, CA 92109
T: 858.273.9620
F: 858.273.6837
artbuckel@thermoforming.com
Lola Carere
Thermopro
1600 Cross Point Way
Suite D
Duluth, GA 30097
T: 678.957.3220
F: 678.475.1747
lcarere@thermopro.com
Haydn Forward
Specialty Manufacturing Co.
6790 Nancy Ridge Road
San Diego, CA 92121
T: 858.450.1591
F: 858.450.0400
hforward@smi-mfg.com
Richard Freeman
Freetech Plastics
2211 Warm Springs Court
Fremont, CA 94539
T: 510.651.9996
F: 510.651.9917
rfree@freetechplastics.com
Ken Griep
Portage Casting & Mold
2901 Portage Road
Portage, WI 53901
T: 608.742.7137
F: 608.742.2199
ken@pcmwi.com
Steve Hasselbach
CMI Plastics
222 Pepsi Way
Ayden, NC 28416
T: 252.746.2171
F: 252.746.2172
steve@cmiplastics.com
Bret Joslyn
Joslyn Manufacturing
9400 Valley View Road
Macedonia, OH 44056
T: 330.467.8111
F: 330.467.6574
bret@joslyn-mfg.com
Stephen Murrill
Profile Plastics
65 S. Waukegan
Lake Bluff, IL 60044
T: 847.604.5100 x29
F: 847.604.8030
smurrill@thermoform.com
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 35

Thermoforming
Quarterly®
SECOND QUARTER 2009
VOLUME 28 n NUMBER 2
Sponsor Index These sponsors enable us to publish Thermoforming Quarterly
Thermoforming
Quarterly®
SECOND QUARTER 2009
VOLUME 28 n NUMBER 2
Sponsor Index These sponsors enable us to publish Thermoforming Quarterly
n Allen ……………………….. 23
n Advanced Ventures in

Technology ……………. 30
n Arkema / Altuglas ……….. 23
n Brown Machine …………… 31
n CMT Materials ……………. 32
n Edward D. Segen ………… 23
n Future Mold ………………. 30
n GN Plastics ……………….. 30
n Kiefel ………………………. 16
n Kydex LLC ……… Back Cover
n KMT Robotic Solutions ….. 36
n Maac Machinery………….. 33
n McClarin Plastics…………. 30
n Modern Machinery ………. 30
n Monark …………………….. 31
n NPE 2009 ……….Inside Back

Cover
n Onsrud Cutter ……………. 25
n PCI …………………………. 16
n PMC ………………………… 33
n Portage Casting & Mold…. 12
n Primex Plastics …………… 16
n Profile Plastics Corp. ……. 23
n Protherm ……………………. 7
n PTi ……………………………. 7
n Ray Products ……………… 23
n Solar Products ……………. 36
n Stopol ……………………….. 7
n Tempco ……………………. 12
n Thermwood……………….. 25
n Tooling Technology ………. 27
n TPS ………………………… 27
n Ultra-Metric Tool…………. 34
n WECO ……………………… 24
n Xaloy, Inc. ………………… 27
n Yushin America …………… 13
n Zed Industries……………. 23

36 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

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