Quarterly Mags: 2009 3rd

Quarterly®
Thermoforming
A JOURNAL OF THE THERMOFORMING DIVISION OF THE SOCIETY OF PLASTIC ENGINEERS THIRD QUARTER 2009 n VOLUME 28 n NUMBER 3
Thermoforming Makes a Big Impression at NPE 2009
®
Quarterly®
Thermoforming
A JOURNAL OF THE THERMOFORMING DIVISION OF THE SOCIETY OF PLASTIC ENGINEERS THIRD QUARTER 2009 n VOLUME 28 n NUMBER 3
Thermoforming Makes a Big Impression at NPE 2009
®
NSIDE …I
Operating in Shrinking Market page 8
Tooling: Speed vs. Cost page 10
Industry Practice: The Art of Tool Engraving page 12
WWW.THERMOFORMINGDIVISION.COM

Thermoforming
Quarterly®
THIRD QUARTER 2009
VOLUME 28 n NUMBER 3
Contents Contents
Thermoforming
Quarterly®
n
Departments
Chairman’s Corner x 2
Thermoforming in

the News x 4
The Business of
Thermoforming x 8
Thermoforming and Sustainability x
24

Page 4
Front Cover
Page 7
n
Features
Lead Technical Article x
6

Infrared Heat: A Simplified Approach – Part Two

Thermoforming 2.0 x
10

The Latest Tooling Options: Quality and Speed versus Cost

Industry Practice x
12

Texturing and Engraving for Thermoforming Molds

n
In This Issue

Thank You from the 2009 Thermoformer

of the Year x
5
Visit Us on the Web x
22
Council Summary x
30
2009 Editorial Calendar x 33

Sponsorship x
36

Page 30
A JOURNAL PUBLISHED EACH CALENDAR
QUARTER BY THE
THERMOFORMING DIVISION
OF THE SOCIETY OF PLASTICS ENGINEERS

Editor

Conor Carlin

(617) 771-3321
cpcarlin@gmail.com
Technical Editor

Barry Shepherd

(905) 459-4545 Ext. 229
Fax (905) 459-6746
bshep@shepherd.ca
Sponsorships

Laura Pichon

(847) 829-8124
Fax (815) 678-4248
lpichon@extechplastics.com
Conference Coordinator

Gwen Mathis

(706) 235-9298
Fax (706) 295-4276
gmathis224@aol.com
Thermoforming Quarterly® is published
four times annually as an informational
and educational bulletin to
the members of the Society of Plastics
Engineers, Thermoforming Division, and the
thermoforming industry. The name, “Thermoforming
Quarterly®” and its logotype,
are registered trademarks of the Thermoforming
Division of the Society of Plastics
Engineers, Inc. No part of this publication
may be reproduced in any form or by any
means without prior written permission of
the publisher, copyright holder. Opinions of
the authors are their own, and the publishers
cannot be held responsible for opinions or
representations of any unsolicited material.
Printed in the U.S.A.

Thermoforming Quarterly® is registered
in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
(Registration no. 2,229,747). x

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 1

Thermoforming
Quarterly® Chairman’s Corner
Brian Ray Brian Ray
One of the great
things about being chairman of
the division is that I have the
opportunity to meet other industry
leaders. When you get this group
together, you get a very clear
understanding of the opportunities
that lie ahead for thermoforming.

I recently returned from NPE
2009 in Chicago, where our

division sponsored the first

ever Thermoforming Pavilion.
The Pavilion was a tremendous
success for a variety of reasons.
First of all, the booth was very
interactive and allowed visitors
to see innovative thermoformed
parts. Secondly, industry
professionals were in the booth
to answer questions and provide
technical information about the
process. The Pavilion became a
crossroads of everything related
to thermoforming. At any given
time you could look around and
see attendees holding parts saying,
“I did not know that you could
do this with thermoforming,” or
“Is this injection molded?” or
“How is this part made?” All these

questions created a buzz and a
sense of excitement that reinforced
the fundamental optimism that
I have about our process and
markets.

As processors, we often compete
against each other. The sooner
we channel our competitive
energy back into the process and
markets we serve, the sooner
we will reach the individuals

that are seeking the benefits that

our process provides. As our
customers become more educated
about the thermoforming process
and its capabilities, we should
begin to see additional growth
as successful programs lead to
future projects. For this to happen,
we need to do our part to ensure
that we showcase a repeatable
process. This is accomplished
through part development, tooling
design and material selection
paired with forming equipment
and secondary capabilities to
ensure that a cost-effective product

meets exacting specifications.

Although we compete amongst
ourselves as an industry, we must
not forget that we also compete
with other processes such as sheet

metal, fiberglass, structural foam,

pulp, corrugated, folded cartons,
injection and blow molding.

The board of directors, as a
group, will actively pursue those
interested people that visited
our booth at NPE. With targeted
follow up, we will attempt to

enroll them as active members
in the division and hopefully
attract new faces to the board.
We will talk to the suppliers
and invite them to participate in
the conference and to consider
a sponsorship in the Quarterly.
We will make contact with
the designers and engineers
and let them know about the
annual conference and provide
them access to educational
information. Lastly, we will keep

the information flowing to the

processors to ensure that they have
the most up-to-date information
for themselves and their coworkers.
We will remind everyone
that there is a time and place each
September that allows them to
review technical data, meet with
industry leaders and see the latest
innovations that our industry has
to offer.

The next Thermoforming
Conference has been scheduled
for September 18 – 21, 2010
in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
The theme of the conference is
“Embrace the Challenge.” You can
be sure that this conference will
provide the technical instruction
and hands-on supplier interaction
that are crucial to the continued
progress and innovation that our
customers demand. x

Brian Ray
Chair

2 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Kareem Hammoudeh
Almarfraq Plastic Industries
Amman, Jordan
Erik Jackson
Essilor of America
St. Petersburg, FL
Frederick W. Jefferis
Kinro Composites
Waxahachie, TX
Allen Kidd
Placentia, CA
Why Join?
®
Why Not?
It has never been more important to be a member
of your professional society than now, in the current
climate of change and volatility in the plastics industry.
Now, more than ever, the information you access and
the personal networks you create can and will directly
impact your future and your career.
Active membership in SPE – keeps you current, keeps
you informed, and keeps you connected.
The question really isn’t “why join?” but …
Thermoforming
Quarterly® New Members
Abdulaziz Al Serri
Kuwait Packing Materials Mfg. Co.
Safat, Kuwait
Ian Arnold
Package Development Corp.
Kansas City, KS
Randy Burcham
Burcham Int’l. Corp.
Nokomis, FL
Nav S. Chawla
Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Willard G. Cutler
C & C Thermoforming, Inc.
Palmer, MA
Richard Dyble
Panoramic, Inc.
Janesville, WI
Mohamed A. Elnagmi
Dundas, ON, Canada
Fouad Erchiqui
Université du Québec en Abitibi-
Témiscamingue
Rouyn-Noranda, QC, Canada
Scott F. Gillespie
General Mills, Inc.
Minneapolis, MN
Gerardo Pena Kareem Hammoudeh
Almarfraq Plastic Industries
Amman, Jordan
Erik Jackson
Essilor of America
St. Petersburg, FL
Frederick W. Jefferis
Kinro Composites
Waxahachie, TX
Allen Kidd
Placentia, CA
Why Join?
®
Why Not?
It has never been more important to be a member
of your professional society than now, in the current
climate of change and volatility in the plastics industry.
Now, more than ever, the information you access and
the personal networks you create can and will directly
impact your future and your career.
Active membership in SPE – keeps you current, keeps
you informed, and keeps you connected.
The question really isn’t “why join?” but …
Thermoforming
Quarterly® New Members
Abdulaziz Al Serri
Kuwait Packing Materials Mfg. Co.
Safat, Kuwait
Ian Arnold
Package Development Corp.
Kansas City, KS
Randy Burcham
Burcham Int’l. Corp.
Nokomis, FL
Nav S. Chawla
Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Willard G. Cutler
C & C Thermoforming, Inc.
Palmer, MA
Richard Dyble
Panoramic, Inc.
Janesville, WI
Mohamed A. Elnagmi
Dundas, ON, Canada
Fouad Erchiqui
Université du Québec en Abitibi-
Témiscamingue
Rouyn-Noranda, QC, Canada
Scott F. Gillespie
General Mills, Inc.
Minneapolis, MN
Gerardo Pena
Peninsula Packaging
Jim D. Lambright, Jr.
Solo Cup Co.
Lincolnshire, IL
Jason Lubs
General Mills
Golden Valley, MN
Darryl B. Nazareth
Flanders, NJ
Mark Panus
Plastech Vacuum Forming
Shiner, TX
Edgar A. Pedraja
Zuliana de Plásticos, C.A.
Maracaibo, Venezuela
Aspers, PA
Victor K. Rimkevicius
Wilbert Plastic Services
Broadview, IL
Caryl Ritz
United Space Alliance
Cape Canaveral, FL
Sergio Scigliano
Delker
Itu, SsaoPpaulo, Brazil
Aric Slavin
Dordan Manufacturing, Inc.
Woodstock, IL
Ben R. Stover
Bemis
Fremont, OH
William Taylor
New Palestine, IN
Marc Yazel
Mullinix Packages, Inc.
Fort Wayne, IN
Bin Zhu
The Ohio State University
Columbus, OH
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 3

Thermoforming in the news
Some Comments
on NPE 2009

Editor’s Note: The following comments were
provided by representatives of several
thermoforming machinery manufacturers. They
are subjective observations based on company
experiences at NPE 2009 and not representative of
any official show commentary.

“Although the attendance numbers
were way down, the people we were
talking to were decision makers. The
show was actually very good for us.
We saw all of our key customers and
target customers. We also met many
people (many foreign) that we may not
have had contact with otherwise.”

x

– Lyle Industries
“We felt the show traffic was
noticeably lighter but that most of the
principal manufacturers in our sector
were present. While the quantity of
visitors was lower we found the quality
to be very good in that many visitors
were decision makers not just there
to make idle inquiries. We learned
of some interesting developments in
green or compostable materials that
have developed to the point of being
practical in terms of process and
cost.” x

– Irwin Research & Development
“Due to the economic situation,
we expected a slow show. The opposite
was the case. We had lots of good
meetings and inquiries which is very
promising for the near future. The
quality of the talks was high.”

x

– Gabler Maschinbau
“Our expectations were low due
to the general economic situation. We
saw fewer visitors but those we talked
to resulted in medium-to-high quality
of discussions. Good and interesting
meetings to specific projects, especially
biodegradable applications.”

x

– Kiefel Technologies
Jennifer Kaye of the Thermoforming Institute presents an award to
outgoing president John Knight.

L-R: Ken Darby (Conference Chair, ETD), Ken Braney (SPE President-
Elect), Roger Kipp (SPE Councilor), and Brian Ray (Chairman,
Thermoforming Division).

Example of
thermoformed
parts on display
at the SPI
Thermoforming
Pavilion, NPE
2009.

4 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Thank You from 2009 Thermoformer of the Year
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 5

INFRARED HEAT:
A Simplified Approach – Part Two

Thermoforming
Quarterly®

Mike Sirotnak, Solar Products

Technical Editor’s Note: This is the second and final installment of
the paper on heating elements for the thermoforming process.
Together these two parts provide a complete understanding of
the types of heaters that are used in out process. We thank Mike
Sirotnak for submitting the content and editing for this publication.

N
N
ow that we understand how to calculate heater
wavelength output, the question becomes: how
does wavelength affect my process? Infrared radiation is
reflected, absorbed or transmitted when it hits an object.
All materials have absorption curves which show what
wavelength the materials will best absorb.

ABSORPTION PERCENTAGES FOR WATER & PVC

As an example, the graph above illustrates the difference
in absorption curves for water and PVC. Find the peak
absorption areas of the graph above. For most plastics,
the CH (carbon/ hydrogen) bond will peak in the 3.2 –

3.4 micron range. For water, the OH (oxygen/hydrogen)
bond will peak at 2.9 – 3.0 microns. Ideally, you would
like your heater to output the majority of its energy in
the area where it will be absorbed best.
Some manufacturers sell their heaters on the ability of
a customer to tune the output to a product, when in fact
every heater can do this if you have the ability to control
the temperature of the heater.

What is Emissivity?

Emissivity is defined as a measure of radiant efficiency.
If an object has an emissivity factor of 1.0, then it is
the perfect radiator and absorber. This is referred to as

Lead Technical Article

the “perfect blackbody.” If an object has an emissivity of
0, then it is a perfect reflector, and does not absorb any
radiant heat.

How does this affect your heater’s performance? Imagine
two heaters with the same wattage and voltage. One has
an aluminum face and the other has a black-coated steel
face. Because aluminum is a poor radiator, you can hold
your hand close to the surface without feeling any heat. In
contrast, black steel is a good radiator, therefore when you
hold your hand close, it is emitting heat. If the heater was
constructed with a face that acts like a “window” allowing
all the energy to pass through (e.g. quartz and vycor), then
you are concerned with the emissivity of the source (coil
or wire) of the energy.

Most sources are very close to a 1.0 emissivity factor.

What is Quartz?

Quartz is a highly misused term. Quartz glass is fused
sand (SiO2) and is available in plate or tube form in
either clear or opaque materialization. Quartz cloth
is woven quartz fibers very similar to fiberglass. All
quartz materials are excellent transmitters of infrared
energy.

Applying These Theories to
Heaters

We have learned that an infrared heater must output
wavelengths between .72 and 1,000 microns. We also
know that heaters can be short, medium or long infrared
depending on where the majority of output falls within
the infrared spectrum. We know that temperature affects
the curve of the wavelength, and therefore heaters that
are rated the same but constructed differently, can have
different energy output.
We know that all radiation is reflected, absorbed or
transmitted when it hits an object. The degree to which an
object either reflects or absorbs radiant heat is measured
by its emissivity factor.

We can now apply these facts in determining the kind of
heater you need and how it should be constructed.

6 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

All Heaters Have 3 Parts:

•
The SOURCE of the energy which can be coil, foil or
wire

•
The SOURCE SUPPORT
OR REFLECTOR which
supports the coil or directs the heat

•
The FACE which electrically insulates the source
and acts either as a “window” allowing all primary
radiation to pass through or as an absorber which
will absorb the heat and then release it as secondary
radiation.

There Are Two Kinds of Infrared
Heaters:

•
PANEL
heaters have a face and are in a box type
construction with a length, width and depth. The
panel IR heater directs its energy out its face via
different construction techniques.

•
TUBULAR heaters have either a metal or quartz
sheath which houses a resistance coil.

You can now begin to research the kind of heater that is
needed for your particular needs. There are many different
types of heaters available, so choosing the right one

can be relatively easy. Your choice will fortunately be
limited by examining your intended process application.

Consider These Points When
Selecting A Heater:

RESPONSE TIME – Is your application one where you
need optimal heat in seconds, or are minutes acceptable?
If time is a key factor, then quartz tubes or an exposed
coil, ribbon or panel is your only choice.

SHORT OR LONG WAVES – If your product or process
is more responsive to shortwave, then quartz lamps with
a filament in vacuum is appropriate. If medium wave,
then quartz tubes or panel heaters are best.

POWER EQUIPMENT – Heater output is measured in
watts per square inch. For example a 12″ x 12″ heater
with 5760 watts has a watt density of 40 watt/inch. A
12″ x 12″ heater with 1440 watts has only 10 watt/inch.
With tubular/quartz tubes, you measure watts/linear inch
of tube length. Then you decide on what centers you are
mounting the tubes. For example, a 12″ tube with 600
watts has 50 watts/linear inch of tube. If the tubes are
placed on 1″ centers, then you have 50 watts/inch. There
is no magic formula for deciding total power, because so
much depends on the environment and the product to be
heated.

ENVIRONMENT – Is it clean or dirty? Are you making
computer chips or printing t-shirts? Are you working
with an existing production line or designing a new one?
Will the heaters be installed in an abusive environment?
Does your process involve harmful solvents or vapors?
Will anything be falling on the heater face? These are
important questions to answer before selecting a heater.

CONTROL METHOD – Infrared heaters can be
controlled in one or two ways (Open Loop) Percentage
Timer or (Closed Loop) Temperature Control. The
Temperature Control method is the most accurate way
to control your heaters and keep them at a consistent
temperature. If you choose to pursue the temperature
control method, then you will need to decide whether
to use a thermocouple or a pyrometer to measure
temperature.

Armed with the answers to these questions the heater
that fits your needs can easily be selected. Selecting one
becomes a straightforward and simple procedure if you
don’t get bogged down in the vendor mumbo-jumbo.
Just keep it simple, use common sense, and you’ll find
the right heater for your application. x

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 7

Thermoforming
Quarterly®

The Business of Thermoforming

Operating in a Shrinking Market

Jeff Mengel, Plante & Moran

“I haven’t seen a good company
with a bad balance sheet since the
late 1980s or early ’90s. I think in
this cycle, we’ll start to see some
great companies with bad balance
sheets.” (Michael Psaros, KPS
Capital Partners)

Sad but true. We have already
started to see this trend and we
will likely see more of it before
this recession comes to an end.
This led us to wonder, how are
plastics companies dealing with
the economy, and what will the
industry look like coming out of
the recession?

To answer these questions, Plante
& Moran examined the bookends
of the industry by selecting 40
high-leveraged and low-leveraged

companies identified from our

2008 North American Plastics
Industry Study (NAPIS). Out of
172 participating companies, 20
had more than a 4:1 debt-to-equity
position and 20 had less than a

1:1 debt-to-equity position. The
following provides an overview of
how plastics processors (injection,
extrusion, thermoforming, and
blow molding) are faring and
what to expect from the plastics
industry going forward.
How Bad Is It?

According to NAPIS data,
approximately 30% of the industry
is heavily leveraged, and 25%
has a debt-to-equity position of

4.5 to 1 or higher. According to
the Original Equipment Suppliers
Association’s February 2009 survey
of 82 members, 23% had covenant
violations, and an additional 18%
had violations pending; 9% revealed
that bankruptcy was imminent, and
an additional 22% said bankruptcy
was extremely likely. These
results were not entirely caused
by bad management – liquidity
may determine these companies’
fates more than skill or strategy.
While larger companies may seek
reorganization, smaller ones will
be less likely to find financing

and be forced into liquidation,
resulting in 240,000 available tools
(an additional 120,000 tools may
be transferred by customers to
maximize leverage).

However, the question of “How bad
is it?” really depends on the degree
to which plastics companies are
leveraged. According to the NAPIS,
the majority of low leveraged
companies have greater than 62%
sales as engineered components
and only 5% sales as simple shootand-
ship parts. The majority of
these companies had anticipated
to grow revenues over 2% in 2009
from 2007. In contrast, a majority
of highly leveraged companies have
greater than 90% sales as a shootand-
ship processor and the majority
of these companies had anticipated
losing more than 17% in sales in
2009 from 2007.

Subsequent to this survey, as the
economy continued to sour, the
demand for plastic products was

more dependent on whether the
purchase was capital or consumable
in nature. Capital items are showing
demand declines averaging 30% to
40% while consumable items are
showing declines of 10% to 20%.
Very few companies have enjoyed
an increase in sales in 2009.

How Are
Companies
Dealing With the
Downturn?

Surprisingly, low-leveraged
companies were more aggressive
with headcount reductions, both in
overall numbers and the timing in
anticipation of demand reduction.
While highly leveraged companies
focused on production employees
in their headcount reductions, lowleveraged
companies were far more
proactive with permanent reductions
in general and administrative
headcount as they positioned
themselves to become smaller
companies in 2009.

As expected, highly leveraged
companies have been much more
aggressive with expense reductions,
including wage reductions, while
low-leveraged companies have
been selective in application. For
example, they are shown to be more
apt to cut people than wages.

In terms of investment activity, both
highly leveraged and low-leveraged
companies are maintaining
equipment. However, low-leveraged

8 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

organizations are still acquiring
some equipment, while highly
leveraged ones have ceased buying
equipment altogether.

And what about financing? Low

leveraged companies have little
debt and few bank restrictions.
Unsurprisingly, highly leveraged
companies are seeking debt
restructuring, as many are in
covenant default. Still, the highly
leveraged have done an excellent
job of reducing expenses and
paying down debt as the reduction
in demand has allowed them to
convert receivables into cash.

Tool Time

The anticipated level of tool
transfer, unprecedented in our
industry’s history (240,000
available tools and an additional
120,000 tools that may be
transferred by customers) will
provide substantial growth
opportunities for those prepared
for transfer work. There has been a
fair amount of tool movement, and
it is not over yet. Unfortunately,
there will be additional casualties,
as some highly leveraged
companies will not have the
working capital to recover when

the economy recovers.
Everyone wants to take on new
work when sales are faltering,
but it is important to note that
not everyone is designed to take
on transfer work. You have to
be very adept at working with
older tools, dealing with shorter
production runs, and navigating
multiple programs. Additionally,
you cannot predict when such
events will happen; you just have
to let your customers know that
you are ready, willing and able to
capitalize on opportunities as they
arise.

Going Forward

While our industry has its
challenges, it’s not all gloom
and doom. We are pleasantly
surprised at how aggressively
both low-leveraged and highly
leveraged organizations have
restructured to become smaller
companies. In addition, there is
immense opportunity to create
more strategic impact going
forward than at any other time
in your company’s history. As
differentiation becomes more
noticeable, companies should
focus on creating a meaningful
message and developing a core
competency that resonates.
Companies with strong balance
sheets can acquire improved
talent, additional facilities,
additional capabilities, and
increase their books of business.

Jeff Mengel is a partner at
Plante & Moran and leads the

firm’s Plastics Industry Team.

Jeff is a CPA with over 30 years
of experience that has been
studying the industry through
benchmarking studies for over 14
years and can be reached at
jeff.mengel@plantemoran.com.

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 9

Thermoforming
Quarterly®

Thermoforming 2.0

The Latest Tooling Options:

Quality and Speed versus Cost

Excerpted from: Technical Editor’s Note: So often the question of tool cost becomes a
The Latest Advancements in Thermoforming by Frank Karai, ODC discussion among Engineering, Production and Sales. Each department

(Thermoforming Quarterly 2007 Volume 26, Number 2)

[F.K.] Large thermoforming
companies are driving
advances in tooling.

The larger the thermoforming
company, the more refined their
thermoforming process and the
greater the expectations to use
state of the art tooling. Equipment
is typically larger and engineering
and forming process support is
greater than smaller regional
thermoformers. The interest in
cycle time reduction and speed
of tool changes is driven by the
large formers competing for high
volume national accounts which
are very competitively bid. The
overriding fact, however, is that
proper tool design is always
dependent on the application.

[B.S.] This, in my opinion, is the
most important factor for growing
thermoforming companies to
know. It is widely understood
that people are first and foremost
for companies with ambitions
to be leaders in their field. The
job of engineering the machines
and tooling is best handled by
experienced professionals with
comprehensive knowledge of all
the options. As with any other
industry, R & D to maximize
efficiencies takes place at those
companies that can afford to
hire professional staff. However,

weighs in with their arguments about set-up time, production speed,
part quality and, of course, how the cost is impacted. If times are good
and the backlog is overflowing, the tendency is to build tooling that
will set-up and run good parts as efficiently as possible with less regard
for tool cost. This is the case regardless of whether the tooling is billed,
absorbed into the part cost or sold as part of the project development.
When cash flow is tight, however, tooling cost becomes a higher priority.
Larger companies have thermoforming engineering staff to deal with
this question on a daily basis and generally have access to the most
advanced tool design capabilities. With this service comes an added
cost which invariably is justified by the promise of higher returns from
volume sales. With his approval, I have reprinted parts of an article
written by Frank Karai of Ontario Die Corporation in the Fall 2007 issue
of Thermoforming Quarterly. I have added my comments (in italics).

there are government programs for
smaller thermoformers, especially
in difficult economic times, to assist
with such things as improvements
in cycle time and tool setup. They
would do well to look at hiring a
qualified engineer to head up this
initiative. The cost of that person
can sometimes be paid for in the
first year or two of cost savings
and will lead to increased sales by
being more competitive and more
innovative.

[F.K.] The pressure to down
gauge

The move to down-gauging
material has resulted in the use
of more engineered molds and
plug materials. Air actuated water
cooled individual cavity clamping is
common.

[B.S.] Down-gauging, even minor
reductions in material thickness,

is now considered a step in the
right direction towards a greener
environment as well as shaving
dollars from part cost. Forming
thinner parts while achieving
the same wall thickness as with
heavier gauge material can only
be achieved by fine tuning the tool
design and by utilizing the latest
machine upgrades.

[F.K.] Third motion plug assist

The use of high-speed European
equipment is growing in North
America. Many of these machines
are equipped with third motion
plug drives that increase process
control and improve material
distribution leading to down
gauging opportunities. Third motion
plug activation is especially useful
on deep draw and heavy gauge
applications where sheet-sag may

10 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

be of concern (female mold on top;
third motion on bottom).

[B.S.] I consider third motion
plug drives to be one of the most
significant advancements in our
industry. Thermoformers who
purchase new equipment now are
missing out on the best way to
improve material distribution and
down gauge if third motion plug
assist is not included on the form
press.

[F.K.] Temperature control

Flood-cooling improves mold
temperature control versus contactcooled
molds. Increasingly
sophisticated mold cooling
techniques such as cooling pins
and thermal calculations are
optimizing cycle times. The use
of smaller diameter lines, multiple
cooling lines, advanced manifolding
techniques, in-line turbulators,
higher volume and flow rates are
improving BTU removal. The use of
thermolators on tower water ensures
optimal mold temperature is reached
even on start-up and there is an
added benefit of increased flow and
turbulence which improves cooling
efficiency.

[B.S.] Consistent mold temperature
is a must in order to maintain good
quality. Faster cycle times translate
into greater difficulty in controlling
the mold temperature. Cooling
lines throughout the mold cavities
as well as the mold base provide a
better chance of getting the same
temperature on all tool surfaces. All
the advances mentioned above are
aimed at keeping form tooling at the
same temperature while removing
heat from the sheet at fast cycle
times.

[F.K.] Pressure and vacuum
advancements

Air distribution has become
more advanced allowing for faster
forming, leading to better definition
and faster cycles. Pressure/vacuum
combination is now the norm with
air being distributed throughout
the mold at multiple points of
distribution. The use of baffles to
diffuse pressure forming air avoids
spot chilling parts. Vent-hole sizes
have gotten smaller allowing more
of them to be used. The use of slot
venting is useful when possible.

[B.S.] Getting air pressure and
vacuum to and from the tool as
fast as possible has been given
more attention as the need for fast
cycle times has grown. While these
features may not be as important as
other advances they all contribute
to better thermoforming.

[F.K.] Reduced downtime

Quick change cavities and plugs
are commonly used to allow parts
with common footprints to be run
with very little downtime for tool
changes resulting in greater machine
throughput.

[B.S.] Several companies have
developed locking devices that are
being used to make clamping molds
and plugs a simple operation that
can be done in a matter of minutes
without removing bases from the
press.

[F.K.] Plug materials and
simulation software

Advanced plug materials such
as B1X and WFT improve plug
performance, resulting in down
gauging and better material

distribution. Plug materials are
more thermally stable allowing for
faster cycle times. Solid modeling
software and forming simulations
are more commonly used allowing
for more intricate and thorough
design investigations which
impact cycle times.

[B.S.] There have been many
technical papers written on
the latest developments in plug
material and almost as many on
the use of computer simulations
to predict the forming results
using these new materials. Again,
these advancements may seem
minor when assessing the gains
in efficiency but thermoformers
must pay attention to anything that
makes them more competitive.

[F.K.] Every application is
unique

Mold design needs to respect
the particular demands of the part
geometry, part structural integrity,
lock designs and undercuts plus
unique properties of materials
including multi-layer barrier
materials and biodegradables such
as PLA.

[B.S.] Many variable come into
play when designing a thermoform
tool especially when one considers
the latest options available. We
must look beyond the simple
questions of number of cavities
and type of trim tool and start
asking ourselves, “Are we utilizing
all the tooling options available to
us today?” x

TQ

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 11

Thermoforming
Quarterly®

Industry Practice

Texturing and Engraving for
Thermoforming Molds

Jack Hill and Pete Kambouris
Wisconsin Engraving Company / UNITEX

T
T
he look and feel of quality has a significant
impact on the marketing appeal of a plastic
part whether it a package or a product. In today’s
competitive marketplace, making a product stand
out from its competition is critical in the race to win
sales.

Texturing of thermoform molds can add features
including the look of simulated leather, the feel
of a geometric grain, the sheen of a multi-gloss
pattern or even gloss control. Detailed engraving
of logos, recycling codes, part numbers and cavity
identification can be incorporated into all surfaces
adding quality and structure to the part.

Thin-Gauge Mold Applications

Multi-cavity molds can be engraved by hand,
by chemical etching (Chem-Grave®), by EDM
(Electronic Discharge Machine), by CNC or by
using a pantograph. Artwork for the engraving,
typically of logos, cavity identifications, recycle
codes or part numbers, can be sent electronically or
by supplying camera ready artwork. Unless the part
is pressure formed, the thermoforming process does
not always pick up all the details of the engraving
(unlike injection molding) it is always best to have
clean, crisp, detailed artwork in the tooling. A high
quality engraving facility will have the capabilities to
offer multiple ways of engraving your tooling. Also,
the engraver should have knowledge of how deep
an engraving should be in the tooling to maximize
quality and readability after a part has been formed.

When texturing aluminum tooling, you must first
start by determining what type of pattern is desired.
In order to properly pick a texture for your project,
a texture house should be consulted to determine
if the tooling is designed to handle the requested

Textured area on tray mold sidewall is used to block out
printing on the contents

specification. The most important factor in specifying
a texture is the draft requirement. Not having enough
draft in your tooling will cause a part to stick or
scuff upon ejection from the mold. The general rule
of thumb is 1.5 degrees of draft per every 0.001″ of
texture depth. Other important considerations when
dealing with draft include material shrink rate and
whether or not the vertical wall is an inside or outside
wall.

Vacuum holes require unique processing to ensure
they do not become damaged during texturing. It is
preferable that the vacuum holes be drilled in after
texturing, though that is not always possible.

Where gloss (measured by the amount of light
reflected off the part) is important, texturing can be
used to provide the desired affect. For example, a
leather or matte finish will reduce gloss. However,
the color and type of plastic, mold surface (cast or
machined), mold hardness, venting and forming
pressure will all have an effect on the gloss of the
part. By letting the texture house know ahead of time
what type of plastic material is being molded, they
can usually supply the proper gloss on the surface of
the tool. Gloss can be adjusted after the tool has been
sampled.

12 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Textured with woodgrain

Heavy-Gauge Mold Applications

Using the above methods, texturing or engraving
of solid aluminum castings or cast aluminum cavities
can be easily done on cavity sidewalls or cavity
bottoms. As with thin gauge molds, chemical etching
(Chem-Grave®), EDM, pantograph, CNC and manual
engraving methods can be employed. Surface finishing
with glass bead or vapor blasting is common. Where
mold surfaces have been welded, a skilled engraver
can machine the weld and blend it into the original
surface. If the tool needs to be textured in an area that
has been welded, special care has to be taken both by
the welder and the texture house. If not approached
properly, the welded area will stand out visually after
texturing.

Determining the Optimal Process

After studying the project in question, an engraver
should be able to judge the best method for engraving
your molds. Certain criteria such as depth, location

Close-up of deer engraving

and character width will determine if the engraver
will use the chemical etch (Chem-Grave®), EDM,
pantograph or CNC method. Always be sure to
provide the highest quality artwork available for
details such as logos. Failure to do so can result in
additional costs.

Preparing for texture

Pricing of the texturing and engraving process is
determined by the complexity of the texture pattern
(random or geometric, depth tolerance), mold
material and complexity of the mold (size, tool
components, area to be textured and accessibility of
textured areas). Delivery also plays a role in pricing.
Because texturing and engraving is commonly the
last process before production, communication
between the processor and the texturing / engraving
vendor is critical to ensure there is enough time
available to provide a quality product. In order
to give your parts the look and feel of a quality
product, the mold engravers should be a part of any
decision on tool design for thermoforming.

x

Highly detailed tooling ready to be inserted into mold

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 13

GPEC® 2010

Sustainability &
Recycling
of Plastics:
Raising the Bar
in Today’s Economy

March 8 – 10, 2010

The Florida Hotel &
Conference Center
Orlando, Florida, USA

Program:

•
Technical Papers
•
Connections Reception
•
Exhibitions
•
Environmental
Awards
•
Student Posters
•
Clean Technology
Business Plan
Competition
•
Executive Forum on
Biobased Plastics
www.sperecycling.org

REDUCE! REUSE! RECYCLE!

14 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

n
Access to industry
knowledge from one
central location: www.
thermoformingdivision.
com.
n
Subscription to
Thermoforming
Quarterly, voted
“Publication of the YearSPE National.
n
Exposure to new ideas
and trends from across
globe. If you don’t think
your company is affecteby globalization, you nto think again.
n
New and innovative
part design at the Parts
Competition.
n
Open dialogue with the
entire industry at the
annual conference.
n
Discounts, discounts,
discounts on books,
seminars and conferencn
For managers: workshoand presentations tailorspecifically to the needsyour operators.
n
For operators: workshoand presentations that
will send you home with
new tools to improve yoperformance, make your
job easier and help the
company’s bottom line.
Join
D25
toDay!
eepeput” by
d
of
he
ed
s.
s
d
s
r

Membership Benefits

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 15

PROSPECTIVE

AUTHORS

Thermoforming
Quarterly® is an “equal
opportunity” publisher!
You will notice
that we have several
departments and feature
articles. If you have a
technical article, send
it to Barry Shepherd,
Technical Editor. All
other articles should
be sent to Conor Carlin,
Editor. Please send in
.doc format. All graphs
and photos should be
of sufficient size and
contrast to provide
a sharp printed image.

REDUCE!
REUSE!
RECYCLE!

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REUSE!
RECYCLE!

16 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

The Awards Committee is now accepting nominations for the 2010 THERMOFORMER OF THE
YEAR. Please help us by identifying worthy candidates. This prestigious honor will be awarded to
a member of our industry who has made a significant contribution to the thermoforming industry
in a technical, educational, or managerial aspect of thermoforming. Nominees will be evaluated
and voted on by the Thermoforming Board of Directors at the Spring 2010 meeting. The deadline
for submitting nominations is December 1st, 2009. Please complete the form below and include
all biographical information.
Person Nominated: ____________________________________ Title: ___________________
Firm or Institution______________________________________________________________
Street Address: ____________________________ City, State, Zip: ______________________
Telephone: _______________ Fax: _________________ E-mail: ________________________
Biographical Information:
• Nominee’s Experience in the Thermoforming Industry.
• Nominee’s Education (include degrees, year granted, name and location of university)
• Prior corporate or academic affiliations (include company and/or institutions, title, and
approximate dates of affiliations)
• Professional society affiliations
• Professional honors and awards.
• Publications and patents (please attach list).
• Evaluation of the effect of this individual’s achievement on technology and progress of
the plastics industry. (To support nomination, attach substantial documentation of these
achievements.)
• Other significant accomplishments in the field of plastics.
• Professional achievements in plastics (summarize specific achievements upon which this
nomination is based on a separate sheet).
Individual Submitting Nomination: _______________________ Title: _____________________
Firm or Institution______________________________________________________________
Street Address: ____________________________ City, State, Zip: ______________________
Telephone: _______________ Fax: _________________ E-mail: ________________________
Signature: ___________________________________________ Date: ____________________
(ALL NOMINATIONS MUST BE SIGNED)
Please submit all nominations to: Hal Gilham,
Productive Plastics, 103 West Park Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08045
halg@productiveplastics.com
Thermoformer of the Year 2010
The Awards Committee is now accepting nominations for the 2010 THERMOFORMER OF THE
YEAR. Please help us by identifying worthy candidates. This prestigious honor will be awarded to
a member of our industry who has made a significant contribution to the thermoforming industry
in a technical, educational, or managerial aspect of thermoforming. Nominees will be evaluated
and voted on by the Thermoforming Board of Directors at the Spring 2010 meeting. The deadline
for submitting nominations is December 1st, 2009. Please complete the form below and include
all biographical information.
Person Nominated: ____________________________________ Title: ___________________
Firm or Institution______________________________________________________________
Street Address: ____________________________ City, State, Zip: ______________________
Telephone: _______________ Fax: _________________ E-mail: ________________________
Biographical Information:
• Nominee’s Experience in the Thermoforming Industry.
• Nominee’s Education (include degrees, year granted, name and location of university)
• Prior corporate or academic affiliations (include company and/or institutions, title, and
approximate dates of affiliations)
• Professional society affiliations
• Professional honors and awards.
• Publications and patents (please attach list).
• Evaluation of the effect of this individual’s achievement on technology and progress of
the plastics industry. (To support nomination, attach substantial documentation of these
achievements.)
• Other significant accomplishments in the field of plastics.
• Professional achievements in plastics (summarize specific achievements upon which this
nomination is based on a separate sheet).
Individual Submitting Nomination: _______________________ Title: _____________________
Firm or Institution______________________________________________________________
Street Address: ____________________________ City, State, Zip: ______________________
Telephone: _______________ Fax: _________________ E-mail: ________________________
Signature: ___________________________________________ Date: ____________________
(ALL NOMINATIONS MUST BE SIGNED)
Please submit all nominations to: Hal Gilham,
Productive Plastics, 103 West Park Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08045
halg@productiveplastics.com
Thermoformer of the Year 2010
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 17

18 Thermoforming QUArTerLY
. Outstanding for ABS, PC/ABS, PVC and HIPS
.Weatherable and easy to fabricate
. Excellent gloss control – from flat matte to
ultra high gloss
. Chemical- , scratch- and UV-resistant
. Available in metallic, clear or any color
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Phone: 215.419.7982
Fax: 215.419.5512
E-mail:
andrew.horvath@altuglasint.com
Acrylic Capstock and Film
Capstock solutions for thermoformed sheet.
Altuglas® and Solarkote® are registered trademarks
belonging to Arkema.
© 2005 Arkema Inc. All rights reserved.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………
ISO 9001:2000
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RECYCLE!
UPCOMING
CONFERENCES
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
SEPTEMBER 19 – 21, 2010
SCHAUMBURG, ILLINOIS
SEPTEMBER 17 – 20, 2011

From the Editor

I
I
f you are an educator, student or advisor in a college or university
with a plastics program, we want to hear from you! The SPE
Thermoforming Division has a long and rich tradition of working
with academic partners. From scholarships and grants to workforce
development programs, the division seeks to promote a stronger
bond between industry and academia.

Thermoforming Quarterly is proud to publish news and stories

related to the science and business of thermoforming:

• New materials development
• New applications
• Innovative technologies
• Industry partnerships
• New or expanding laboratory facilities
• Endowments
We are also interested in hearing from our members and colleagues
around the world. If your school or institution has an international
partner, please invite them to submit relevant content.

We publish press releases, student essays, photos and technical

papers. If you would like to arrange an interview, please contact Ken
Griep, Academic Programs, at:

ken@pcmwi.com

or 608.742.7137

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 19

20 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 21

22 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Need help
with your
technical school
or college
expenses?

I
I
f you or someone you
know is working towards a career
in the plastic industry, let the SPE
Thermoforming Division help support
those education goals.

Within this past year alone, our
organization has awarded multiple
scholarships! Get involved and take
advantage of available support from
your plastic industry!

Here is a partial list of schools
and colleges whose students have
benefited from the Thermoforming
Division Scholarship Program:

• UMASS Lowell
• San Jose State
• Pittsburg State
• Penn State Erie
• University of
Wisconsin
• Michigan State
• Ferris State
• Madison
Technical College
• Clemson University
• Illinois State
• Penn College
Start by completing the application
forms at www.thermoformingdivision.
com or at www.4spe.com. x

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 23

Thermoforming

Thermoforming and Sustainability

Quarterly®

Processing Costs and Environmental Impact of Bio-plastics

Julius Vogel, Iowa State University, Materials Science and
Engineering; Dr. David Grewell, Rob Anex, Iowa State

University, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
Abstract
Introduction
Presented Materials
Methods
24 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 25

Data Review and Collection Conclusions
Acknowledgements
xData Review and Collection Conclusions
Acknowledgements
x
26 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

References
Figure 1. Cost per part comparison.
References
Figure 1. Cost per part comparison.
(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 27

Figure 2. Flow chart of recycling as end product
treatment.
Figure 3. Energy and emission savings from recycling.
Figure 4. Energy consumption of PLA production.
Figure 6. Energy consumption and CO2 emission of
plastic production.
Key Words: Life Cycle Analysis,
Bio-plastics, zein, PLA, Cradle to
Grave Analysis
(This paper was first presented at ANTEC 2009. The editors
wish to thank both the authors and the organizers for
giving us permission to reprint the article in Thermoforming
Quarterly.)
19th Annual
Thermoforming
Conference
September 18th – 21st, 2010
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
®
2010Figure 3. Energy and emission savings from recycling.
Figure 4. Energy consumption of PLA production.
Figure 6. Energy consumption and CO2 emission of
plastic production.
Key Words: Life Cycle Analysis,
Bio-plastics, zein, PLA, Cradle to
Grave Analysis
(This paper was first presented at ANTEC 2009. The editors
wish to thank both the authors and the organizers for
giving us permission to reprint the article in Thermoforming
Quarterly.)
19th Annual
Thermoforming
Conference
September 18th – 21st, 2010
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
®
2010
Figure 5. Energy consumption of zein production.

“Embrace the Challenge”

28 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

REDUCE!
REUSE!
RECYCLE!

REDUCE!
REUSE!

RECYCLE!

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 29

Roger Kipp
Councilor

COUNCIL SUMMARY ®
T
T
he June council meeting was held in
Chicago prior to ANTEC and NPE.
I was pleased to attend representing
the Thermoforming Division at the
division meeting, foundation meeting,
communications committee meeting,
as well as council. The following is a
summary of the council meeting. If you
have any questions, please feel free to
contact me.

ANTEC

ANTEC was 1,312 with the combined
ANTEC at NPE total reaching 44,000.
A total of 66 registrants attended eight
Society seminars.

Incoming President Paul Andersen’s
SPE mantra is: “Seize the Opportunity.”
An edited version of his speech will
appear as an editorial in the July/August
issue of Plastics Engineering.

Council Meeting

Council observed a moment of silence
in honor of long-time councilor Elliot
Weinberg and 1956 SPE President Jerry
Formo.

Bylaws & Policies

Bylaws 6.2.2 and 6.2.3 pertaining to
Council Meeting Times and Places and
Quorums at Council Meetings were
approved as distributed. The changes
were effective immediately to allow
electronic participation at the Council
meeting.

Bylaws 5.1, 5.3 and 5.4 pertaining
to Annual Meetings, Special Business
Meetings and Quorums at those
meetings were approved as distributed.
The changes were effective immediately
to allow electronic participation at the
Annual Meeting and Special Business
Meeting.

Bylaw 14.7 pertaining to
Participation and Voting was approved

as distributed. Bylaw 14.7 allows
electronic participation for Societylevel
committee meetings. It also states
that if the committee votes via a paper
or electronic ballot, the identity of the
voter relative to his/her vote may not be
identifiable to any SPE member.

Council approved the following
previously read and published Bylaw
and Policy changes: 6.1.3 pertaining
to Council to take effect at the end of
the meeting; 7.1 pertaining to Officers
of the Society; 7.5.5 pertaining to
the Staggering of Terms; 14.7.1.1
pertaining to the Executive Committee
Membership. Council approved as
amended Policy 022 pertaining to Vice
Presidential Transition. The amendment
allows this transition to begin in 20092010.

Council approved changes to Bylaws

4.3.12 and 4.3.13 pertaining to election
of Fellows of the Society and Honored
Service Members. Since this was a first
reading, these changes will be published
in Plastics Engineering and read again
at the next Council meeting for final
approval. The amendments allow Special
Interest Groups to nominate Fellows and
Honored Service Members.
Policy 012 pertaining to Disciplinary
Review was approved as distributed.

The full text of these Bylaws and
Policies can be found on the SPE
Council meeting extranet.

Executive Director Report & Staff
Update

SPE staff continues to work through
a host of new projects and initiatives to
keep SPE current and competitive in the
information marketplace.

Staff Restructuring

SPE underwent a planned staff
restructuring in the first quarter of 2009.
Overall full-time staff was reduced
from 26 in early 2008 to 15 as of this
writing.

Building Sale

The SPE headquarters building sale

closed on June 30, 2009. SPE moved its
offices into roughly 3,700 square feet
in Newtown, CT. At the present time,
SPE’s P.O. Box and phone numbers will
not change.

General Financial Condition

Incomes have stabilized somewhat,
but at a very depressed level.
Registrations for events, book sales and
seminars have all been hit hard in the
first quarter of this year. Membership
likewise is continuing to decline. SPE is
more reliant on its contracted publishing
revenues and incomes from NPE in
2009.

Overall Membership

Overall membership as of June 1,
2009, is 16,039. Membership acquisition
numbers continue to trail 2008 rates due
to budget challenges at SPE and the
continuing global economic situation,
which is particularly acute in many of
the industries SPE serves.

Corporate Affiliate Program

The Corporate Outreach Committee
worked last year to develop a program
to provide companies with an exclusive
opportunity to gain recognition within
the plastics industry through the Society.
The Corporate Affiliate Program is being
officially announced at ANTEC@NPE.

Technical Volumes Program

Two of the most important publishers
of technical volumes on the subjects
of plastics and polymers, Hanser and
Wiley, have joined forces with SPE to
rejuvenate this program that provides
royalty income to SPE every year in
exchange for encouraging SPE members
to publish new volumes.

Plastics Engineering Website

Wiley and Sons, Inc. has taken over
the publishing responsibilities for
SPE’s Plastics Engineering magazine,
and intends to develop an all-new web
presence for the publication at www.
plasticsengineering.com. The arrange

30 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

ment with Wiley will help make PE
more cost neutral for the next two
years. The savings generated will
begin to hit SPE’s books in June.

ANTEC® 2010

ANTEC will be held at the Orlando
World Center Marriott Resort and
Convention Center in Orlando,
Florida, May 16-20. Wiley has agreed
in principle to sell ANTEC 2010
exhibition space. Negotiations are
underway.

Virtual Conference

SPE’s first virtual conference on
failure analysis and prevention was
postponed because of low registration.
The event has been repositioned as a
Virtual Processors Conference, and
will be held October 1-2, 2009.

e-Live® Webinars

These presentations performed
moderately well through Q1 and Q2,
garnering $38,400 in sales to date.
This compares unfavorably (down
from $44K) with the same period in
2008. Attendance has ranged from 4
to 42.

SPE Foundation Update

Gail Bristol reported on the financial
health of the SPE Foundation. The
SPE Foundation awarded $138,500 in
scholarships to 33 students in 2008.

Foundation grants totaling $16,700
were made in 2008. At their April
2009 meeting, the Foundation Board
approved two new grants totaling
$5,306 for Rochester Institute of
Technology and Georgia Southern
University. RIT’s grant will help cover
the development of a biodegradability
testing laboratory. The Georgia
Southern grant will cover the
purchase of training materials for their
composites program.

Outgoing President Bill O’Connell
thanked his Executive Committee for
their hard work. Incoming President
Paul Andersen introduced his
Executive Committee. New Executive
Committee Vice Presidents are:
Russell Broome and Brent Strong.
Vijay Boolani is the 2009-2010
Secretary and James Griffing is the
2009-2010 Treasurer. x

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 31

Visit Our
Website at:
www.thermoformingdivision.com
Our mission is
to facilitate the
advancement of
thermoforming
technologies
through
education,
application,
promotion and
research.
SPE National
Executive Director
Susan Oderwald
Direct Line: 203/740-5471
Fax: 203/775-8490
email: Seoderwald@4spe.org
Conference Coordinator
Gwen Mathis
6 S. Second Street, SE
Lindale, Georgia 30147
706/235-9298
Fax: 706/295-4276
email: gmathis224@aol.com
Visit Our
Website at:
www.thermoformingdivision.com
Our mission is
to facilitate the
advancement of
thermoforming
technologies
through
education,
application,
promotion and
research.
SPE National
Executive Director
Susan Oderwald
Direct Line: 203/740-5471
Fax: 203/775-8490
email: Seoderwald@4spe.org
Conference Coordinator
Gwen Mathis
6 S. Second Street, SE
Lindale, Georgia 30147
706/235-9298
Fax: 706/295-4276
email: gmathis224@aol.com
19th Annual Thermoforming Conference
September 18th – 21st, 2010
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Midwest Airlines
Convention Center
Milwaukee,
Wisconsin
Reservations Call 1-414-271-7250
Request the SPE Rate of $149.00
For More Information, Contact:
General Chair: Clarissa Schroeder
Invista S.a.r.l
864-579-5047
Clarissa.Schroeder@invista.com
Heavy Gauge Technical Chairman
Jay Waddell
Plastic Concepts & Innovations
843-971-7833
jwaddell@plasticoncepts@com
Roll Fed Technical Chairman
Mark Strahan
Global Thermoform Training, Inc.
754-224-7513
mark@global-tti.com
Parts Competition Chairman
Bret Joslyn
Joslyn Manufacturing
330-467-8111
bret@joslyn-mfg.com
Conference Coordinator
Gwen Mathis
SPE Thermoforming Division
706-235-9298
Fax 706-295-4276
gmathis224@aol.com
Check out our website at
www.thermoformingdivision.com
®
2010
“Embrace the Challenge”
HYTAC
®
Plug Assist Materials
info@cmtmaterials.com www.cmtmaterials.com
TEL (508) 226-3901 FAX (508) 226-3902
CMT MATERIALS,INC.
Innovative
Tooling
Materials
for
Thermoforming

32 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

2009
EDITORIAL
CALENDAR

Quarterly Deadlines for
Copy and Sponsorships

ALL FINAL COPY FOR
EDITORIAL APPROVAL

15-JAN Spring 15-APR Summer
31-JUL Fall 15-OCT Winter
Post NPE Edition

All artwork to be sent in
.eps or .jpg format with
minimum 300dpi resolution.

Become a
Thermoforming
Quarterly Sponsor
in 2009!

Do you like the
new look?

Additional sponsorship
opportunities will include
4-color, full page, and
1/2 page.

RESERVE YOUR PRIME
SPONSORSHIP
SPACE TODAY.

Questions? Call or email
Laura Pichon
Ex-Tech Plastics
847-829-8124
Lpichon@extechplastics.com

BOOK SPACE
IN 2009!

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 33

Executive
Committee

2008 – 2010

CHAIR

Brian Ray
Ray Products
1700 Chablis Avenue
Ontario, CA 91761
(909) 390-9906, Ext. 216
Fax (909) 390-9984
brianr@rayplastics.com

CHAIR ELECT

Ken Griep
Portage Casting & Mold
2901 Portage Road
Portage, WI 53901
(608) 742-7137
Fax (608) 742-2199
ken@pcmwi.com

TREASURER

James Alongi
Maac Machinery
590 Tower Blvd.
Carol Stream, IL 60188
(630) 665-1700
Fax (630) 665-7799
jalongi@maacmachinery.com

SECRETARY

Mike Sirotnak
Solar Products
228 Wanaque Avenue
Pompton Lakes, NJ 07442
(973) 248-9370
Fax (973) 835-7856
msirotnak@solarproducts.com

COUNCILOR WITH TERM
ENDING ANTEC 2009

Roger Kipp
McClarin Plastics
P. O. Box 486, 15 Industrial Drive
Hanover, PA 17331
(717) 637-2241 x4003
Fax (717) 637-4811
rkipp@mcclarinplastics.com

PRIOR CHAIR

Walt Walker
Prent Corporation
P. O. Box 471, 2225 Kennedy Road
Janesville, WI 53547-0471
(608) 754-0276 x4410
Fax (608) 754-2410
wwalker@prent.com

2008 – 2010 THERMOFORMING DIVISION ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

Chair
Brian Ray
Chair Elect
Ken Griep
Finance
Bob Porsche
Technical Committees
Processing
Walt Speck
Materials
Jim Armor
Machinery
Don Kruschke
Secretary
Mike Sirotnak
Nominating
Dennis Northrop
Publications /
Advertising
Laura Pichon
Newsletter Editor
Conor Carlin
Technical Editor
Barry Shepherd
OPCOM
Lola Carere
Treasurer
James Alongi
AARC
Rich Freeman
Student Programs
Ken Griep
Councilor
Roger Kipp
Prior Chair
Walt Walker
2008 Conference
Minneapolis
Dennis Northrop
Antec
Don Hylton
Conference Coordinator
Consultant
Gwen Mathis
Membership
Haydn Forward
Marketing
Don Kruschke
Recognition
Hal Gilham
Web Site
Rich Freeman
Green Committee
Steve Hasselbach
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34 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Board of Directors
MACHINERY
COMMITTEE
James Alongi
Maac Machinery
590 Tower Blvd.
Carol Stream, IL 60188
T: 630.665.1700
F: 630.665.7799
jalongi@maacmachinery.com
Roger Fox
The Foxmor Group
373 S. Country Farm Road
Suite 202
Wheaton, IL 60187
T: 630.653.2200
F: 630.653.1474
rfox@foxmor.com
Hal Gilham
Productive Plastics, Inc.
103 West Park Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08045
T: 856.778.4300
F: 856.234.3310
halg@productiveplastics.com
Bill Kent
Brown Machine
330 North Ross Street
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.7741
F: 989.435.2821
bill.kent@brown-machine.com
Don Kruschke (Chair)
Thermoforming Machinery
Equipment (TME)
31875 Solon Road
Solon, OH 44139
T: 440.498.4000
F: 440.498.4001
donk440@gmail.com
Brian Winton
Modern Machinery
PO Box 423
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.9071
F: 989.435.3940
bwinton@modernmachineinc.com
MATERIALS
COMMITTEE
Jim Armor (Chair)
Armor & Associates
16181 Santa Barbara Lane
Huntington Beach, CA 92649
T: 714.846.7000
F: 714.846.7001
jimarmor@aol.com
Phil Barhouse
Spartech Packaging
Technologies
100 Creative Way
PO Box 128
Ripon, WI 54971
T: 920.748.1119
F: 920.748.9466
phil.barhouse@spartech.com
Donald Hylton
McConnell Company
646 Holyfield Highway
Fairburn, GA 30213
T: 678.772.5008
don@thermoforming.com
Bill McConnell
McConnell Company
3030 Sandage Street
PO Box 11512
Fort Worth, TX 76110
T: 817.926.8287
F: 817.926.8298
billmc@thermoforming.com
Dennis Northrop
Soliant, LLC
1872 Highway 9 Bypass West
Lancaster, SC 29720
T: 803.287.5535
dnorthrop@paintfilm.com
Laura Pichon
Ex-Tech Plastics
PO Box 576
11413 Burlington Road
Richmond, IL 60071
T: 847.829.8124
F: 815.678.4248
lpichon@extechplastics.com
Clarissa Schroeder
Invista S.A.R.L
1550 Dewberry Road
Spartanburg, SC 29307
T: 864.579.5047
F: 864.579.5288
Clarissa.Schroeder@invista.com
Robert G. Porsche
General Plastics
2609 West Mill Road
Milwaukee, WI 53209
T: 414.351.1000
F: 414.351.1284
bob@genplas.com
Barry Shepherd
Shepherd Thermoforming
5 Abacus Way
Brampton, ONT L6T 5B7
T: 905.459.4545
F: 905.459.6746
bshep@shepherd.ca
Walt Speck (Chair)
Speck Plastics, Inc.
PO Box 421
Nazareth, PA 18064
T: 610.759.1807
F: 610.759.3916
wspeck@speckplastics.com
Jay Waddell
Plastics Concepts & Innovations
1127 Queensborough Road
Suite 102
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
T: 843.971.7833
F: 843.216.6151
jwaddell@plasticoncepts.com
PROCESSING
COMMITTEE
Art Buckel
McConnell Company
3452 Bayonne Drive
San Diego, CA 92109
T: 858.273.9620
F: 858.273.6837
artbuckel@thermoforming.com
Lola Carere
Thermopro
1600 Cross Point Way
Suite D
Duluth, GA 30097
T: 678.957.3220
F: 678.475.1747
lcarere@thermopro.com
Haydn Forward
Specialty Manufacturing Co.
6790 Nancy Ridge Road
San Diego, CA 92121
T: 858.450.1591
F: 858.450.0400
hforward@smi-mfg.com
Richard Freeman
Freetech Plastics
2211 Warm Springs Court
Fremont, CA 94539
T: 510.651.9996
F: 510.651.9917
rfree@freetechplastics.com
Ken Griep
Portage Casting & Mold
2901 Portage Road
Portage, WI 53901
T: 608.742.7137
F: 608.742.2199
ken@pcmwi.com
Steve Hasselbach
CMI Plastics
222 Pepsi Way
Ayden, NC 28416
T: 252.746.2171
F: 252.746.2172
steve@cmiplastics.com
Bret Joslyn
Joslyn Manufacturing
9400 Valley View Road
Macedonia, OH 44056
T: 330.467.8111
F: 330.467.6574
bret@joslyn-mfg.com
Stephen Murrill
Profile Plastics
65 S. Waukegan
Lake Bluff, IL 60044
T: 847.604.5100 x29
F: 847.604.8030
smurrill@thermoform.com
Board of Directors
MACHINERY
COMMITTEE
James Alongi
Maac Machinery
590 Tower Blvd.
Carol Stream, IL 60188
T: 630.665.1700
F: 630.665.7799
jalongi@maacmachinery.com
Roger Fox
The Foxmor Group
373 S. Country Farm Road
Suite 202
Wheaton, IL 60187
T: 630.653.2200
F: 630.653.1474
rfox@foxmor.com
Hal Gilham
Productive Plastics, Inc.
103 West Park Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08045
T: 856.778.4300
F: 856.234.3310
halg@productiveplastics.com
Bill Kent
Brown Machine
330 North Ross Street
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.7741
F: 989.435.2821
bill.kent@brown-machine.com
Don Kruschke (Chair)
Thermoforming Machinery
Equipment (TME)
31875 Solon Road
Solon, OH 44139
T: 440.498.4000
F: 440.498.4001
donk440@gmail.com
Brian Winton
Modern Machinery
PO Box 423
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.9071
F: 989.435.3940
bwinton@modernmachineinc.com
MATERIALS
COMMITTEE
Jim Armor (Chair)
Armor & Associates
16181 Santa Barbara Lane
Huntington Beach, CA 92649
T: 714.846.7000
F: 714.846.7001
jimarmor@aol.com
Phil Barhouse
Spartech Packaging
Technologies
100 Creative Way
PO Box 128
Ripon, WI 54971
T: 920.748.1119
F: 920.748.9466
phil.barhouse@spartech.com
Donald Hylton
McConnell Company
646 Holyfield Highway
Fairburn, GA 30213
T: 678.772.5008
don@thermoforming.com
Bill McConnell
McConnell Company
3030 Sandage Street
PO Box 11512
Fort Worth, TX 76110
T: 817.926.8287
F: 817.926.8298
billmc@thermoforming.com
Dennis Northrop
Soliant, LLC
1872 Highway 9 Bypass West
Lancaster, SC 29720
T: 803.287.5535
dnorthrop@paintfilm.com
Laura Pichon
Ex-Tech Plastics
PO Box 576
11413 Burlington Road
Richmond, IL 60071
T: 847.829.8124
F: 815.678.4248
lpichon@extechplastics.com
Clarissa Schroeder
Invista S.A.R.L
1550 Dewberry Road
Spartanburg, SC 29307
T: 864.579.5047
F: 864.579.5288
Clarissa.Schroeder@invista.com
Robert G. Porsche
General Plastics
2609 West Mill Road
Milwaukee, WI 53209
T: 414.351.1000
F: 414.351.1284
bob@genplas.com
Barry Shepherd
Shepherd Thermoforming
5 Abacus Way
Brampton, ONT L6T 5B7
T: 905.459.4545
F: 905.459.6746
bshep@shepherd.ca
Walt Speck (Chair)
Speck Plastics, Inc.
PO Box 421
Nazareth, PA 18064
T: 610.759.1807
F: 610.759.3916
wspeck@speckplastics.com
Jay Waddell
Plastics Concepts & Innovations
1127 Queensborough Road
Suite 102
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
T: 843.971.7833
F: 843.216.6151
jwaddell@plasticoncepts.com
PROCESSING
COMMITTEE
Art Buckel
McConnell Company
3452 Bayonne Drive
San Diego, CA 92109
T: 858.273.9620
F: 858.273.6837
artbuckel@thermoforming.com
Lola Carere
Thermopro
1600 Cross Point Way
Suite D
Duluth, GA 30097
T: 678.957.3220
F: 678.475.1747
lcarere@thermopro.com
Haydn Forward
Specialty Manufacturing Co.
6790 Nancy Ridge Road
San Diego, CA 92121
T: 858.450.1591
F: 858.450.0400
hforward@smi-mfg.com
Richard Freeman
Freetech Plastics
2211 Warm Springs Court
Fremont, CA 94539
T: 510.651.9996
F: 510.651.9917
rfree@freetechplastics.com
Ken Griep
Portage Casting & Mold
2901 Portage Road
Portage, WI 53901
T: 608.742.7137
F: 608.742.2199
ken@pcmwi.com
Steve Hasselbach
CMI Plastics
222 Pepsi Way
Ayden, NC 28416
T: 252.746.2171
F: 252.746.2172
steve@cmiplastics.com
Bret Joslyn
Joslyn Manufacturing
9400 Valley View Road
Macedonia, OH 44056
T: 330.467.8111
F: 330.467.6574
bret@joslyn-mfg.com
Stephen Murrill
Profile Plastics
65 S. Waukegan
Lake Bluff, IL 60044
T: 847.604.5100 x29
F: 847.604.8030
smurrill@thermoform.com
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 35

Thermoforming
Quarterly®
THIRD QUARTER 2009
VOLUME 28 n NUMBER 3
Sponsor Index These sponsors enable us to publish Thermoforming Quarterly
Thermoforming
Quarterly®
THIRD QUARTER 2009
VOLUME 28 n NUMBER 3
Sponsor Index These sponsors enable us to publish Thermoforming Quarterly
n Allen ………………………… 18
n Advanced Ventures in

Technology …………….. 29
n Arkema / Altuglas………… 18
n Brown Machine ……………. 31
n CMT Materials …………….. 32
n Edward D. Segen…………. 18
n Euromold …Inside Back Cover
n Frimo ……………………….. 19
n Future Mold ……………….. 29
n GN Plastics ………………… 29
n Kiefel ……………………….. 16
n Kydex ……………. Back Cover
n KMT Robotic Solutions …… 36
n Maac Machinery …………… 33
n McClarin Plastics………….. 29
n Modern Machinery ……….. 29
n Monark ……………………… 31
n Onsrud Cutter …………….. 19
n PCI ………………………….. 16
n PMC …………………………. 33
n Portage Casting & Mold ….. 14
n Primex Plastics ……………. 16
n Profile Plastics Corp. …….. 18
n Protherm …………………… 15
n PTi …………………………… 15
n Ray Products ………………. 18
n Solar Products…………….. 36
n Tempco ………………………. 9
n Thermwood………………… 14
n Tooling Technology ……….. 23
n TPS …………………………. 23
n Ultra-Metric Tool ………….. 34
n WECO ………………………. 15
n Wisconsin Engraving …….. 14
n Xaloy, Inc. …………………. 23
n Yushin America ……….. Inside

Front Cover
n Zed Industries…………….. 18

36 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

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