Quarterly Mags: 2009 4th

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Quarterly®
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NSIDE …IA JOURNAL OF THE THERMOFORMING DIVISION OF THE SOCIETY OF PLASTIC ENGINEERS FOURTH QUARTER 2009 n VOLUME 28 n NUMBER 4
The Business Case for Sustainability page 8
Clamshells vs Bottles: PET Recycling page 18
Resin Life Cycle Estimation page 28
®
TheSUSTAINABILITYIssueWWW.THERMOFORMINGDIVISION.COM
Quarterly®
Thermoforming
NSIDE …IA JOURNAL OF THE THERMOFORMING DIVISION OF THE SOCIETY OF PLASTIC ENGINEERS FOURTH QUARTER 2009 n VOLUME 28 n NUMBER 4
The Business Case for Sustainability page 8
Clamshells vs Bottles: PET Recycling page 18
Resin Life Cycle Estimation page 28
®
TheSUSTAINABILITYIssue

Thermoforming
Quarterly®
FOURTH QUARTER 2009
VOLUME 28 n NUMBER 4
Contents
n
Departments
Chairman’s Corner x 2
Thermoforming in

the News x 4
The Business of
Thermoforming x 8
Thermoforming and Sustainability x
28

The
SUSTAINABILITY
Issue
Front Cover
n
Features
Lead Technical Article x
6

Automatic Savings Plan

Thermoforming 2.0 x
14

Ultrasonic Sealing and Cutting in Thermoforming

Industry Practice x
18

This PET’s a Big Blue-Box Problem

n
In This Issue
University News x
20
2010 Editorial Calendar x 33
Sponsorship x
36

Page 20
Thermoforming
Quarterly®
A JOURNAL PUBLISHED EACH CALENDAR
QUARTER BY THE
THERMOFORMING DIVISION
OF THE SOCIETY OF PLASTICS ENGINEERS

Editor

Conor Carlin

(617) 771-3321
cpcarlin@gmail.com
Technical Editor

Barry Shepherd

(905) 459-4545 Ext. 229
Fax (905) 459-6746
bshep@shepherd.ca
Sponsorships

Laura Pichon

(847) 829-8124
Fax (815) 678-4248
lpichon@extechplastics.com
Conference Coordinator

Gwen Mathis

(706) 235-9298
Fax (706) 295-4276
gmathis224@aol.com
Thermoforming Quarterly® is published
four times annually as an informational
and educational bulletin to
the members of the Society of Plastics
Engineers, Thermoforming Division, and the
thermoforming industry. The name, “Thermoforming
Quarterly®” and its logotype,
are registered trademarks of the Thermoforming
Division of the Society of Plastics
Engineers, Inc. No part of this publication
may be reproduced in any form or by any
means without prior written permission of
the publisher, copyright holder. Opinions of
the authors are their own, and the publishers
cannot be held responsible for opinions or
representations of any unsolicited material.
Printed in the U.S.A.

Thermoforming Quarterly® is registered
in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
(Registration no. 2,229,747). x

Cover photo courtesy of
European BioPlastics
All Rights Reserved 2009
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 1

Thermoforming
Quarterly® Chairman’s Corner
Brian Ray
T
he Society of the
Plastics Industry (SPI) and
its member companies define
sustainability as a balance of
protecting the natural systems of
the planet, providing high quality
of life for all people, and fostering
global competition, economic
freedom, and growing prosperity
for all. SPI advocates continuous
innovation and improvement in
applying sustainability principles
in the manufacturing, distribution,
use and disposition of plastic
materials. The Thermoforming
Division is committed to providing
its members with information, data
and educational opportunities that
will have a positive impact on the
(triple) bottom line. In this issue,
we offer a foreword by board
member Phil Barhouse of Spartech
Packaging Technologies.

Brian Ray
Chair

Facing the Sustainability
Challenge

Within the thermoforming
industry, there continues to
be confusion and challenges
regarding sustainability and
understanding the complexity
of sustainable solutions. These
complexities are broadened
by the significant volume of
misinformation and green-washing
campaigns based on loose or
unsubstantiated claims. There
are several challenges facing
thermoformers attempting to
implement sustainable programs
aimed at creating environmental
benefit while providing value
to their customers. To achieve
this level of success requires
a comprehensive strategic
program that covers all aspects
of sustainability. Today’s
thermoformers will benefit
from a strategic approach to
implementing sustainability within
their organizations and an indepth
understanding of sustainable
material attributes and solutions.

Benchmarking sustainability
programs from leading companies
such as Proctor & Gamble, SC
Johnson and HP gives us a better
understanding of how these
strategic programs are constructed.
You may also consider companies
within our own industry. For
example, Spartech’s Corporate
Sustainability program consists
of four pillars: Environmental,
Health and Safety, Social

Responsibly and Technology.
The Environmental team focuses
on reduction of the corporation’s
footprint through energy, waste
and GHG emissions management.
The Health and Safety pillar
involves the certification of each
plant to Spartech’s Health and
Safety management system. The
Social Responsibility group gives
back to the community through
volunteerism and charitable
giving. The final area, Technology,
looks at bringing new, more
sustainable materials to market.
These materials may involve
bio-renewable, recycled and or
recyclable products. Together,
these four pillars were developed
not only for the benefit of our
internal sustainable programs, but
also our customers’ programs.

Using accredited resources
available today through
industry and trade connections,
thermoformers can drive value to
implement a successful strategic
sustainability program. The SPE
Thermoforming Division, through
its Board, technical committees
and this publication, is committed
to providing those resources to
its members. In this issue, you
will find several articles that are
specific to sustainability and
thermoforming and we hope
you will find them informative
and helpful as you develop your
sustainability platform. x

~ Phil Barhouse
Spartech Packaging Technologies

2 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Roger Lichtle
Dolco Packaging
Decatur, IN
Patrick Madigan
Accutech Packaging Inc.
Foxboro, MA
Christopher J. Manea
ShapeMaster Inc.
Ogden, IL
Dallas, TX
Solon, OH
Greg Riley
Broadview, IL
Caryl Ritz
United Space Alliance
Cape Canaveral, FL
Why Join?
®
Why Not?
It has never been more important to be a member
of your professional society than now, in the current
climate of change and volatility in the plastics
industry. Now, more than ever, the information you
access and the personal networks you create can and
will directly impact your future and your career.
Active membership in SPE – keeps you current, keeps
you informed, and keeps you connected.
The question really isn’t “why join?” but …
Thermoforming
Quarterly® New Members
Ian Arnold
Package Development Corporation
Kansas City, KS
Pietro Barteselli
Jacuzzi Europe Spa
Valvasone, Italy
Randy Burcham
Burcham Int’l. Corp.
Nokomis, FL
Kenneth B. Cooley, Jr.
Shapemaster Inc.
Ogden, IL
Costa Cruz
Five Star Fabricating Inc.
Twin Lakes, WI
Willard G. Cutler
C & C Thermoforming Inc.
Palmer, MA
Daniel Dantus
Dimension Espacio SA De CV
Naucalpan, EDO, Mexico
Michael J. Drozda
MWV
Glen Allen, VA
Richard Dyble
Panoramic Inc.
Janesville, WI
Jill Goldbach
General Mills, Inc.
Minneapolis, MN
Kimberly Gotte
Innovative Plastech Inc.
Batavia, IL
Gary Kuzniar
USDA ARS
Peoria, IL
Sergio Scigliano
Delker
Roger Lichtle
Dolco Packaging
Decatur, IN
Patrick Madigan
Accutech Packaging Inc.
Foxboro, MA
Christopher J. Manea
ShapeMaster Inc.
Ogden, IL
Dallas, TX
Solon, OH
Greg Riley
Broadview, IL
Caryl Ritz
United Space Alliance
Cape Canaveral, FL
Why Join?
®
Why Not?
It has never been more important to be a member
of your professional society than now, in the current
climate of change and volatility in the plastics
industry. Now, more than ever, the information you
access and the personal networks you create can and
will directly impact your future and your career.
Active membership in SPE – keeps you current, keeps
you informed, and keeps you connected.
The question really isn’t “why join?” but …
Thermoforming
Quarterly® New Members
Ian Arnold
Package Development Corporation
Kansas City, KS
Pietro Barteselli
Jacuzzi Europe Spa
Valvasone, Italy
Randy Burcham
Burcham Int’l. Corp.
Nokomis, FL
Kenneth B. Cooley, Jr.
Shapemaster Inc.
Ogden, IL
Costa Cruz
Five Star Fabricating Inc.
Twin Lakes, WI
Willard G. Cutler
C & C Thermoforming Inc.
Palmer, MA
Daniel Dantus
Dimension Espacio SA De CV
Naucalpan, EDO, Mexico
Michael J. Drozda
MWV
Glen Allen, VA
Richard Dyble
Panoramic Inc.
Janesville, WI
Jill Goldbach
General Mills, Inc.
Minneapolis, MN
Kimberly Gotte
Innovative Plastech Inc.
Batavia, IL
Gary Kuzniar
USDA ARS
Peoria, IL
Sergio Scigliano
Delker
Russell J. Martin
Dolco Packaging
Steve Martineau
Component Molding, LLC
Hamden, CT
Fred T. Mooney
Pactiv Corporation
Lake Forest, IL
Ciaran P. O’Connor
Queen’s University Belfast
Belfast, Ireland
Filiberto V. Orona
Mabe SA de CV
Quetetaro, CP, Mexico
Tony Petrelli
CardPak Inc.
Summit Manufacturing Pty. Ltd.
Huntingwood, NSW, Australia
Victor K. Rimkevicius
Wilbert Plastic Services
Itu, SsaoPpaulo, Brazil
Butch Segura
Segura Trading
Lafayette, LA
Manuel Serrano
Mexico
Lisa Sestak
Partners Alliance
Cranberry Township, PA
Wesley Skinner
Tucson, AZ
Aric Slavin
Dordan Manufacturing Inc.
Woodstock, IL
Ian Stevens
Manrex Pty. Ltd.
Five Dock, NSW, Australia
Clark Stoel
Fey Industries
Edgerton, MN
Ben R. Stover
Bemis
Fremont, OH
Alison J. Svoboda
Boda Corporation
Deer Park, IL
William Taylor
New Palestine, IN
Oussama Zebdi
Montreal, QC, Canada
Bin Zhu
The Ohio State University
Columbus, OH
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 3

Thermoforming in the news
Bio4Pack Offers One-Stop Shopping

Editor’s Note: This story first appeared in
“Bioplastics Magazine,” Vol. 4, 2009.
It is reprinted here with kind permission
of the editor, Dr. M. Thielen.

wo Dutch thermoformingT

companies, Nedupak

Thermoforming (Rheden,

Netherlands) and Plastics2Pack

(Uden, Netherlands), recently

announced the formation of

“Bio4Pack,” a new packaging

supply company. The new

entity is headed by Managing

Director Patrick Gerritsen, who

brings with him several years of

expertise in the area of bio-based

and biodegradable packaging.

Bio4Pack not only offers

thermoformed packaging but

also various other kinds of

packaging made from bio-based

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and/or biodegradable materials
including films, bags and netting.
They also offer sugarcane trays
made from bagasse, a by-product
of sugar manufacturing.

“We want to offer our customers
a total packaging solution,” says
Oliver Fraajie, Commercial
Director of Nedupack, “not
just a thermoformed tray or
bulk pack.” The portfolio of
Bio4Pack comprises the traditional
thermoformed packaging made
from bioplastics such as PLA
and other new thermoformable
materials.

The range also includes films
and bags for all kinds of purposes,

e.g. shopping bags or flow wrap
packaging made from starchbased
bioplastics such as Biolice®,
Materbi® or Bioflex® from FKUR,
as well as nets for produce and
labeling materials.
“We also offer meat packaging
consisting of a thermoformed
PLA tray with peelable SiOx
coated PLA film, having the
same properties as conventional
packaging,” adds Frank
Eijkman, Managing Director of
Plastics2Pack. “And for bakery
goods such as cakes and cookies
we have thermoformed trays and
folded boxes from a more rigid
PLA sheet. This kind of box is also
available for the packaging of biochocolate,
for example.”

Blisters for liquor gift packs
or batteries round of the list of
examples. “In a nutshell, we are

a trading company that offers
all types of packaging made
from bio-based or biodegradable
materials,” says Gerritsen. “Those
that we don’t produce ourselves at
Nedupack or Plastics2Pack, we get
from partners.”

All products are certified
according to EN 13432 and
Gerritsen goes one step further:
“We are investigating the
possibility of having our products
certified and labeled “Climate
Neutral” (www.climatepartner.de).

Bio4Pack started operations in
August and has received orders
from leading companies in the
fresh produce and supermarket
industries. While the company
plans to begin marketing in
Europe, clients from all over
the world can be served by
Nedupack’s partners in many
countries. Nedupack has the added
flexibility of internal design and
tool-making departments which
allows for fast reaction times.

Although the new company was
founded during difficult economic
times, the entrepreneurs have full
confidence in the development
of this market. “We are looking
forward to convincing more and
more supermarkets and other
suppliers to switch to bioplastics,
and not only because traditional
sources are finite,” says Gerritsen.
Fraaije is convinced that “the
customers who buy bio-food
are also willing to buy biopackaging.”
x

4 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

PROSPECTIVE

AUTHORS

Thermoforming
Quarterly® is an “equal
opportunity” publisher!
You will notice
that we have several
departments and feature
articles. If you have a
technical article, send
it to Barry Shepherd,
Technical Editor. All
other articles should
be sent to Conor Carlin,
Editor. Please send in
.doc format. All graphs
and photos should be
of sufficient size and
contrast to provide
a sharp printed image.

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Thermoforming QUArTerLY 5

Thermoforming

Lead Technical Article

Quarterly®

Automatic Savings Plan

Chris Parrillo, Yushin America, Inc.

A
A
s competitive forces rapidly accelerate, most
thermoformers agree that automation is the key
to maximizing savings. Today, thermoformers apply
direct and indirect labor to remove, test, package and
transfer parts throughout their organization. In order
to remain competitive, thermoforming companies
must reduce these costs as much as possible, while
continuing to increase quality and productivity. The
best way this can be accomplished is through the
installation of automated work cells that employ highspeed
servo robots.

Forces Driving Automation

While costs associated with manufacturing products
in the United States continue to grow at an exponential
rate, thermoforming companies must continually work
to minimize their expenses. Companies are being asked
not only to produce quality parts at costs competitive
with low wage countries, but also to lower costs over
the life of their contracts. Robots have consistently
provided an immediate impact on reducing labor costs
while increasing productivity and quality.

Robot Configuration

The advantages of the Cartesian-style servo robot
include configuration, speed, accuracy, reliability, ease
of use, and flexibility. A Cartesian or linear robot is an
industrial robot whose three main axes (X, Y, and Z)
are linear so they move in a straight line rather than in
a rotational movement like an articulated robot arm.

The main advantage of the high-speed servo robot
over other types of automated work- handling systems
is that a servo robot is capable of quickly driving to any
point along its three axes while constantly monitoring
and correcting its position. Robots are fast and flexible
and they can be quickly and easily reprogrammed or
retooled. The linear design of the Cartesian-style robot

has proven to be extremely effective for the extraction
and stacking of thermoformed parts.

Robots can be configured to run parallel with or
perpendicular to the sheet line. The robot mounting
frame and integrated safety guarding are designed in
a way that allows seamless integration to the existing
machine design. The direct linear motion of the robot
matching the product flow offers simplicity of controls
and programming with high-speed motion.

The robot interface creates a ‘handshake’ with the
thermoforming machine and it is programmed to wait
directly above the sheet line to pick the formed products.
The robot is capable of accurately tracking the sheet
as it is fed from a trim in place machine or picking
trimmed products from an up-stacker, a machine bed,
or a conveyor.

Speed and Efficiency

Robots employ ultra high-speed motors on all
three axes and incorporate rounding motions into the
automatic stacking routines to achieve 17-20 cycles per
minute (depending on the part geometry and strokes).
Reliable, consistent, controlled part handling reduces
scrap rates and part count errors.

Robots utilizing belt-drive technology and sealed
bearings require minimal lubrication and can run
non-stop for extended periods of time. A robot with a
clean operating design is essential for success in highspec,
cleanroom applications where food and medical
products are produced.

Ease of Use

One of the characteristics a robot controller offers
is an easy-to-use graphical operator interface. The
design of the controller is balanced to incorporate cost,
operator interface, programmability, capacity for data
storage and future expandability. The interface should
allow all functions to be accessed and understood
with minimal training and a short learning curve. The

6 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

controller incorporates functions that include set up,
troubleshooting, cycling and monitoring.

The graphical interface allows the user to operate
the robot without having any previous robot controller
experience. The graphical interface displays robot
and other important functions on the screen, greatly

Figure 1. Screen shot of graphical interface showing robotic
axis.

reducing training, downtime and changeover/set
up times. Technical staff can easily perform mold
changes, machine setup or creation of new sequences
or programs.

Mold data (positions, speeds, and timers) is stored
for quick retrieval of sequences, thus eliminating the
need for reprogramming. However, robots can also
be easily reprogrammed or retooled offering reduced
mold changeover times and short production runs.

End-of-arm tooling can be designed to either
handle several different products (adjustable) or to be
dedicated. Adjustable tooling can be a cost-effective
alternative to having dedicated end of arm tooling
for each product or mold. The robot is equipped with
programmable stack height, 180-degree rotational
stacking or A/B/C stacking capabilities.

Thermoformers must continue to use technology and
automation to achieve higher quality at a lower cost.
As thermoformers increasingly embrace automation,
competition for new work will depend on the ability
to compete and bid for new jobs. Using automation
to remain efficient and keep up with competitive
forces will be an essential element of survival for
thermoformers both now and in the future. x

Figure 3. 3D rendering
of end-of-arm picker

Figure 2. Screen shot of graphical interface with
training function.

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 7

assembly.

Thermoforming
Quarterly®

The Business of Thermoforming

The Business Case for Sustainability

Margaret H. Baumann, G.H. Associates, Lebanon, NJ

Abstract

This paper will try to establish a
business case for sustainability by
defining “sustainability” as a net
energy reduction when an LCA (Life
Cycle Analysis) is done. This means
we must reduce our overall footprint
(carbon and ecological) in terms of
how much of the earth’s resources
we use and how much damage we
leave behind. By making this the
strategic objective sustainability
becomes “good business.” If we
take this objective seriously what
are the implications for the plastics
industry?

Introduction

In the last couple of years the
words “sustainability” and “green”
has become part of the mainstream
vernacular. Manufacturers, marketers
and consumers are all taking
a more serious look at the meaning
of “sustainability” in their business
plans. There are still a lot of
misconceptions regarding just what
sustainability means. How do you
define sustainability? What does
having a neutral or negative carbon
footprint really mean and why does
it matter?

In 1789 Thomas Jefferson wrote
the first definition of sustainability.
“Then I say the earth belongs to each
generation during its course fully
and in its own right. The second
generation receives it clear of the
debts and encumbrances, the third of
the second, and so on. For if the first
could charge it with a debt, and then
the earth would belong to the dead
and not to the living generation.
Then, no generation can contract
debts greater than may be paid

(Editor’s Note: This paper was first presented at NPE 2009.
It is reprinted here with the kind permission of SPI.)

during the course of its own existence.
Jefferson’s quote was updated for our
times in 1987 when Gro Harlem Brundt
restated it as “ … [our] generation must
meet the needs of the present without
compromising the ability of future
generations to meet their own needs.”
Right now, due to the perfect storm of
geo-political events, our generation
must take seriously the need and
advantage of the opportunity for more
sustainable usage of our resources.

In the book, Hot, Flat and Crowded,
Thomas Friedman makes the case for
“why we need a green revolution and
how it can renew America.” The first
half of the book is a diagnosis of the
unique energy, climate and biodiversity
challenges the world faces. Friedman
suggests the world is getting hot, flat
and crowded due to tightening energy
supplies, the intensifying extinction of
plants and animals, deepening energy
poverty and accelerating climate
change. The second half of the book
is how we can meet those challenges.
The challenges he describes effectively
in the book are an opportunity for
America and especially the plastics
industry. America is always at its
most powerful and most influential
when it is combining innovation
and inspiration, wealth building
and dignity building. We agree with
Thomas Friedman’s thesis that it is
hard to imagine an acceptable solution
to the issues our earth is facing without
the leadership of the U.S. politically,
technically and economically. We
have the opportunity to become the
world’s leader in innovating clean
power, energy systems and renewable
materials. By addressing these three
areas in earnest we can begin to solve
the problems facing out world today.
Although the plastics industry alone
does not hold the keys to all the

solutions, it certainly can play a major
role and it is important for our industry
to continue to contribute to innovation
in this area.

Energy

Even though the price of a barrel
of oil has decreased since early 2008,
the pressure should remain on short-,
medium- and long-term strategies to
reduce the amount of energy we use.
Short-term we need more sources of
domestic oil. However, we cannot
retain short-term thinking here. We
need to plan and develop alternative
energy sources- these are areas that the
plastics industry is already contributing
to as part of the solution.

For example, DuPont and others are
working on solar cell technology to
both improve its performance and cost.
Polymer technology is one of the most
promising of the fuel cell approaches.
Polymer composites contribute to
wind turbine manufacturing, another
technology being used as an alternative
energy source. One of the biggest
challenges facing our planet is finding
ways to convert our conventional
industrial processes that use nonrenewable
feedstock into processes
that are eco-efficient. At present, more
than 85% of the United States’ energy
supply is fossil-based with less than 4%
coming from solar, wind, geothermal
and biomass, 8% coming from nuclear
and 4% coming from hydro.

Currently hydro energy constitutes
almost half (48%) of the renewable
energy used in the U.S., but that figure
is expected to decline as concerns
over water shortage continue. The
next largest segment is biomass
(44%) comprised primarily of lumber
company waste. In Friedman’s book,
he describes the utilities industry

8 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

(the largest user of oil as an energy
generation source) as being at an
energy “all you can eat” buffet. He
recommends that the utilities industry
of the near future should be more
demand-based, i.e. incentives should
be in place to make the industry
more sensitive to demand inputs. He
suggests that a solution would be
smarter systems or those that recognize
lower periods of electricity demand
and run their functions then. Energy
efficiency should be the goal of any
technology developed for the market
today. We should not fund technology
that doesn’t promise a reduced carbon
footprint or net energy efficiency. The
plastics industry has the know-how
to help in this area as well. Friedman
concludes that we are entering a new
Era of Energy where we need to focus
our technology research on solutions
for managing both the increasing
global energy requirements and the
continuing stewardship of the earth for
future generations.

Green Chemistry and

Carbon Footprint

A report written by the DOE and
USDA in 2001 highlighted the need
not only for investment by public/
private partnerships but also for
the use of integrated R&D to foster
innovation in bio-based materials.
Currently there are more than 250
companies in the U.S. producing
a variety of bio-based products. A
number of these companies were
fostered by the federally mandated use
of recycled products and by the low
cost agricultural availability of the
starting materials. Conversion to biobased
products would provide more
income to agriculture and forestry
producers and processors. It offers one
more tool to conventional approaches
to materials and energy.

European BioPlastics estimates that
annual global production of bio-plastics
will increase six-fold to 1.5 million
tons by 2011, up from 262,000 tons
in 2007. The volume in 2007 includes
bio-renewables as well as bio-based.
This will still be only about 0.7% of
the Petrochemical-based plastics used

today. The table below lists the current
producers of bio-based plastics.

Bio-based Definitions

One recent challenge has been
to develop common standards and
definitions for bio-based products. For

a product to be bio-based, it must
be organic and contain in whole or
part carbon from biological sources
as opposed to petrochemical based
carbon. As shown in Figure 2, the
C14 signature forms the basis for
identifying and quantifying bio-

Source: Jim Lunt and Associates LLC
PLA – Polylactic Acid Polymer; PHA – Polyhydroxyalkanoates; PHBV – Polyhydroxybutyrate-
co-hydroxyvalerate; Materbi (Starch); Cereplast – compounder of
starch and PLA blends; HDPE – High Density PE

based content. Plants and animals that
utilize carbon in biological food chains
take up C14 during their lifetimes. As
soon as the plant or animal dies there
is no replenishment of radioactive
carbon, only decay. Since the half life
of carbon is around 5730 years, the
fossil feedstocks formed over millions
of years will have no C14 signature.
By using this methodology one can
identify and quantify bio-based
content. ASTM has developed test
method D6866 for bio-based content.

Reducing the Carbon

Footprint Using LCA

(Life Cycle Analysis)

Life cycle analysis is a good way to
quantify and measure the sustainability
of products. ISO 14040 or ASTM
D7075 standards address LCA.
LCA involves the compilation of a
comprehensive inventory (Life Cycle
Inventory or LCI) of relevant inputs
and outputs of a production system.
This involves an organized effort to
measure specific input components
contributing to the production and
delivery of the material to its enduse
application. In addition, an LCA
requires an evaluation and assessment

of the environmental impacts
associated with the processes. LCA
represents the best method available
to help define R&D goals and
economic and environmental targets.
R&D on current bio-based polymers
needs to be focused on continued
reduction of the carbon footprint
either through energy efficiency or
raw materials which have a smaller
carbon footprint. Figure 3 compares
the carbon footprint for PLA and
where the research on PLA is aimed
at reducing its carbon footprint.
Figure 4 illustrates what is expected
when bio-based PP is compared to
current petrochemically based PP

– there is a significant reduction in
CO2 emissions.
Industrial
Biotechnology

Lower capital expenditures, lower
raw material costs, the ability to create
new functionality and the promise
of low environmental footprint
are all potential benefits which are
motivating the increased research
in the field of biotechnology and
industrial chemicals. Even though

(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 9

chemicals and plastics only account
for about 13% of fossil fuel usage, it
offers the promise of reduced carbon
footprint by replacing old carbon with
new carbon. Both Dow Chemical
and Braskem (Brazil) are planning to
bring bio-based polyethylene plants
(sugar cane bagasse) by 2009-2010.

The benefits of industrial biotech
are numerous. In addition to reduced
dependency on oil based derivatives,
bio-technically based chemicals and
polymers have faster cycle times, low
cost bio-feedstocks, more efficient
bio-processes and more means
of production than conventional
processes. The bio-based materials
however have different handling
characteristics. Some commercial
products that use bio-energy or are
bio-based products include biopolymers
(PLA, PDO, and PHAs),
fuel (bio-ethanol), chemicals (ethyl
lactate, succinic acid and lactic
acid) and lignin. Experts believe
that biotechnology will play a big
role in many markets-drugs and
vitamins, textiles, leather, pulp
and paper, mining, metal refining,
electro-plating, molded goods, film
packaging and fibers. Industrial
Biotechnology is becoming attractive
from a business perspective because
it:

•
Decreases production costs
•
Increases sustainability profile
•
Allows broader use of agricultural
feedstocks instead of petroleum
•
Provides precision catalysis
•
New bio-catalysts constantly
being discovered
•
Not controversial like medical
biotech
•
Bio-based polymers with
enhanced or added value
properties
The continued research in making
bio-based materials more valuable
is centered on the utilization of
non-food based raw materials like
biomass and alternative energy for
powering the plants contributing to
the successful management of the
carbon footprint.

Conclusions

The Plastics Industry has and
needs to continue to contribute to
“sustainable products and systems”.
Polymer solutions continue to improve
alternative energy technology whether
solar, wind, fuel or other alternatives.
Recycled content polymers and
composites contribute to energy
savings and raw material efficiency.
Bio-based polymers continue to
improve in their performance and
reduced carbon footprint. R&D needs
to remain focused on net energy
efficiency and Life Cycle Analysis
(LCA) as tools to measure the progress
of sustainable solutions.

In our current environment and
world role, the US plastics industry
needs to make sustainability “good
business” by addressing the multiple
challenges of energy sources, climate
change and growing middle class. We
need to keep this front and center as
we decide where we focus our human
capital and resources. x

References

1.
Industrial Biotechnology
and Nanotechnology, G. H.
Associates, 2004, ANTEC
proceedings.
Figure 1.

2.
Friedman, Thomas L. Hot, Flat
and Crowded, Why we Need a
Green Revolution – and How
it Can Renew America, Farrar
Strauss and Giroux, NY, 2008.
3.
Growing Plastics, Chemical and
Engineering News, October,
2008.
4.
Advances in Polymers from
Renewable Resources, Dr. Jim
Lunt, Jim Lunt and Associates,
LLC, ANTEC 2008, New
Technology Forum.
5.
Reporting the Carbon and
Environmental Footprint of Bioplastics
Using Biocarbon Content
Calculations and LCA Tools.
Ramani Narayan, University
Distinguished Professor,
Chemical Engineering and
Materials Science, Issue May
2008.
6.
In the Arena, editorial by Joe
Klein, Time Magazine, November
24, 2008, p. 25.
7.
BioPlastics: The Value
Proposition by Ramani Narayan
and Jim Lunt.
Keywords

Sustainability, Reduced Carbon
Footprint, Alternative Energy,
Bio-based Polymers

10 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Figure 2.
Figure 3.
Figure 4.
Figure 2.
Figure 3.
Figure 4.
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 11

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12 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

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Thermoforming QUArTerLY 13

Thermoforming

Thermoforming 2.0

Quarterly®

Ultrasonic Sealing and Cutting
in Thermoforming

Sven Engelmann, Gerhard Schubert GmbH, Germany
Abstract
Introduction
Development
14 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Principle of Ultrasound
Results and Discussion
Conclusion
References
x(continued on next page)
Principle of Ultrasound
Results and Discussion
Conclusion
References
x(continued on next page)
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 15

Key Words
Figure 3. Sealing times.
Figure 4. Cutting forces.
Figure 5. Ultrasonic sealing and cutting station, automatic
Figure 1. Generator and oscillation unit.
Figure 2. Amplitude distribution of sonotrode.
Key Words
Figure 3. Sealing times.
Figure 4. Cutting forces.
Figure 5. Ultrasonic sealing and cutting station, automatic
Figure 1. Generator and oscillation unit.
Figure 2. Amplitude distribution of sonotrode.
unloading of punched trays.

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16 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

n
Access to industry
knowledge from one
central location: www.
thermoformingdivision.
com.
n
Subscription to
Thermoforming
Quarterly, voted
“Publication of the YearSPE National.
n
Exposure to new ideas
and trends from across
globe. If you don’t think
your company is affecteby globalization, you nto think again.
n
New and innovative
part design at the Parts
Competition.
n
Open dialogue with the
entire industry at the
annual conference.
n
Discounts, discounts,
discounts on books,
seminars and conferencn
For managers: workshoand presentations tailorspecifically to the needsyour operators.
n
For operators: workshoand presentations that
will send you home with
new tools to improve yoperformance, make your
job easier and help the
company’s bottom line.
Join
D25
toDay!
eepeput” by
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of
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ed
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Membership Benefits

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 17

Thermoforming
Quarterly®

Industry Practice

This PET’s a Big Blue-Box Problem

But moves are afoot to get thermoform PET containers into the recycling system

Ellen Moorhouse, freelance writer for the Toronto Star

Okay, so what’s the story about PET or PETE?

That’s the plastic in water and pop bottles with a
“1” in the recycling triangle on the bottom. Its name:
polyethylene terephthalate.

Many clear plastic berry boxes, lettuce bins and
egg cartons are made out of PET, too, although the
molecular structure is different. They are manufactured
by a thermoform process in which PET film is pressed
into shape, while bottles are made by blowing air into a
tube, forcing the hot plastic against the sides of a mould
cavity.

(Some clear containers are actually polystyrene – a
crystalline version of packing foam and meat trays – and
are labeled PS with a number 6, leading to even more
blue box challenges.)

Every time I mention that the clear plastic berry boxes,
salad bins and egg cartons aren’t recyclable, I receive
distressed emails from readers. Municipalities get the
same feedback.

“Virtually every day we get people calling, wanting
to know why we don’t collect it,” says Willma Bureau,
contracts and collection supervisor for Simcoe County.
“There’s a lot of pressure on us, but we made a conscious
decision not to collect materials that can’t be recycled in
North America.”

Toronto, Peel, Durham, Hamilton and Halton also
don’t want the thermoform containers.

Next year, things may change. Brampton-based Par-
Pak Ltd. is importing $2.5 million worth of equipment
from Europe that will pelletize and decontaminate both
bottle and thermoform PET for reuse in food-grade
containers. The company makes cookie trays, deli and
salad containers, bakery items and disposable take-out
containers.

Par-Pak’s vice-president of sales, Glen Armstrong,
says the equipment will be installed and operating early
next year. It will have the capacity to process close to 12
million kilos annually, which is a lot of clamshells.

“We’re going to be the first company in Canada to do
this, although there are companies taking the same path
in the U.S.,” says Armstrong.

Technical Editor’s Note: This article appeared in the Toronto Star
on October 3rd, 2009. Thanks to the author Ellen Moorhouse (a
freelance writer with a regular column under the title of “Trash Talk”)
for allowing us to print it here, unedited. It is common for us all
throughout North America to include thermoformed PET packaging
in our municipal recycling bins along with pop bottles, however until
optical sorters are installed to separate polymers reliably, clamshells
and trays are not accepted in the mainstream recycling facilities.
This article is somewhat misleading in that it says the problem lies
with the clamshell PET mixed with the bottle PET which creates
inconsistent quality for bottle blowmolders. This may be the case,
but the bigger problem is that other clear materials such as OPS
and PVC can get mixed with PET intended for thermoform sheet
extrusion which can cause considerable machine down time. As
she reports here, one southern Ontario thermoforming company is
investing big money to capitalize on the opportunity to recover the
packaging that might otherwise get into landfill. Other companies in
the United States are doing the same.

Sorting tests have been conducted at Toronto’s Dufferin
recycling plant and in the Region of Waterloo and the
thermoform bales have been shipped to the U.S. for
processing south of the border.

So what distinguishes bottle and thermoform PET?

“There’s a difference in the molecular weight,” says
Fred Edgecombe, a PhD and technical consultant to the
Canadian Plastics Industry Association. He’s worked in
plastics since the 1950s.

“The molecule is not so long in the thermoform material
as it is in the bottle resin. That makes it an easier material
to process in thermoforming.”

If the two kinds of PET get mixed, the material, with
its basic chain of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms,
must be processed to achieve the proper viscosity,
involving reactions and substances with impressive
names: esterification, polycondensation, ethylene glycol
and dimethyl terephthalate.

Decisions surrounding recycling depend on three things:
markets, the ability to sort it, and consumers’ willingness
to recycle it.

For thermoform PET, the problem is marketability and
sortability. It can be picked off using optical sorters that
identify PET but if you’re sorting manually, how do you
distinguish between PET and other clear containers as
they fly by on a conveyor?

18 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

“My customers won’t take anything
that isn’t bottle grade material,” says
John Baldry, who manages Toronto’s
recycling facilities.

Some thermoform does get
through, and he says he’ll lose his
customers if there is too much of it
in the bales.

He sympathized with a major egg
company that took the initiative to
have its clear plastic egg cartons
made out of more expensive bottlegrade
PET in a bid to make them
recyclable, but as Baldry says, “The
problem is there are (clear) egg
cartons out there that aren’t made
from PETE at all.”

Recycling is a young industry. For
sure, the plastics sector is struggling
to make products recyclable and
protect its flank against competing
products, such as bio-plastics,
that could add more challenges to
recycling.

According to Par-Pak, using postconsumer
PET reduces green house
gas emissions to a 10th of what’s
required to produce virgin resin from
fossil fuel, and the company wants to
procure its recycled PET (both bottle
and thermoform grades) from nearby
sources.

“Our ultimate goal is to have
our containers go into a blue box,
collected, sorted and ground and us
buy it and make more containers out
of it.

“That’s sustainable, and that is
truly closing the loop,” Armstrong
says.

“Trash Talk” usually appears
every Saturday in New in Homes &
Condos section of the Toronto Star.
Send questions and comments to
e_moorhouse@sympatico.ca. x

REDUCE! REUSE! RECYCLE!

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 19

UNIVERSITY NEwS UNIVERSITY NEwS
Pittsburg State Celebrates 40 Years of Plastics
with Student Trip to NPE

Seventeen students and 4 professors traveled via Amtrak to Chicago to
attend the largest plastics exposition in North America. Pittsburg State
University is renowned for its strong commitment to training students
in plastics processing. This year, several students reflected on their trip
to McCormick Place.

20 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

To me NPE was a very educational
experience that was informative and
full of all kinds of new processes. Being
able to see all of the machines running
in that building was amazing and one of
the most exciting experiences I have had
as a student. Overall, I made a few good
contacts while I was there so it was a very
helpful event.

~ Cody McCarley

The NPE trip was informative, educational,
and fun. It illustrated many different
processes and machine types with skilled
professionals from each company to
elaborate on any questions or items of
interest. It really allowed us all to see how
vast the plastic industry is.

~ James Ismert

NPE was an experience. It gave me the
opportunity to see what my industry has to
offer and the incredible machinery that is
out there. I went in there assuming I would
see things that I was familiar with, but
came out with a new perspective for the
plastics industry. The industry is so vast,
so it allows me to pick and choose the area
I want to pursue after graduation, rather
than being placed in an area.

~ David Martin

NPE was one of the top highlight
experiences of my college career. The
showcase is mind boggling with the
latest cutting edge technology on display.
The demonstrations and networking
opportunities at NPE have me excited to
begin my career in the plastics industry.

~ Michael Thurman

The NPE/ANTEC trip was very
inspirational. It gave all the students
a chance to witness new technologies
and meet new people. The trip was
an experience that will not be soon
forgotten.

~ Brad Tilman

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 21
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.Weatherable and easy to fabricate
. Excellent gloss control – from flat matte to
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Phone: 215.419.7982
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UPCOMING
CONFERENCES
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
SEPTEMBER 19 – 21, 2010
SCHAUMBURG, ILLINOIS
SEPTEMBER 17 – 20, 2011

FIRST CALL FOR SPONSORS/EXHIBITORS
19th Annual Thermoforming Conference & Exhibition
September 18 – 21, 2010
FIRST CALL FOR SPONSORS/EXHIBITORS
19th Annual Thermoforming Conference & Exhibition
September 18 – 21, 2010
MIDWEST AIRLINES CONVENTION CENTER
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
2010

®
T
T
“Embrace the Challenge”

he 19th Annual Thermoforming Conference and Exhibition – Thermoforming 2010:
“Embrace the Challenge” – plans are beginning to take shape. This show will be a forum for
the newest techniques, latest equipment, materials, auxiliary equipment and current industry
news. As an Exhibitor, this event will enable you to showcase your products and services at a show
geared just to THERMOFORMERS! If your company is a player in the THERMOFORMING
INDUSTRY, then this is the place for you to be in 2010. This industry event is a prime opportunity

for you to reach the decision makers in the field and create a brighter future for your business as well.

Full exhibits will be offered. Our machinery section continues to grow each year. If you are not yet participating
in our machinery section, you are encouraged to do so. Each 10′ x 10′ booth is fully piped, draped, carpeted
and a sign will be provided. As an extra value, one comp full registration is included with every booth sold.
This gives your attendees access to all Technical Sessions, Workshops, Special Events, Expert Panel
Discussions and all meals. A great bargain at $2,250.00.

We are also offering our sponsors and exhibitors a forum to present their newest innovations through
presentations at our newly introduced commercial sessions. Your SPONSORSHIP or participation as an
EXHIBITOR has demonstrated its potential to help your sales and it is contributing to the strength and
success of our industry as a whole.

We urge you to join us at THERMOFORMING 2010 in Milwaukee! Reserve your space early to avoid
disappointment. Booth assignments and commerciaal presentation opportunities are made on a first come,
first serve basis.

Should you have questions, please call (706) 235-9298, fax (706) 295-4276
or e-mail to gmathis224@aol.com.

22 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

2010 THERMOFORMING CONFERENCE
September 18 – 21, 2010
2010 THERMOFORMING CONFERENCE
September 18 – 21, 2010
SPONSOR & EXHIBITOR REGISTRATION FORM
(Please complete and return with your check today.)
_______
YES, we want to apply as a 2010 Thermoforming Conference SPONSOR. Enclosed
is our non-refundable deposit check for $2,500. We understand that if our firm is
selected through a “Sponsor Lottery” we will have 14 days after notification to submit
our payment of the additional $2,500 to confirm our Sponsor status. Those firms not
meeting this deadline will relinquish their sponsor position and will be reclassified
as an EXHIBITOR. Additional spaces available at discounted rates. 2nd Booth $2,250,
3rd Booth $2,000, 4 or more, $1,750 each.

WE WILL REQUIRE __________ Booths.
Initial Sponsor Cost … $5,000 – Signup Deadline: December 1, 2009.

_______
YES, we want to be a 2010 THERMOFORMING EXHIBITOR. Enclosed is our check
for $2,250. Additional 10′ x 10′ booths as needed will be 2nd $2,000, 3 or more $1,750
each. We will require _________ Booths. We understand that space assignments will
be assigned after SPONSORS have been selected. Cancellations will be accepted up
to June 1, 2010.

COMPANY NAME: ______________________________________________________________________________________________

CONTACT: _______________________________________________ SIGNATURE: _________________________________________

ADDRESS: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________

CITY/STATE/ZIP: _______________________________________________________________________________________________

PHONE: ____________________________________ FAX: ________________________________

E-MAIL:___________________________________________________________________________

You get one (1) FULL COMP REGISTRATION for each 10′ x 10′ booth space. Please list the person who will be using your
comp registration (subject to change):

MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO:

2010 SPE THERMOFORMING CONFERENCE

MAIL TO:

GWEN MATHIS, CONFERENCE COORDINATOR
SPE THERMOFORMING DIVISION

P. O. BOX 471, 6 SOUTH SECOND STREET, SE
LINDALE, GEORGIA 30147
FAX (706) 295-4276
Please inform us if
you wish to pay by
credit card and we
will arrange for the
transaction with SPE.
E-mail to
gmathis224@aol.com.

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 23

Need help
with your

technical school
or college
expenses?

I
I
f you or someone you
know is working towards a career
in the plastic industry, let the SPE
Thermoforming Division help support
those education goals.

Within this past year alone, our
organization has awarded multiple
scholarships! Get involved and take
advantage of available support from
your plastic industry!

Here is a partial list of schools
and colleges whose students have
benefited from the Thermoforming
Division Scholarship Program:

• UMASS Lowell
• San Jose State
• Pittsburg State
• Penn State Erie
• University of
Wisconsin
• Michigan State
• Ferris State
• Madison
Technical College
• Clemson University
• Illinois State
• Penn College
Start by completing the application
forms at www.thermoformingdivision.
com or at www.4spe.com. x

24 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

The Awards Committee is now accepting nominations for the 2010 THERMOFORMER OF THE
YEAR. Please help us by identifying worthy candidates. This prestigious honor will be awarded to
a member of our industry who has made a significant contribution to the thermoforming industry
in a technical, educational, or managerial aspect of thermoforming. Nominees will be evaluated
and voted on by the Thermoforming Board of Directors at the Winter 2010 meeting. The deadline
for submitting nominations is December 1st, 2009. Please complete the form below and include
all biographical information.
Person Nominated: ____________________________________ Title: ___________________
Firm or Institution______________________________________________________________
Street Address: ____________________________ City, State, Zip: ______________________
Telephone: _______________ Fax: _________________ E-mail: ________________________
Biographical Information:
• Nominee’s Experience in the Thermoforming Industry.
• Nominee’s Education (include degrees, year granted, name and location of university)
• Prior corporate or academic affiliations (include company and/or institutions, title, and
approximate dates of affiliations)
• Professional society affiliations
• Professional honors and awards.
• Publications and patents (please attach list).
• Evaluation of the effect of this individual’s achievement on technology and progress of
the plastics industry. (To support nomination, attach substantial documentation of these
achievements.)
• Other significant accomplishments in the field of plastics.
Individual Submitting Nomination: _______________________ Title: _____________________
Firm or Institution______________________________________________________________
Street Address: ____________________________ City, State, Zip: ______________________
Telephone: _______________ Fax: _________________ E-mail: ________________________
Signature: ___________________________________________ Date: ____________________
(ALL NOMINATIONS MUST BE SIGNED)
Please submit all nominations to:
Hal Gilham,
Productive Plastics
103 West Park Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08045
OR EMAIL halg@productiveplastics.com
Thermoformer of the Year 2010
The Awards Committee is now accepting nominations for the 2010 THERMOFORMER OF THE
YEAR. Please help us by identifying worthy candidates. This prestigious honor will be awarded to
a member of our industry who has made a significant contribution to the thermoforming industry
in a technical, educational, or managerial aspect of thermoforming. Nominees will be evaluated
and voted on by the Thermoforming Board of Directors at the Winter 2010 meeting. The deadline
for submitting nominations is December 1st, 2009. Please complete the form below and include
all biographical information.
Person Nominated: ____________________________________ Title: ___________________
Firm or Institution______________________________________________________________
Street Address: ____________________________ City, State, Zip: ______________________
Telephone: _______________ Fax: _________________ E-mail: ________________________
Biographical Information:
• Nominee’s Experience in the Thermoforming Industry.
• Nominee’s Education (include degrees, year granted, name and location of university)
• Prior corporate or academic affiliations (include company and/or institutions, title, and
approximate dates of affiliations)
• Professional society affiliations
• Professional honors and awards.
• Publications and patents (please attach list).
• Evaluation of the effect of this individual’s achievement on technology and progress of
the plastics industry. (To support nomination, attach substantial documentation of these
achievements.)
• Other significant accomplishments in the field of plastics.
Individual Submitting Nomination: _______________________ Title: _____________________
Firm or Institution______________________________________________________________
Street Address: ____________________________ City, State, Zip: ______________________
Telephone: _______________ Fax: _________________ E-mail: ________________________
Signature: ___________________________________________ Date: ____________________
(ALL NOMINATIONS MUST BE SIGNED)
Please submit all nominations to:
Hal Gilham,
Productive Plastics
103 West Park Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08045
OR EMAIL halg@productiveplastics.com
Thermoformer of the Year 2010
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 25

Visit Our
Website at:
www.thermoformingdivision.com
Our mission is
to facilitate the
advancement of
thermoforming
technologies
through
education,
application,
promotion and
research.
SPE National
Executive Director
Susan Oderwald
Direct Line: 203/740-5471
Fax: 203/775-8490
email: Seoderwald@4spe.org
Conference Coordinator
Gwen Mathis
6 S. Second Street, SE
Lindale, Georgia 30147
706/235-9298
Fax: 706/295-4276
email: gmathis224@aol.com
Visit Our
Website at:
www.thermoformingdivision.com
Our mission is
to facilitate the
advancement of
thermoforming
technologies
through
education,
application,
promotion and
research.
SPE National
Executive Director
Susan Oderwald
Direct Line: 203/740-5471
Fax: 203/775-8490
email: Seoderwald@4spe.org
Conference Coordinator
Gwen Mathis
6 S. Second Street, SE
Lindale, Georgia 30147
706/235-9298
Fax: 706/295-4276
email: gmathis224@aol.com
19th Annual Thermoforming Conference
September 18th – 21st, 2010
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Midwest Airlines
Convention Center
Milwaukee,
Wisconsin
Reservations Call 1-414-271-7250
Request the SPE Rate of $149.00
For More Information, Contact:
General Chair: Clarissa Schroeder
Invista S.a.r.l
864-579-5047
Clarissa.Schroeder@invista.com
Heavy Gauge Technical Chairman
Jay Waddell
Plastic Concepts & Innovations
843-971-7833
jwaddell@plasticoncepts@com
Roll Fed Technical Chairman
Mark Strahan
Global Thermoform Training, Inc.
754-224-7513
mark@global-tti.com
Parts Competition Chairman
Bret Joslyn
Joslyn Manufacturing
330-467-8111
bret@joslyn-mfg.com
Conference Coordinator
Gwen Mathis
SPE Thermoforming Division
706-235-9298
Fax 706-295-4276
gmathis224@aol.com
Check out our website at
www.thermoformingdivision.com
®
2010
“Embrace the Challenge”
HYTAC
®
Plug
Assist
Materials
info@cmtmaterials.com
www.cmtmaterials.com
TEL
(508)
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(508)
226-3902
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MATERIALS,INC.
Innovative
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26 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 27

Thermoforming

Thermoforming and Sustainability

Quarterly®

Resin Life Cycle Estimation to Help
Guide Sustainability Choices

Carol M. Casarino, Barry A. Morris, Susanne R. Veith (Editor’s Note: This paper was first presented at NPE 2009.
DuPont, wilmington, DE It is reprinted here with the kind permission of SPI.)

Abstract
Introduction
What Is An LCA?
28 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

DuPont’s Role in Supplying LCA Data to the
Industry
DuPont’s Approach
How To Use LCA Data
DuPont’s Role in Supplying LCA Data to the
Industry
DuPont’s Approach
How To Use LCA Data
(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 29

Conclusions
References
Conclusions
References
30 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Table II. Environmental Footprint of Resins (Source: PlasticsEurope [1] and Vink [2].)
Table III. Calculation of Clamshell Structures of Equal Bending Stiffness.
Figure 1. Life Cycle Schematic. Figure 1. Life Cycle Schematic.
Table I. Characteristics of Resins Used in Clamshell Example.

(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 31

Figure 3. Example of How Layer Position Influences Bending Stiffness (Morris and
Vansant, 1998).
Figure 4. Example of Model Computations for Downgauging a Processed Meat Web. Figure 4. Example of Model Computations for Downgauging a Processed Meat Web.
Figure 2. Schematic of DuPont’s Modular LCA Esimator Tool.

32 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

2010
EDITORIAL
CALENDAR

Quarterly Deadlines for

Copy and Sponsorships

ALL FINAL COPY FOR
EDITORIAL APPROVAL

30-JAN Spring 15-APR Summer

31-JUL Fall 30-OCT Winter

Post-Conference Edition

All artwork to be sent in .eps
or .jpg format with minimum
300dpi resolution.

Become a
Thermoforming
Quarterly Sponsor
in 2010!

Do you like the
new look?

Additional sponsorship
opportunities will include
4-color, full page, and
1/2 page.

RESERVE YOUR PRIME
SPONSORSHIP
SPACE TODAY.

Questions? Call or email
Laura Pichon
Ex-Tech Plastics
847-829-8124
Lpichon@extechplastics.com

BOOK SPACE
IN 2010!

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 33

Executive
Committee

2008 – 2010

CHAIR

Brian Ray
Ray Products
1700 Chablis Avenue
Ontario, CA 91761
(909) 390-9906, Ext. 216
Fax (909) 390-9984
brianr@rayplastics.com

CHAIR ELECT

Ken Griep
Portage Casting & Mold
2901 Portage Road
Portage, WI 53901
(608) 742-7137
Fax (608) 742-2199
ken@pcmwi.com

TREASURER

James Alongi
Maac Machinery
590 Tower Blvd.
Carol Stream, IL 60188
(630) 665-1700
Fax (630) 665-7799
jalongi@maacmachinery.com

SECRETARY

Mike Sirotnak
Solar Products
228 Wanaque Avenue
Pompton Lakes, NJ 07442
(973) 248-9370
Fax (973) 835-7856
msirotnak@solarproducts.com

COUNCILOR WITH TERM
ENDING ANTEC 2009

Roger Kipp
McClarin Plastics
P. O. Box 486, 15 Industrial Drive
Hanover, PA 17331
(717) 637-2241 x4003
Fax (717) 637-4811
rkipp@mcclarinplastics.com

PRIOR CHAIR

Walt Walker
Prent Corporation
P. O. Box 471, 2225 Kennedy Road
Janesville, WI 53547-0471
(608) 754-0276 x4410
Fax (608) 754-2410
wwalker@prent.com

2008 – 2010 THERMOFORMING DIVISION ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

Chair
Brian Ray
Chair Elect
Ken Griep
Finance
Bob Porsche
Technical Committees
Processing
walt Speck
Materials
Jim Armor
Machinery
Don Kruschke
Secretary
Mike Sirotnak
Nominating
Dennis Northrop
Publications /
Advertising
Laura Pichon
Newsletter Editor
Conor Carlin
Technical Editor
Barry Shepherd
OPCOM
Lola Carere
Treasurer
James Alongi
AARC
Rich Freeman
Student Programs
Ken Griep
Councilor
Roger Kipp
Prior Chair
walt walker
2008 Conference
Minneapolis
Dennis Northrop
Antec
Don Hylton
Membership
Haydn Forward
Marketing
Don Kruschke
Recognition
Hal Gilham
web Site
Rich Freeman
Green Committee
Steve Hasselbach
Conference Coordinator
Consultant
Gwen Mathis
2010 Conference
Milwaukee
Clarissa Schroeder
2011 Conference
Schaumburg
James Alongi
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34 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Board of Directors
MACHINERY
COMMITTEE
James Alongi
Maac Machinery
590 Tower Blvd.
Carol Stream, IL 60188
T: 630.665.1700
F: 630.665.7799
jalongi@maacmachinery.com
Roger Fox
The Foxmor Group
373 S. Country Farm Road
Suite 202
Wheaton, IL 60187
T: 630.653.2200
F: 630.653.1474
rfox@foxmor.com
Hal Gilham
Productive Plastics, Inc.
103 West Park Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08045
T: 856.778.4300
F: 856.234.3310
halg@productiveplastics.com
Bill Kent
Brown Machine
330 North Ross Street
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.7741
F: 989.435.2821
bill.kent@brown-machine.com
Don Kruschke (Chair)
Thermoforming Machinery
Equipment (TME)
31875 Solon Road
Solon, OH 44139
T: 440.498.4000
F: 440.498.4001
donk440@gmail.com
Brian Winton
Modern Machinery
PO Box 423
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.9071
F: 989.435.3940
bwinton@modernmachineinc.com
MATERIALS
COMMITTEE
Jim Armor (Chair)
Armor & Associates
16181 Santa Barbara Lane
Huntington Beach, CA 92649
T: 714.846.7000
F: 714.846.7001
jimarmor@aol.com
Phil Barhouse
Spartech Packaging
Technologies
100 Creative Way
PO Box 128
Ripon, WI 54971
T: 920.748.1119
F: 920.748.9466
phil.barhouse@spartech.com
Donald Hylton
McConnell Company
646 Holyfield Highway
Fairburn, GA 30213
T: 678.772.5008
don@thermoforming.com
Bill McConnell
McConnell Company
3030 Sandage Street
PO Box 11512
Fort Worth, TX 76110
T: 817.926.8287
F: 817.926.8298
billmc@thermoforming.com
Dennis Northrop
Soliant, LLC
1872 Highway 9 Bypass West
Lancaster, SC 29720
T: 803.287.5535
dnorthrop@paintfilm.com
Laura Pichon
Ex-Tech Plastics
PO Box 576
11413 Burlington Road
Richmond, IL 60071
T: 847.829.8124
F: 815.678.4248
lpichon@extechplastics.com
Clarissa Schroeder
Invista S.A.R.L
1550 Dewberry Road
Spartanburg, SC 29307
T: 864.579.5047
F: 864.579.5288
Clarissa.Schroeder@invista.com
Robert G. Porsche
General Plastics
2609 West Mill Road
Milwaukee, WI 53209
T: 414.351.1000
F: 414.351.1284
bob@genplas.com
Barry Shepherd
Shepherd Thermoforming
5 Abacus Way
Brampton, ONT L6T 5B7
T: 905.459.4545
F: 905.459.6746
bshep@shepherd.ca
Walt Speck (Chair)
Speck Plastics, Inc.
PO Box 421
Nazareth, PA 18064
T: 610.759.1807
F: 610.759.3916
wspeck@speckplastics.com
Jay Waddell
Plastics Concepts & Innovations
1127 Queensborough Road
Suite 102
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
T: 843.971.7833
F: 843.216.6151
jwaddell@plasticoncepts.com
PROCESSING
COMMITTEE
Art Buckel
McConnell Company
3452 Bayonne Drive
San Diego, CA 92109
T: 858.273.9620
F: 858.273.6837
artbuckel@thermoforming.com
Lola Carere
Thermopro
1600 Cross Point Way
Suite D
Duluth, GA 30097
T: 678.957.3220
F: 678.475.1747
lcarere@thermopro.com
Haydn Forward
Specialty Manufacturing Co.
6790 Nancy Ridge Road
San Diego, CA 92121
T: 858.450.1591
F: 858.450.0400
hforward@smi-mfg.com
Richard Freeman
Freetech Plastics
2211 Warm Springs Court
Fremont, CA 94539
T: 510.651.9996
F: 510.651.9917
rfree@freetechplastics.com
Ken Griep
Portage Casting & Mold
2901 Portage Road
Portage, WI 53901
T: 608.742.7137
F: 608.742.2199
ken@pcmwi.com
Steve Hasselbach
CMI Plastics
222 Pepsi Way
Ayden, NC 28416
T: 252.746.2171
F: 252.746.2172
steve@cmiplastics.com
Bret Joslyn
Joslyn Manufacturing
9400 Valley View Road
Macedonia, OH 44056
T: 330.467.8111
F: 330.467.6574
bret@joslyn-mfg.com
Stephen Murrill
Profile Plastics
65 S. Waukegan
Lake Bluff, IL 60044
T: 847.604.5100 x29
F: 847.604.8030
smurrill@thermoform.com
Board of Directors
MACHINERY
COMMITTEE
James Alongi
Maac Machinery
590 Tower Blvd.
Carol Stream, IL 60188
T: 630.665.1700
F: 630.665.7799
jalongi@maacmachinery.com
Roger Fox
The Foxmor Group
373 S. Country Farm Road
Suite 202
Wheaton, IL 60187
T: 630.653.2200
F: 630.653.1474
rfox@foxmor.com
Hal Gilham
Productive Plastics, Inc.
103 West Park Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08045
T: 856.778.4300
F: 856.234.3310
halg@productiveplastics.com
Bill Kent
Brown Machine
330 North Ross Street
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.7741
F: 989.435.2821
bill.kent@brown-machine.com
Don Kruschke (Chair)
Thermoforming Machinery
Equipment (TME)
31875 Solon Road
Solon, OH 44139
T: 440.498.4000
F: 440.498.4001
donk440@gmail.com
Brian Winton
Modern Machinery
PO Box 423
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.9071
F: 989.435.3940
bwinton@modernmachineinc.com
MATERIALS
COMMITTEE
Jim Armor (Chair)
Armor & Associates
16181 Santa Barbara Lane
Huntington Beach, CA 92649
T: 714.846.7000
F: 714.846.7001
jimarmor@aol.com
Phil Barhouse
Spartech Packaging
Technologies
100 Creative Way
PO Box 128
Ripon, WI 54971
T: 920.748.1119
F: 920.748.9466
phil.barhouse@spartech.com
Donald Hylton
McConnell Company
646 Holyfield Highway
Fairburn, GA 30213
T: 678.772.5008
don@thermoforming.com
Bill McConnell
McConnell Company
3030 Sandage Street
PO Box 11512
Fort Worth, TX 76110
T: 817.926.8287
F: 817.926.8298
billmc@thermoforming.com
Dennis Northrop
Soliant, LLC
1872 Highway 9 Bypass West
Lancaster, SC 29720
T: 803.287.5535
dnorthrop@paintfilm.com
Laura Pichon
Ex-Tech Plastics
PO Box 576
11413 Burlington Road
Richmond, IL 60071
T: 847.829.8124
F: 815.678.4248
lpichon@extechplastics.com
Clarissa Schroeder
Invista S.A.R.L
1550 Dewberry Road
Spartanburg, SC 29307
T: 864.579.5047
F: 864.579.5288
Clarissa.Schroeder@invista.com
Robert G. Porsche
General Plastics
2609 West Mill Road
Milwaukee, WI 53209
T: 414.351.1000
F: 414.351.1284
bob@genplas.com
Barry Shepherd
Shepherd Thermoforming
5 Abacus Way
Brampton, ONT L6T 5B7
T: 905.459.4545
F: 905.459.6746
bshep@shepherd.ca
Walt Speck (Chair)
Speck Plastics, Inc.
PO Box 421
Nazareth, PA 18064
T: 610.759.1807
F: 610.759.3916
wspeck@speckplastics.com
Jay Waddell
Plastics Concepts & Innovations
1127 Queensborough Road
Suite 102
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
T: 843.971.7833
F: 843.216.6151
jwaddell@plasticoncepts.com
PROCESSING
COMMITTEE
Art Buckel
McConnell Company
3452 Bayonne Drive
San Diego, CA 92109
T: 858.273.9620
F: 858.273.6837
artbuckel@thermoforming.com
Lola Carere
Thermopro
1600 Cross Point Way
Suite D
Duluth, GA 30097
T: 678.957.3220
F: 678.475.1747
lcarere@thermopro.com
Haydn Forward
Specialty Manufacturing Co.
6790 Nancy Ridge Road
San Diego, CA 92121
T: 858.450.1591
F: 858.450.0400
hforward@smi-mfg.com
Richard Freeman
Freetech Plastics
2211 Warm Springs Court
Fremont, CA 94539
T: 510.651.9996
F: 510.651.9917
rfree@freetechplastics.com
Ken Griep
Portage Casting & Mold
2901 Portage Road
Portage, WI 53901
T: 608.742.7137
F: 608.742.2199
ken@pcmwi.com
Steve Hasselbach
CMI Plastics
222 Pepsi Way
Ayden, NC 28416
T: 252.746.2171
F: 252.746.2172
steve@cmiplastics.com
Bret Joslyn
Joslyn Manufacturing
9400 Valley View Road
Macedonia, OH 44056
T: 330.467.8111
F: 330.467.6574
bret@joslyn-mfg.com
Stephen Murrill
Profile Plastics
65 S. Waukegan
Lake Bluff, IL 60044
T: 847.604.5100 x29
F: 847.604.8030
smurrill@thermoform.com
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 35

Thermoforming
Quarterly®
FOURTH QUARTER 2009
VOLUME 28 n NUMBER 4
Sponsor Index These sponsors enable us to publish Thermoforming Quarterly
Thermoforming
Quarterly®
FOURTH QUARTER 2009
VOLUME 28 n NUMBER 4
Sponsor Index These sponsors enable us to publish Thermoforming Quarterly
n Allen ……………………………21
n Advanced Ventures in

Technology ………………..12
n A. Schulman ……………….. IBC
n Arkema / Altuglas……………21
n Brown Machine……………….27
n CMT Materials ………………..26
n Edward D. Segen …………….21
n Frimo …………………………..27
n Future Mold …………………..12
n GN Plastics ……………………12
n Kiefel …………………………….5
n KMT …………………………….36
n Kydex ……………….Back Cover
n Maac Machinery………………33
n McClarin Plastics……………..12
n Modern Machinery …………..12
n Monark …………………………27
n Onsrud Cutter ………………..20
n PCI ……………………………….5
n PMC …………………….IFC & 33
n Portage Casting & Mold……..19
n Primex Plastics …………………5
n Profile Plastics Corp. ………..21
n Protherm ………………………17
n PTi ………………………………17
n Ray Products ………………….21
n Solar Products………………..13
n Tempco ………………………..36
n Thermwood……………………19
n Tooling Technology …………..24
n TPS …………………………….24
n Ultra-Metric Tool……………..34
n WECO ………………………….17
n Wisconsin Engraving ………..19
n Xaloy, Inc. …………………….24
n Zed Industries………………..21

36 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

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