Quarterly Mags: 2010 2nd

Quarterly®
Thermoforming
A JOURNAL OF THE THERMOFORMING DIVISION OF THE SOCIETY OF PLASTIC ENGINEERS SECOND QUARTER 2010 n VOLUME 29 n NUMBER 2
PLASTICS IN A
METAL WORLD … page 6
®
Quarterly®
Thermoforming
A JOURNAL OF THE THERMOFORMING DIVISION OF THE SOCIETY OF PLASTIC ENGINEERS SECOND QUARTER 2010 n VOLUME 29 n NUMBER 2
PLASTICS IN A
METAL WORLD … page 6
®
Thermoforming 2.0: Reinforced Thermoplastic Basics page 8
ANTEC Paper: Investigation into the Effect of Extrusion and Thermoforming

INSIDE …

Parameters on the Properties of Polypropylene Containers page 14
19th Annual Conference Preview page 26

WWW.THERMOFORMINGDIVISION.COM

Thermoforming
Quarterly®
SECOND QUARTER 2010
VOLUME 29 n NUMBER 2
Contents Contents
Thermoforming
Quarterly®
n
Departments
Chairman’s Corner x 2
Thermoforming in the News x 4
University News x
22

PLASTICS IN AMETAL WORLD
Cover Story

n
Features
Industry Practice x
6

Plastics in a Metal World

Thermoforming 2.0 x
8

Reinforced Thermoplastics Basics

ANTEC Paper x
14

Investigation into the Effect of Extrusion and Thermoforming
Parameters on the Properties of Polypropylene Containers

Thermoforming and
Sustainability x
30

n
In This Issue
2010 Thermoformer of the Year x
21

Roger Kipp, McClarin, Inc.

19th Annual Conference x
26-29

Chairman Ken Griep
Page 2

A JOURNAL PUBLISHED EACH
CALENDAR QUARTER BY THE
THERMOFORMING DIVISION
OF THE SOCIETY OF
PLASTICS ENGINEERS

Editor

Conor Carlin

(617) 771-3321
cpcarlin@gmail.com
Sponsorships

Laura Pichon

(847) 829-8124
Fax (815) 678-4248
lpichon@extechplastics.com
Conference Coordinator

Gwen Mathis

(706) 235-9298
Fax (706) 295-4276
gmathis224@aol.com
Thermoforming Quarterly® is published
four times annually as an informational
and educational bulletin to
the members of the Society of Plastics
Engineers, Thermoforming Division,
and the thermoforming industry. The
name, “Thermoforming Quarterly®”
and its logotype, are registered trademarks
of the Thermoforming Division
of the Society of Plastics Engineers, Inc.
No part of this publication may be reproduced
in any form or by any means
without prior written permission of the
publisher, copyright holder. Opinions
of the authors are their own, and the
publishers cannot be held responsible
for opinions or representations of any
unsolicited material. Printed in the

U.S.A.
Thermoforming Quarterly® is registered
in the U.S. Patent and Trademark
Office (Registration no. 2,229,747).

Roger Kipp
Page 25

Cover photo is courtesy of
The Torque Report
All Rights Reserved 2010
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 1

Thermoforming
Quarterly® Chairman’s Corner
Ken Griep Ken Griep
Spring is here! First and
foremost, I would like to thank
Brian Ray and the Thermoforming
Board of Directors for electing me
Chairman for the next two years. It is
both an honor and a challenge to lead
the division during current difficult
economic times.

Our annual conference in
Milwaukee, WI (September 18th

– 21st) is shaping up to be a huge
success. The technical program is
receiving great responses for content
and the exhibitor hall sponsors
are lining up and signing up to
participate.
In the current economy, we are all
struggling with work shortages,
reduced hours and a lack of projects.
This is a change for our industry and
one to which we are not accustomed.
Now is not the time to dig ourselves
into a deep hole and wait for a better
day to arrive at the door step. I want
to create a challenge to our sponsors,
exhibitors, attendees and all of
our partners in the thermoforming
industry: today is the day we need to

get creative and push into high gear.
My challenge is for our industry
to create a new level of customer
confidence and involvement. We
need new materials and process
techniques to accelerate our
current technologies. We need new,
innovative developments to take us
beyond the current realm of thinking
and processing.

The thermoforming industry is
here to stay. Our challenge is to
show our customers that we are a
dynamic industry. We must show
renewed interest in their needs and
desires. We need to be their solution
partners! Educating our clients
to the fact that thermoforming is
stronger, lighter and more functional
than other plastic processes cannot
be delayed. Price is not the only
criteria. Developments in new
materials are required to compete
with other plastic processing while
value-added services will provide
new competitive advantages. We
need to show our customers that
thermoforming can and will exceed
their needs.

To achieve this goal, we will all need
to work together to create a vibrant
industry. Competition creates new
products. The current practice of
buying business to keep your staff
busy is hurting our growth and is
discouraging new development.
This practice most often shows the
client an inferior process. They will
not know or understand all that we
can offer if we chase business to the
bottom.

Our industry is about more than
plastic forming. We are innovative
and creative. We can and should
find new areas in which to develop
products. One such need is in
disaster relief. We have had recent
devastating earthquakes in Haiti
and in Chile as well as continual
eruptions of volcanoes in Iceland. A
product line that should be created
by our industry is an emergency
relief shelter. These should be
thermoformed and be deployable at
a reasonable cost that provides aid to
those in need.

Markets and clients need to see
that thermoforming is a thriving
industry that fully understands
the cost of manufacturing. It is an
industry that is driving to provide
the best solutions possible while
continually improving for new and
unmet needs. We must continue to
push our industry forward. We need
to collectively alter our course of
business practices by increasing the
benefits of thermoforming to the end
user. It is time to step up and show
the world that thermoforming is here
for the long haul!

Thank you for your continued
support and I look forward to
meeting you in Milwaukee.

If you have any comments or
questions, please feel free to contact
me. I would like to hear from you!

2 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

ken@pcmwi.com

Why Join?
®
Why Not?
It has never been more important to be a member
of your professional society than now, in the current
climate of change and volatility in the plastics
industry. Now, more than ever, the information you
access and the personal networks you create can and
will directly impact your future and your career.
Active membership in SPE – keeps you current, keeps
you informed, and keeps you connected.
The question really isn’t “why join?” but …
Thermoforming
Quarterly® New Members
Francesco Fiorentini
Forma Srl
Nerviano, Italy
Klaus Wanner
Hekuma GmbH
Eching, Germany
Arild S. Johnsen
Plexx AS
Fredrikstad, Norway
David Russell
David Russell Associates Ltd.
Uphall, Broxburn, United Kingdom
Dwight Mauk
Dart Container Corp.
Webberville, MI
Mike Schubert
Plastic Ingenuity
Cross Plains, WI
David J. O’Leary
Kenson Plastics
Warrendale, PA
Terrence Coyne
Pactiv
Lake Forest, IL
Mitch Leuthard
General Mills
Murfreesboro, TN
Greg Perkolup
Tek Pak, Inc.
Batavia, IL
Randy S. Baudry
ITW Deltar IPAC
Frankfort, IL
Tillman (Tim) C. Strahan
Packaging Plus
La Mirada, CA
Jim Fitzell
Corvac Composites, LLC
Byron Center, MI
Deepti S. Marathe
Maharashtra Institute of
Technology
Pune, India
Ken Mitchell
GenPak LLC
Longview, TX
Lane M. Wescott
Mity-Lite
Orem, UT
Rick Wolfe
Bemis
Hickory, NC
Kent French
Illig KP
South Hill, VA
Andrew R. Marinelli
Universal Protection Packaging
Inc.
Mechanicsburg, PA
David J. Fronczak
Elgin, IL
David L. Hawkins
Batavia, IL
Philip Driskill
Chesterton, IN
Ken Harris
Baxter
Mountain Home, AR
Rohan Noel Pukadyil
Hamilton, ON, Canada
Paul Lunn
PepsiCo
Valhalla, NY
Michael Mahan
Spartech Corp.
Clayton, MO
Mark Fessler
Sabert Corporaton
Sayreville, NJ
Shirish Chirputkar
Phailen Industries
Pune, India
Charles B. Greenwood
Greenwood Technical Services
Swingfield, Dover, United
Kingdom
Edmund W. Holfeld
Holfeld Plastics Ltd.
Co. Wicklow, Ireland
Joseph Larade
GN Plastics Company Limited
Chester, NS, Canada
Jason E. Coker
Plastic Package
Sacramento, CA
Tom Sawadski
Quakertown, PA
Julio C. Muzquiz
Formosa Plastics Corporation
Point Comfort, TX
Anthony Nugent
Dimensional Merchandising Inc.
Wharton, NJ
Michael A. Robinette
Techniform Industries Inc.
Fremont, OH
Why Join?
®
Why Not?
It has never been more important to be a member
of your professional society than now, in the current
climate of change and volatility in the plastics
industry. Now, more than ever, the information you
access and the personal networks you create can and
will directly impact your future and your career.
Active membership in SPE – keeps you current, keeps
you informed, and keeps you connected.
The question really isn’t “why join?” but …
Thermoforming
Quarterly® New Members
Francesco Fiorentini
Forma Srl
Nerviano, Italy
Klaus Wanner
Hekuma GmbH
Eching, Germany
Arild S. Johnsen
Plexx AS
Fredrikstad, Norway
David Russell
David Russell Associates Ltd.
Uphall, Broxburn, United Kingdom
Dwight Mauk
Dart Container Corp.
Webberville, MI
Mike Schubert
Plastic Ingenuity
Cross Plains, WI
David J. O’Leary
Kenson Plastics
Warrendale, PA
Terrence Coyne
Pactiv
Lake Forest, IL
Mitch Leuthard
General Mills
Murfreesboro, TN
Greg Perkolup
Tek Pak, Inc.
Batavia, IL
Randy S. Baudry
ITW Deltar IPAC
Frankfort, IL
Tillman (Tim) C. Strahan
Packaging Plus
La Mirada, CA
Jim Fitzell
Corvac Composites, LLC
Byron Center, MI
Deepti S. Marathe
Maharashtra Institute of
Technology
Pune, India
Ken Mitchell
GenPak LLC
Longview, TX
Lane M. Wescott
Mity-Lite
Orem, UT
Rick Wolfe
Bemis
Hickory, NC
Kent French
Illig KP
South Hill, VA
Andrew R. Marinelli
Universal Protection Packaging
Inc.
Mechanicsburg, PA
David J. Fronczak
Elgin, IL
David L. Hawkins
Batavia, IL
Philip Driskill
Chesterton, IN
Ken Harris
Baxter
Mountain Home, AR
Rohan Noel Pukadyil
Hamilton, ON, Canada
Paul Lunn
PepsiCo
Valhalla, NY
Michael Mahan
Spartech Corp.
Clayton, MO
Mark Fessler
Sabert Corporaton
Sayreville, NJ
Shirish Chirputkar
Phailen Industries
Pune, India
Charles B. Greenwood
Greenwood Technical Services
Swingfield, Dover, United
Kingdom
Edmund W. Holfeld
Holfeld Plastics Ltd.
Co. Wicklow, Ireland
Joseph Larade
GN Plastics Company Limited
Chester, NS, Canada
Jason E. Coker
Plastic Package
Sacramento, CA
Tom Sawadski
Quakertown, PA
Julio C. Muzquiz
Formosa Plastics Corporation
Point Comfort, TX
Anthony Nugent
Dimensional Merchandising Inc.
Wharton, NJ
Michael A. Robinette
Techniform Industries Inc.
Fremont, OH
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 3

Thermoforming in the news
Plastics
Packaging: Pactiv
takes over PWP

By Matt Defosse
Published: February 25th, 2010

Consumer and foodservice
packaging major Pactiv has
acquired thermoformer PWP
Industries from holding company
HPC Industries for $200 million.
HPC is the holding company
run by Leon Farahnik, who just
two years ago sold his stake in
the world’s largest shopping bag
processor, Hilex Poly, another
company he founded.

For Pactiv (Lake Forest, IL), the
acquisition especially strengthens
its position in the baked goods
and foodservice markets. PWP’s
2009 sales were about $149
million. The company has three
processing facilities: one in Texas,
West Virginia and its headquarters
site in Vernon, CA. It employs
approximately 600, and extrudes
much of the film it processes.

PWP has scored well many
times at SPE thermoforming
competitions, indicative of
the company’s design and
thermoforming skills. Also
attractive about PWP are its
polyethylene terephthalate (PET)
recycling facilities in West
Virginia and one to be built in
California, as these can provide
lower-cost feedstock to PWP
for its extrusion and subsequent
thermoforming. The West Virginia
PET recycling site is located
only three miles from a PWP
processing facility in that state.

According to Pactiv, the
acquisition is expected to be
modestly accretive to earnings per

share and free cash flow in 2010
and generate a return in excess of
Pactiv’s cost of capital within two
to three years. The transaction is
expected to close in the first quarter.

Pactiv runs 46 production facilities
and employs some 12,000, with
annual sales of $3.4 billion. Its
Hefty-brand bags and disposable
plates accounted for 38% of its 2009
sales, with sales into food service
and food packaging branches
accounting for the remainder of
sales. The processor is now the sole
supplier of store-brand trash bags to
Wal-Mart.

In a presentation on February 24
at the Credit Suisse annual global
paper and packaging conference,
a day after Pactiv announced the
purchase, Pactiv officials claimed
compound annual growth rates of
6.6% in the last five years for the
Hefty products and 5.2% CAGR
for its other product lines in the
same period, with profit CAGR
even higher. In 2009 Pactiv saw
its volume of sales grow by 3.2%
and its earnings per share hit $2.31,
the highest ever for the NYSElisted
company. (Reprinted with
permission from Plastics Today.) x

Twin-sheet
thermoformed TPU
deployed to Iraq
and Afghanistan

By Tony Deligio
Published: March 18th, 2010

A technology initially developed
to absorb impact in running shoes
now protects soldiers, seeing
use in everything from helmets
and kneepads to blast-limiting
sheets and seat cushions, with

development of ballistic grades for
vests currently under way.

How much protection? During
an interview with Mike Buchen,
president and CEO of Skydex, at
its Centennial, CO headquarters,
he covered one hand with the
company’s new thermoplastic
polyurethane (TPU) sheet padding
and used the other to repeatedly slam
a ballistic helmet into the material.
This reporter was convinced.

The key to its innovation is what
Skydex calls twin hemispheres.
Supplied in sheet form, the product
is made by forming small cups, or
hemispheres, in a TPU sheet, and
then joining two still-warm sheets
of the structures in a twin-sheet
thermoforming process, so that the
cups are bonded together, bottom to
bottom, to form an hourglass shape.

By changing the hemisphere’s
composition, thickness, and
spacing, Skydex can tune them to
a specific function, with current
applications covering blast limiting,
cushioning, impact mitigation,
vibration absorption, and sound
dampening. The product also uses
various additive packages to boost
functionality and performance in
the field, including the addition of
flame-retardant, anti-mildew, antifungus,
and anti-static systems.

At the company’s headquarters,
Buchen and Peter Foley, chief
technology officer, walked through
the numerous applications the
unique geometry has found a niche
in, pulling product samples off
the wall of their conference room,
and occasionally demonstrating
their effectiveness. With the ability
to target foam currently used for
cushioning and protection, the
potential volume of applications for
the technology seems limitless, but

4 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Foley said Skydex has maintained
strict focus in the products it targets.

“We’re not packaging foam,” Foley
explains. “We have to protect things
that matter, because if it’s something
that can be broken and replaced,
you’re probably going to protect it
with polystyrene or something like
that. For now, there are so many
different ways we can tune this to
protect brains and limbs, that that’s
really the focus.”

Part of that immediate winnowing
of development is blast-limiting
panels that will be included in more
than 6,000 military vehicles headed
to Iraq and Afghanistan. Force
Protection’s Cougar and Buffalo
vehicles, as well as Oshkosh’s
M-ATV, will feature large sheets, up
to 60 by 90 inches, to help mitigate
the impact caused by improvised
explosive devices (IEDs).

Using independent studies, Skydex
determined that its protective
material reduces blast force
transmitted through the floor by
71%. Those results were for vehicles
headed to Afghanistan, where
roadside bombs cause 75% of the
casualties to coalition forces, and
more than 50% of the troops will be
exposed to a blast wave in one form
or a another.

“We really started focusing on the
military in 2004,” Foley says, “and
re-engineered the technology from
dealing with the impact of a foot
hitting the ground, which is a very
known thing, to protecting brains
from bullets, protecting brains from
overpressure, shockwaves, IEDs.”

Building better helmet padding.
Before it was placed on the floors
and walls of the next generation
of vehicles to be deployed in Iraq
and Afghanistan, Skydex’s first
tour came in ballistic helmets,
replacing leather headbands. The
older-generation PASGT system,
which used leather or Kevlar to
hold a helmet on, had proven

uncomfortable, and the nextgeneration
foam pads failed to
perform under all the conditions
soldiers can face. Buchen recalls a
sales call in which, after storing the
foam pads in a small cooler so they
came down to 35-40°F, he broke
them in half at a National Guard
base. Because of this lack of lowtemperature
performance, troops
were instructed to remove the pads
from their helmet at night in cold
environs and store them in a warm
place.

After adopting Skydex’s twin
hemispheres, the Army has more
than doubled the impact standards
for its helmet pads because of
their properties, taking them from
absorbing 10 ft/sec of impact
velocity to now striving for 17 ft/sec.

A duty to their customers.

The choice to protect soldiers in the
field as opposed to flat-screen TVs
during shipping has had numerous
impacts on Skydex, including how
it deals with certain customers. “We
are committed to protecting things
that matter and in this business, I
don’t know of anything that matters
more than the safety of our men and
women in uniform,” says Buchen.

(Reprinted with permission from
Plastics Today.) x

Leading UK
Thermoformer
Acquired by France
Multinational

By Rory Harrington, FoodProductionDaily.com

The takeover of UK plastics
packaging company Sharp
Interpack by French multinational
firm Groupe Guillin was
announced on April 15.

The deal to acquire 100 percent of
Sharp Interpack’s shares and assets
was signed on April 9 and means
Groupe Guillin will now carry out
more than 60 percent of its business

outside France. No financial details
were disclosed.

Sharp Interpack is a UK
manufacturer and distributor
of thermoformed rigid plastic
packaging for the fruit and vegetable
packers, meat and fish processors as
well as retail and bespoke packaging.
The company, which is forecast to
post a turnover of £86m in 2009/10,
has three facilities in southern
England in Ayelsham, Bridgwater
and Yate.

“The combination of Groupe
Guillin’s expertise alongside Sharp
Interpack’s UK market experience
allows Guillin to strengthen its
leading position on the European
market for fruit and vegetables, and
expand its strategic position in the
industry and develop new industrial
and commercial relationships
for meat products,” said a joint
statement from the firms.

European reach

Andrew Copson, deputy managing
director for Sharp Interpack, told
FoodProductionDaily.com: “The
takeover will now give our company
European reach and means we will
be able to offer customers in excess
of 3,000 packaging products.”

He added that discussions with
Groupe Guillin had given every
indication it was committed to
growing the UK business through

“sustained investment.”

“This is great news both for our
company and our customers,” said
Copson.

The French firm, which also has
operations in Spain, Italy and
Poland, said negotiations had been
ongoing since 21 December, 2009.

Groupe Guillin already owns three
other UK packaging companies
Premier Packaging, GPI and
Socamel. The firm was founded in
1972 and since then has pursued
a strategy of growth through
acquisitions.

x

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 5

Thermoforming
Quarterly®

Industry Practice

Plastics in a Metal World

Don Mebius, Value Engineering Manager, McClarin Plastics, Inc.

W
W
ith the technological advances seen over the past
few years in the realm of plastic and composite
materials, traditional metal products are being replaced
in innovative applications. Many plastic base chemistries
exist now that were not even contemplated a short while
ago and have been developed for specific applications,
from protecting the Space Shuttle during re-entry to
designing the hand-held gadgets that we all take for
granted today.

One particular field where these materials have been
widely applied is in the trucking world. Where once
metal was the material of choice, plastics are now
becoming more prevalent. With careful material selection
and component designations, many advantages can be
conferred on the manufacturers:

•
The elimination of corrosion – plastics can’t rust.
This maintains the “like new” appearance of a vehicle
for much longer and contributes to a positive opinion
of the product over an extended period of time.

•
Weight reduction which translates to fuel economy.
With the fuel cost fluctuations seen over the past year,
fuel expense becomes a greater issue than ever before.

•
Aerodynamics as a large factor in truck design
for added fuel economy. Another advantage to this
potential is that the manufacturer is free to emphasize
their brand characteristics. Greater design flexibility
is now possible to create an individual and distinctive
appearance.
•
Color that is a part of the component, not applied
later. This advantage becomes obvious over
time where normally a small scratch can become
an embarrassing eyesore. Corrosion can give the
appearance of a much larger flaw because the scratch
has induced the appearance of a major defect. With the
plastic material, the operator has a rig that continues
to look good, year after year, and doesn’t depend on
the coating to double as a protective barrier to the base
metal.
•
Better impact resistance and reduced maintenance.
The front bumper fascias of many newer rigs are much
more aerodynamic, with smoother shapes, as can be seen
in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Automotive front bumper fascia.

An end result of using plastics is part reduction – this can
be dramatic in many cases, because part integration plays
a vital role if the design is done using one of the basic
advantages of the material from the outset. To simply
replace a steel component with an identical plastic part is
not cost-effective. It is important to use the full advantages
of the material and process. You can also see from the photo
that the running lights have been incorporated due to the
processing advantages of thermoforming. This part can
also absorb much greater impacts than its steel counterpart.
Other examples include side cladding and air foils. These
many shapes are not economically produced in metal.

Figure 2. Examples of plastic components on
truck.
Other components include side panels in heavy-duty tow
rigs. (See Figure 3.)

TPO (Thermoplastic Olefin) is a highly beneficial material.
This material is finding widespread use in many automotive
applications, such as bumper cladding, front fender
protection and air deflectors. The Chevrolet HHR retro car
(see Figure 4) utilizes this material on the rear fender to
protect the leading edge from gravel coming from the front
tires.

6 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Figure 3. Examples of plastic components on truck.

An inherent advantage of this material is that it is flexible,
can take heavy impact loads, and is forgiving in that it
does not show this abuse. It can also handle the type of
temperature extremes most vehicles are subject to.

Figure 4. Chevrolet HHR with rear fender made from TPO.

TPO is a blend of polypropylene with various fillers,
including various grades of rubber. The advantage this
blend yields is a formable thermoplastic sheet that can take
impacts and be very flexible. These properties are highly
advantageous in the automotive and truck environment.
Additionally, it is resistant to the sun’s rays, and does not
suffer from UV degradation. Typical physical properties are
noted below:

As can be seen in Table 1, the high flexural properties and
impact strength make this material ideal for many of these
automotive and truck applications Another example of the
use of this material is in a wind fairing for a medium-duty
cargo truck. A customer was introducing a new product
line and wanted to include a wind fairing on the front of
the cargo box above the cab. Additionally, the customer
required a high-gloss finish to match the finish of the truck
cab. A custom design was provided to include a shaped
detail for the marker lights, and an added profile to match
the truck cabs being used. The photo below is an excellent
example of the application:

Figure 3. Examples of wind fairing component.

Being involved from the beginning of a project adds
significant value to the final product that makes it more
durable and appealing. Additionally, the customer’s
warranty requirements can more easily be met. These are a
few examples of plastics / composites use in this rigorous
environment. Perhaps these ideas can generate other ideas
to replace a metal component with plastic.

x

REDUCE!
REUSE!
RECYCLE!

REDUCE!
REUSE!
RECYCLE!

Table 1. Physical properties of TPO.

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 7

Thermoforming
Quarterly®

Reinforced Thermoplastics Basics

Domasius Nwabunma, Ph.D., Senior Development Engineer, Spartech Corporation, Warsaw, IN 46580 and
Randall T. Myers, Ph.D., Commercial Development Manager, Spartech Corporation, Clayton, MO 63105

Introduction

Reinforced thermoplastics or
reinforced plastics are a subclass
of reinforced polymer composites,
the two other classes being
reinforced thermosets and self
reinforced polymers. Since the
reinforcing material is normally
a fiber, reinforced thermoplastics
can be regarded as fiber
reinforced thermoplastics. Figure
1 shows the classification of
reinforced polymers based on this
convention. A second classification
of reinforced polymers is based
on the type of fibers: glass fiber
reinforced polymers, carbon fiber
reinforced polymers, aramid
fiber reinforced polymers, and
natural fiber reinforced polymers.
A third classification is based
on the specific resin or polymer
used in the composite: reinforced
polypropylene, reinforced
polycarbonate, reinforced
thermoplastic polyester, reinforced
unsaturated polyester, reinforced
nylon, reinforced epoxy,
reinforced styrenics, reinforced
PVC, reinforced phenolics,
reinforced ABS, etc.

Figure 2 shows methods used to
formulate reinforced polymers as
well as fabricate parts from them.
If a reinforced polymer is designed
and fabricated correctly, it leads
to material with a combination of
desirable properties not available
in any single conventional
material. Reinforced polymer
composite processing technologies

Thermoforming 2.0

are often capital and/or labor
intensive. For example, sheet
molding compound (SMC) tools are
more expensive than corresponding

thermoforming tools, fiberglass

“chopper gun” is very labor
intensive, autoclaving is a time and

Figure 1. A Classification of Reinforced Polymer Composites.

Figure 2. Formulation and Manufacturing Methods for Reinforced Polymer
Composites.

Thermoplastic Matrix

One of the main components of
reinforced thermoplastic composites
is the thermoplastic polymer.
The function of the thermoplastic

energy intensive process. Composite
companies may be vertically
integrated throughout the composite
value chain. For example, a
company who manufactures SMC
parts may also be involved in the
formulating of the same material.

polymer, which is also called the
matrix, is to bind the reinforcing

filler, provide compressive strength,

and chemical resistance of the
composite. Thermoplastics are
either amorphous or semi crystalline

8 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

and in terms of performance

can be classified as commodity

polymers, engineering polymers,
and high/ultra high performance
polymers as shown in Table 1.
The commodity and engineering
thermoplastic matrices offer
lower processing temperatures
and cost but have limited use
temperatures. The high and ultra
high performance thermoplastics
tend to be designed for higher
temperature environments and when

reinforced with fibers, they exhibit

long shelf life without refrigeration
and possess exceptional impact
resistance and vibration-damping
properties. Their drawback is that
they tend to be more expensive
and can present composites
manufacturers with some processing
challenges because of their high
viscosities. This is especially true
with amorphous materials as they
lack the sharp transition desirable

for good fiber wet-out.

Reinforcing Fibers

The reinforcing fibers are another
important constituent in reinforced
thermoplastic composites. They
can be long or short in length in the
form of single strands or twisted,
woven, stitched, knitted, or braided
strands. Reinforced fibers can
occupy up to 70% of matrix volume
in the composites. The function of
the reinforcing fibers is to increase
stiffness, tensile strength, fatigue/

creep resistance, and heat deflection

temperature and shrinkage
reduction. The mechanical
properties of the composites are
thus dominated by the reinforcing

fibers. The mechanical properties
depend on many fiber properties
such as fiber types, loading level,

orientation, and architecture. The

fiber architecture denotes the predesign
fiber configuration such

as mats, tape, roving, and fabrics
obtained through braiding, knitting,

or weaving. The reinforcing fibers

may be treated with sizes such
as starch, gelatin, oil, wax, and
binders to improve bonding, and
handling. Table 2 shows different

kinds of fibers used to reinforce
thermoplastics. Of these fibers, the

most commonly used reinforced
thermoplastics for structural

applications are glass fibers,
aramid fibers, and carbon fibers.
Glass fibers are less expensive and

carbon fibers are generally more

expensive. The cost of aramid

fibers is typically between the cost
of glass fibers and carbon fibers.

Fillers and Other
Additives

Fillers are added to reinforced
thermoplastics to either reduce
cost or to produce a composite
with superior properties. Fillers
commonly used in the formulation
of reinforced thermoplastics
include calcium carbonate,
clay minerals (mica, kaolin,
talc, vermiculite, smectite
(bentonite, hectorite), silica,
talc, wollastonite, carbon black,

glass bubbles. When one or
more of these fillers are added

to reinforced thermoplastic
composites, the improvement

in performance may include fire

and chemical resistance, low
shrinkage and thermal expansion,

Table 2. Fibers Used in Reinforcing Thermoplastics.

Glass Fibers

Carbon Fibers:

Fibers from PAN and Mesophase Pitch
Graphite Fibers
Carbon Nanotubes (Single and Multi-wall)
Ceramic Fibers
Boron Fibers

Natural Fibers:
Bast (Skin Fibers): Flax Jute, Hemp, Bamboo, Wood
Fruit/Seed Fibers: Cotton, Coir (Coconut), Kapok
Leaf Fibers: Sisal, Henequen, Pineapple, Banana

Polymeric Fibers: Rayon, Aramid Fibers (Kevlar, Nomex)

Table 1. Amorphous and Semi Crystalline Thermoplastic Matrices by Performance.

(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 9

fatigue resistance, and mechanical
strength. There are other additives
that are added to reinforced
thermoplastics to improve
processability, aesthetics, surface
properties, etc. These additives can
be catalyst, promoters, inhibitors,
colorant, and release agents.

Markets for Reinforced
Thermoplastics

Reinforced thermoplastics are

increasingly finding applications in

many areas owing to their superior
performance characteristics
over their metal and ceramic
counterparts. This characteristics
include weight reduction, corrosion
resistance, paint elimination
(color can be added in situ), cost
reduction, impact resistance,
and softness. As shown in
Figure 3, end-use markets for
reinforced thermoplastics include
transportation, construction, marine,
electrical & electronics, consumer
products, aircraft/defense. North
America and Europe are the
largest markets for reinforced
thermoplastics closely followed by

Asia-Pacific. The U.S. represents

the second largest market for
reinforced plastics worldwide. The
transportation section represents
the largest and fastest growing
end-use market for reinforced
plastics worldwide followed by
the electrical and electronics and
construction industry.

Glass Mat and Long
Glass Fiber Reinforced
Thermoplastics

Glass mat fiber reinforced

thermoplastics (GMFRT) and long

glass fiber reinforced thermoplastics

(LGFRT) are two most common,
oldest, and commercially successful
reinforced thermoplastics.

GMFRT was developed in mid1960s
for increased stiffness,
strength, toughness (impact) in
melt-processable polymer matrices.
They provide superior fatigue
and creep resistance at moderate
costs. Industrial scale production
capabilities are available. GMFRT

sheet is typically converted to final

part via compression molding,
but parts have been successfully
converted via matched tool
thermoforming. Early GMT featured
PP with continuous/randomly
oriented glass mat reinforcement.
GMFRT has been in existence for
over 30 years. Types of GMFRT
include long glass GMFRT, chopped
glass GMFRT, aerated glass mat
GMFRT, and textile reinforced
GMFRT. On the other hand, LGFRT
was commercialized in mid-tolate
1990s. LGFRT performance is
intermediate between that of GMT

and short glass fiber reinforced

thermoplastics (SGFRT). LGFRT
is historically compounded into
pellets. These compounded pellets
are typically injection molded into

a final part, though there is nothing

preventing using this technology
as the basis for thermoforming.

Figure 3. Applications of Reinforced Thermoplastics by Markets.

Recently, a new type of LFRT
has been developed, using inline
compounding. Fiberglass is
compounded with the plastic matrix
directly at the press via either a
compression or injection molding
operation. In the last decade, LGFRT

has enjoyed significant growth

(20-30% per year). Thermoplastic
matrices for LGFRT includes PP,

HDPE, PA6, PA6,6, PET, PBT, PC,
TPU, ABS, PC/ABS, PPS, POM,

PPA, and ASA copolymer.

Self Reinforced
Thermoplastics

Self-reinforced plastics are
a new family of composite
materials, where the polymer
matrix is reinforced by highly
oriented polymer fibers derived
from the same or similar polymer.
Two techniques for producing
self-reinforced PP materials are
hot-compaction or co-extrusion.
Compared to other reinforced
thermoplastics, self-reinforced
plastic typically offer significant
performance advantages at similar
or reduced costs. For example, a self
reinforced thermoplastic may offer

10 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

the following advantages: weight

reduction, corrosion resistance, ease
of recycling, high impact strength,

resistance to hydraulic fluids and

fuel, lower toxicity, improved
surface, and cost to mass-produce.
Possible applications for a self

reinforced thermoplastic include:

automotive (body panels, parcel

shelves, under-shields, load floors);

off-road vehicles (high-impact

exterior panels); marine (personal
watercraft); sports (helmets,
pads, guards); leisure (suitcases,
loudspeaker cones); personnel
protective equipment (safety
helmets, anti-ballistic shields);

medical (orthoses, temporary

supports); construction (shuttering,

formwork).

Business and Market

Trends

Reinforced thermoplastics are
forecast to outpace reinforced
thermosets according to Fredonia
Group’s 2009 Report on Reinforced
Plastic. Demand is predicted to
increase 2.8% annually to 3.6
billion lbs in 2013. Glass fibers
will continue to be the dominant
reinforcement material through
2013. Carbon fiber is expected
to increase nearly 10% annually
through 2013. Polypropylene will
remain the leading thermoplastic.
Growth is also forecasted for
nylon and thermoplastic polyester.
Construction & motor vehicles is
predicted to account for 60% of
total reinforced plastics demand in
2013.

Processing of Reinforced
Thermoplastics

Historically, reinforced

thermoplastics are converted

to a final part via either an

injection or compression molding

operation. These methods are
still viable, especially in high
volumes and complex geometries.
Thermoforming, however, is
becoming a viable option to convert
reinforced thermoplastics for
similar reasons that thermoforming
has taken hold for unreinforced

materials: the ability to form large,
flat parts of moderate volume.

Since the reinforcing material is
often inorganic in nature, certain
factors should be taken into
account when forming a reinforced
material. It may be that the material
requires less heat to get to forming
temperature. This could result in
either lower energy requirements,
faster cycle times or both.
Conversely, the reinforcing material
may act like a heat sink when
forming against a thermoforming
tool, possibly negating the cycle
time advantage observed during the
heating step.

Additionally, both the loading
percentage and the aspect ratio
of the reinforcing material are
important when considering
thermoforming composite materials.
Since an inorganic reinforcing
material, will not draw or form
when heated, both the draw
ratio and the sharpness of the
radii will become limited as the
reinforcement levels increase. Fiber
reinforcement possessing a high
aspect ratio may cause a sheet to
“loft” when heating. When this
happens, the sheet could become
porous, rendering the material not
formable using traditional vacuum
forming methods. Often, this is the
case with GMFRT. When this is
the case, the material may need to
be thermoformed using matched
tooling.

Technology and
Performance Trends

There is an increasing

requirement of exceptional

mechanical performance with
respect to rigidity, strength,
toughness (impact), and
creep/fatigue resistance. In
automotive, there is a strong
desire to achieve the stiffness

and other performance benefits

of reinforced plastics at a lower
cost. The desire to be able to
incorporate both aesthetics and
functional surface laminated
to reinforced thermoplastic
is increasingly becoming

important. Long fiber reinforced

thermoplastics can be overmolded
on, co-molded with or
bonded to metals, glass, paint

films, carpeting, fabric and other

decorative materials allowing
cost-effective manufacture

of intricate finished parts that

are light weight, durable, and
aesthetically pleasing. There
is a growing interest in both
nano-reinforced and natural

fiber-reinforced thermoplastic

composites motivated by the
concern to conserve dwindling
resources and to reduce
environmental impact. There
is also strong interest to use
renewable (bio-based) polymers
as matrices. These matrices

when coupled with natural fibers

form what has been regarded as
“Green Composites.”

x

For more information, please
contact Randall Myers at (314)
457-3060 randall.myers@
spartech.com.

(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 11

(continued from previous page)

Some Acronyms Used in Reinforced Thermoplastics

RTP-reinforced thermoplastic

LGF-long glass fiber
SGF-short glass fiber

GMT-glass mat thermoplastic
GRP-glass reinforced plastic

GFRP-glass fiber reinforced plastic or polymer
LFT-long fiber thermoplastic
LFRT-long fiber reinforced thermoplastic
LRP-long fiber reinforced plastic

SRP-short reinforced plastic

SFRT-short fiber reinforced thermoplastic
D-LFT-direct long fiber thermoplastic or inline compounded LGF
CFRT-Continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic
NFRT-Natural fiber reinforced thermoplastics
LWRT-light-weight reinforced thermoplastic

12 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Atlanta, Georgia and the
Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel
will host the
2011 GPEC
Note New Date:
October 16 – October 19, 2011
Exhibits • tEchnical sEssions
PanEl Discussion • Plant tourCheck out the website at: www.sperecycling.org
ISO 9001:2000
REDUCE!
REUSE!
RECYCLE!
REDUCE!
REUSE!
RECYCLE!

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 13

Thermoforming

ANTEC Paper

Quarterly®

Investigation into the Effect of Extrusion and
Thermoforming Parameters on the Properties
of Polypropylene Containers

E. McConville, P. J. Martin and E.M.A. Harkin-Jones, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Queen’s University of Belfast, Ashby Building, Stranmillis Road,
Belfast, BT9 5AH Northern Ireland
Abstract
Introduction
Experimental
14 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Table 1. Extruder settings
Table 2. Thermoforming test settings
Results and Discussion
Figure 1. DSC testing percentage crystallinity results.
Table 1. Extruder settings
Table 2. Thermoforming test settings
Results and Discussion
Figure 1. DSC testing percentage crystallinity results.
(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 15

Figure 3. DMTA results for extruded sheet samples.

Figure 2. Scree plot for the effect of extrusion
parameters and interactions on the % crystallinity of
extruded sheet.

Table 3. Average tensile test results (machine direction)

Figure 4. Comparison of Scree plot % of variation results
for mechanical tests on extruded sheet.

16 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Figure 5. Biaxial stretching results for M3 at 4 s-1 strain.

Figure 6. Comparison of Scree plot % of variation results
for biaxial stretching of extruded sheet.

Figure 7. Plug force results from thermoforming of sheet
produced with different extruder settings.

Figure 8. Container weight results from thermoformed
containers made with sheet of different extruder
settings.

Figure 9. Average wall thickness results from
thermoformed containers made with sheet of different
extruder settings.

(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 17

Figure 10. Compression modulus results from
thermoformed containers made with sheet of different
extruder settings.

Figure 11. Load at 2mm compression results from

thermoformed containers made with sheet of different

extruder settings

Figure 12. Comparison of Scree plot results for effect of
extruder settings on thermoformed container properties.

Figure 13. The variation of plug force during thermoforming
with changes in thermoforming settings.

Figure 14. Scree plot for the effect of thermoforming
parameters on thermoformed container properties.

18 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Figure 15. Results for container weight with changes in
thermoforming settings.

Figure 16. Results for container average wall thickness
with changes in thermoforming settings.

Figure 17. Results for variation in compression modulus
with changes in thermoforming settings.

Figure 18. Results for variation in load at 2mm

compression with changes in thermoforming settings.

(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 19

Figure 19. Comparison of Scree plot results for the % of
variance of the effect of thermoforming parameters on
thermoforming container properties.

Conclusions

Referencesx

Key Words: Thermoforming, Extrusion, Polypropylene, PP,
Biaxial.

Thermoforming Division Membership Benefits

n
n

Access to industry Discounts, discounts, n
For operators: workshops
knowledge from one discounts on books, and presentations that
central location: www. seminars and conferences. will send you home with
thermoformingdivision. new tools to improve your

n
For managers: workshopscom. performance, make your

and presentations tailored
job easier and help the

n
Subscription to specifically to the needs of
company’s bottom line.

Thermoforming your operators.
Quarterly, voted

Join D25 toDay!

“Publication of the Year”
by SPE National.

n
Exposure to new
ideas and trends from
across the globe. If
you don’t think your
company is affected by
globalization, you need
to think again.

n
New and innovative
part design at the Parts
Competition.

n
Open dialogue with the
entire industry at the
annual conference.

20 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

2010 Thermoformer of the Year
A
A
n innovator and visionary helping to
expand an industry, Roger C. Kipp’s
contributions to the plastics industry
include hands-on development of processes
and procedures, furthering education
initiatives, and developing successful
business models.

Roger C. Kipp’s passion, contributions and
innovations for the plastics industry began
in 1967 during his first job out of college as
the assistant plant manager of a small nonferrous
foundry in Cincinnati, OH. During
this time, he saw an opportunity to become
a one-stop source for plastic process tooling
by combining pattern making with foundry
skills. In 1968, he developed the first cast to
form an aluminum injection mold for a major
Cincinnati toy manufacturer. This venture
was soon expanded to include tooling for
heavy-gauge sheet thermoforming and
rotational molding.

From 1967 to 1983, Kipp partnered with
his father and brother to grow their pattern
and foundry business in Cincinnati. As
Operations Manager and Treasurer, he
focused on business development with
expansion of a permanent mold division and
creation of the plastics tooling division.

In 1983, Kipp spun off the plastics tooling
division from the family foundry.

For over 25 years, Kipp devoted his
attention to the construction of aluminum
tooling, developing innovative processes
which improved heat transfer, created new
techniques for forming undercuts, part
ejection, molding inserts and improving
overall cast tooling quality.

Roger C. Kipp
Vice President of Marketing & Engineering

McClarin Plastics, Inc.
Hanover, PA

As the industry evolved, so did Kipp’s
focus. After many years of working with
captive forming and molding operations,
he developed an interest in developing new
plastic components, an interest that extended
beyond tooling. Kipp’s knowledge of the
values and limitations of metals, along with
tooling engineering expertise, provided a
technical advantage to allow him to expand
into large part thermoforming applications
and markets.

In 1987, Kipp directed the start-up of a
vacuum forming and rotational molding
facility in Sidney, OH. While he continued
to oversee tooling construction, this
position was Kipp’s first foray into the sales
and marketing aspects of the industry. He
subsequently developed millions of dollars
of new applications by introducing plastics
innovation to various industries, including
waste management, agricultural and
construction equipment, sound systems, air
handling, and playground equipment.

In 1994, Kipp joined McClarin Plastics in
Hanover, Pennsylvania as Vice President of
Marketing & Engineering. In this position,
he has made it a priority to be involved
in strategic and functional initiatives to
further the company as well as to promote
the plastics industry through affiliation with
various professional organizations.

Kipp has been a member of the Society of
Plastics Engineers Thermoforming Division
Board since 1992. During his tenure on
the Board, he has served as Conference
Chairman (1996), Conference Treasurer,
Division Treasurer and Chairman. As a
member of the Society, he has served as the
Communications Committee Chair and on
the Foundation Executive Committee. The

Society has honored Kipp with the 2002
Outstanding Achievement Award and a
Lifetime Achievement Award in 2003.

With an interest toward the future of the
plastics industry, Kipp has always had
an affinity for education. He is Associate
Professor teaching manufacturing
processes part time at his alma mater,
Miami University in Oxford, OH. Since
then, he has assisted in the development
of numerous industry-wide educational
programs as well as a comprehensive
in-house program at McClarin Plastics.
The McClarin program offers its 200
employees about 40 classes that cover
such topics as blueprint reading, lean
certification, metrology and economics.

Kipp is also instrumental in supporting
McClarin’s aggressive programs focused
on local high school students. These
programs, which include job fairs,
internships and hands-on projects are
designed to spark interest in the industry
and expose students to opportunities in
the field of plastics manufacturing and
engineering.

Kipp serves as a member of the Advisory
Board of the Plastics Manufacturing
Center at the Pennsylvania College of
Technology, an affiliate of Penn State
University. Through them, he is active
with the Pennsylvania Plastics Initiative.

He and his wife Sandy now reside in
Hanover, PA. They have three children
and five grandchildren. Mr. Kipp is
an alumnus of Miami University and

is active with their Alumni Recruiter
Organization. x

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 21

UNIVERSITy NEWS UNIVERSITy NEWS
An Alliance with
Education

Roger C. Kipp, Vice President of Marketing &
Engineering, McClarin Plastics, Inc., and Councilor,
SPE Thermoforming Division

I
I
n this rapidly changing business
environment, the growth and
future of the plastics industry is
connected directly to the development
and creativity of new technologies. No
less important is the communication
and education required to promote
such new technologies. These new
technologies will involve all phases
of our industry including materials,
processing and equipment. In order for
industry to participate and accelerate
the application of these technology
advancements, an alliance with
education is essential.

The educational alliance provides
companies with well-educated
technicians and polymer engineers
with strong academic credentials
supplemented through valuable
industry input. This alliance will
enhance corporate training programs
while developing a more competitive
and knowledgeable workforce with
improved quality and production
performance.

Stiffer global competition and
the increased performance demand
required of our resources as we
emerge from this recession further
drive the need for change. Meeting
these demands will require the
application of carefully selected new
technologies while maintaining a welltrained
workforce.

The Plastics Manufacturing Center
(PMC) at Pennsylvania College of
Technology implements this alliance.
The PMC combines academic,
government and industry resources to
facilitate technology and processing
advancements throughout the plastics
industry.

In 2008, the PMC Advisory Board
recommended that the directors

move forward to launch a National
Thermoforming Center of Excellence
and to undertake a seed money funding
project. The Thermoforming Division
of the Society of Plastics Engineers was
proud to participate as a charter member
providing a substantial donation
toward the seed monies as well as inkind
service from members and their
companies. Grants from Northeastern,
Northern and Central PA Ben Franklin
Technology partners along with many
other corporate and government
sponsors and grants provided further
foundation for our industries alliance
with education.

This Center of Excellence will be the
nucleus of opportunity for all companies
in any aspect of thermoforming to
further research and development. The
services and capabilities of the Center
as well as an application for project
submission are detailed in the following
article.

x

Research and
Development
Assistance

“Thermoforming Center
of Excellence”

Charles (Hank) White, Director of PMC, Pennsylvania
College of Technology

T
T
he Thermoforming Center of
Excellence at Pennsylvania College
of Technology in Williamsport, PA, is
a 1,800-square-foot dedicated support
facility (including classroom space),
research and development facility, and
educational facility to be utilized by
thermoformers, sheet extruders, resin
suppliers, mold builders, and equipment
manufacturers. This center operates
under the umbrella of the Plastics
Manufacturing Center (PMC). The PMC
is one of the top plastics-technology
centers in the country, with extensive
material-testing laboratories, industrialscale
process equipment, world-class

training facilities, and highly skilled
consulting staff.

The Thermoforming Center will also
provide credit and noncredit courses
aimed at preparing students for entering
the workforce as well as furthering the
knowledge of the current workforce
within the thermoforming industry. A
very significant issue facing the plastics
industry is the need for employee
understanding of plastics technology
to capitalize on the latest material and
technological advances.

The Thermoforming Center is
equipped with industrial-scale, state-ofthe-
art process equipment and training
facilities capable of demonstrating a
wide variety of forming techniques.

Project Services

The Thermoforming Center will
provide member- and client-driven
R&D services focused on specific
opportunities and issued related to the
business of developing, manufacturing
and improving of thermoformed sheet
products, for both thick-gauge and
thin-gauge rigid sheet forming. This
Center will conduct specific programs
suggested by industry to advance
manufacturing technology, develop
products and processes, and lower costs.

The Thermoforming Center will
assist with the following: new product
development; material selection, testing,
and analysis; custom compounding;
process improvement and development;
and workforce training. Plastics
professionals will provide the
customized on-site training programs, as
well as the on-campus course. Services
from qualified consultants will be
tailored to plastics product and process
needs.

Potential projects include: (1)
Reduction of material usage through
tooling design advancements and
processing control; (2) Advanced theory
development of mold temperature
control and its effects; (3) Optimization
of vacuum/air to allow faster forming,
better part definition, and faster cycles;

22 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

(4) Documentation and evaluation of the
impact of recycling material properties,
as well as processing to optimize
material recycling capability; and (5)
Bio-materials development research.
Educational Services

The Center will also provide
credit and noncredit courses aimed
at preparing students for entering the
workforce, as well as furthering the
knowledge of the current workforce
within the thermoforming industry.
Academic curriculum will be developed
and thermoforming courses will be
offered within the Plastics and Polymer
Technology program at Penn College,
utilizing the newly renovated process
equipment and lab facilities located in
the Advanced Technology & Health
Sciences Center. Further, the Center will
develop and deliver general and custom
tailored noncredit courses and seminars
to meet the needs of industry members
and client companies. Seminars will be
held at the Center, and specific training
will be delivered on-site as requested by
member companies.

Plastics Consulting, Testing,
Training, and Product
Development

Materials Testing and Analysis

•
Competitive product analysis
•
Mechanical testing
•
Melt flow and rheology
•
Impact testing
•
Failure analysis
•
Quality testing
•
Materials identification
•
Materials deformulation
Technical Support Services

•
Material recommendations and
sourcing
•
Custom compound development
•
Polymer processing
•
Manufacturing process recommendations
•
Mold design
•
Literature search
Product Development

•
Design services
•
Product models
•
Prototyping
•
Mold design/construction
•
Product molding trials
Thermoforming Equipment

The thermoforming machine on-site is an
industrial scale machine with capability
for twin-sheet forming and pressure
forming for both thin-gauge and heavygauge
material. The equipment includes
the following features:

•
Upper and lower moving platens
•
Capable of forming 36″ x 48″ molds
with a depth of 10″
•
Upper and lower heating ovens with
multiple heating zones
•
Sheet clamp frame capable of holding
sheet thicknesses from 0-0.5″
•
Mold temperature control unit capable
of heating & cooling of molds
•
Forming press capable of up to 100psi
of form pressure (40″ x 40″ mold)
•
Servo driven 3rd motion actuators
on upper press platen for accurate
plug assisting and additional mold
platen movements
•
Quick change features
•
1-ton capacity crane mounted to top
of form press
Forming Functions

The thermoforming machine is capable
of performing the following “forming”
functions:

•
Standard drape forming using male
(positive) and female (negative)
molds and combinations thereof with
the use of vacuum (25 InHg)
•
Standard drape forming using male
(positive) and female (negative)
molds and combinations thereof with
the use of vacuum & form air pressure
(50-80psi)
•
Plug assisted vacuum & pressure
forming using third motion plug drive
mechanism
•
Fixed Plug with moving clamp
vacuum and pressure forming
•
Matched metal forming
•
Vacuum snap-back forming
•
Vacuum bleed techniques
•
Light gauge twin-sheet forming
Control Functions

•
PLC and operator touch screen
interface
•
Recipe screens – specific tool and
product forming parameters

•
Timing screens – for precise control
of each forming process
•
Timing history screen
•
Heater control screen – individually
and precisely controlled heater
elements, each with thermocouple
feedback to controller
•
Heater history screen
•
Error screen – showing real time
e-stop, safety gates, heater and
servo errors, etc.
•
Manual settings screen
•
Forming sequence indicator lamps
for vacuum, vacuum bleed, form
air, eject air, and plug bottom
position
•
Additional pneumatic solenoids and
timers for clamp frames, stripper
bars, and mold undercut devices
•
Trimming 5-Axis CNC machine
with 17.5′ x 8.5′ x 30″ capacity
Other Processing
Equipment Available On-
Site

Injection Molding

•
Cincinnati Milacron Injection
Molder, VT110 110 ton, 7 oz. shot
size
•
Battenfeld Austria Injection
Molder, BA 200 CD: 20 ton, 20 g
shot size
•
ASTM Mold Retrofitted with RJG
Associates Data Acquisition System
•
Boy 22 D Injection Molder (2) 20
Ton
•
Nissei ES30000 All Electric
Injection Molder
Blow Molding

•
Bronco 888 Two-Stage Blow
Molder
•
Hesta Extrusion Blow Molder
Extrusion/Compounding

•
Killion Single Screw Extruder, 24/1
L/D 1 lb./hr
•
Film Blowing Tower
•
6″ Sheet Die
•
Leistritz 27 mm Twin Screw
Extruder
•
Gala Underwater Pelletizer
•
Goodman Vacuum Sizer
(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 23

Rotational Molding

•
Med Keff-Nye Shuttle PDTM 42″
Offset Arm Rotomolder
•
Wedco Grinder (75 lbs/hour)
•
Sweco Classifier
•
Datapaq Acquisition System
Auxiliary Equipment

•
Formech 300x Vacuum Former
•
Carver Press Compression Molder
•
Annelaing Oven
•
Pelletizer
•
Plasmec High Intensity Mixer
(101)
Testing Equipment
Available On-Site

Analytical

•
Bio Rad FTS 3000 Excalibur
Series Infrared
•
Spectrophometer
•
Perkin Elmer Pyris 1 Differential
Scranning
•
Calorimeter/Thermal Gravimetric
•
Analysis (TGA
6) System
•
Arizona Instrument Computrax
Moisture
•
Analyzer Max® 2000 XL
Rheological

•
Haake PK 100 Rotational
Viscometer
•
Tinius Olsen Plastometer
•
Tinius Olsen Melt Indexers (2)
•
Rosand RH 2000 Capillary
Rheometer
Physical

•
Weatherometers: Xenon Arc and
QUV
•
Heat Deflection Temperature Tester
•
Izod/Charpy/Tensile Impact Tester
•
Gardner Impact
•
Bulk Density
•
ARM Impact Tester
•
Tinius Olsen H25KS Universal
Testing
•
Machine (UTM) with Environmental
Chamber
•
Load Cells – 25 kN, 5kN, 250N & 50
•
20% Extensometer & Laser
Extensometer
•
Tinius Olsen 1000 UTM (2) with
Tensile and Flexural Fixtures
•
1000 & 50 lb. load cells
•
20% Extensometer
•
Rotap Sieve Particle Size Analyzer
(PSA)
•
Density Gradient Columns
•
Electronic Densimeter MD 200S
Membership Benefits

•
Member directed technical initatives
•
Access to Center research
•
Technical support from Penn College
faculty and staff
•
Access to Penn College plastics
processing and testing labs
•
Networking with member companies
•
Quarterly newsletter x
Pennsylvania College of Technology
Plastics Manufacturing Center, DIF

#26
One College Avenue
Williamsport, PA 17701-5799
Phone: (570) 321-5533
E-mail: pmc@pct.edu
Fax: (570) 320-5248

HYTAC
®

Plug
Assist
Materials

CMT
MATERIALS,INC.

info@cmtmaterials.com
www.cmtmaterials.com
TEL
(508)
226-3901
FAX
(508)
226-3902

Innovative
Tooling
Materials
for
Thermoforming

24 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Visit Our
Website at:
www.thermoformingdivision.com
Our mission is
to facilitate the
advancement of
thermoforming
technologies
through
education,
application,
promotion and
research.
SPE National
Executive Director
Susan Oderwald
Direct Line: 203/740-5471
Fax: 203/775-8490
email: Seoderwald@4spe.org
Conference Coordinator
Gwen Mathis
6 S. Second Street, SE
Lindale, Georgia 30147
706/235-9298
Fax: 706/295-4276
email: gmathis224@aol.com

Need help
with your

REDUCE! REUSE! RECYCLE!

technical school
or college
expenses?

I
I
f you or someone you
know is working towards a career
in the plastic industry, let the SPE
Thermoforming Division help support
those education goals.

Within this past year alone, our
organization has awarded multiple
scholarships! Get involved and take
advantage of available support from
your plastic industry!

Here is a partial list of schools
and colleges whose students have
benefited from the Thermoforming
Division Scholarship Program:

• UMASS Lowell
• San Jose State
• Pittsburg State
• Penn State Erie
• University of
Wisconsin
• Michigan State
• Ferris State
• Madison
Technical College
• Clemson University
• Illinois State
• Penn College
Start by completing the application
forms at www.thermoformingdivision.
com or at www.4spe.com. x

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 25

26 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 27

FIRST CALL FOR SPONSORS/EXHIBITORS
19th Annual Thermoforming Conference & Exhibition
September 18 – 21, 2010
FIRST CALL FOR SPONSORS/EXHIBITORS
19th Annual Thermoforming Conference & Exhibition
September 18 – 21, 2010
MIDWEST AIRLINES CONVENTION CENTER
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
2010

®
T
T
“Embrace the Challenge”

he 19th Annual Thermoforming Conference and Exhibition – Thermoforming 2010:
“Embrace the Challenge” – plans are beginning to take shape. This show will be a forum for
the newest techniques, latest equipment, materials, auxiliary equipment and current industry
news. As an Exhibitor, this event will enable you to showcase your products and services at a show
geared just to THERMOFORMERS! If your company is a player in the THERMOFORMING
INDUSTRY, then this is the place for you to be in 2010. This industry event is a prime opportunity

for you to reach the decision makers in the field and create a brighter future for your business as well.

Full exhibits will be offered. Our machinery section continues to grow each year. If you are not yet participating
in our machinery section, you are encouraged to do so. Each 10′ x 10′ booth is fully piped, draped, carpeted
and a sign will be provided. As an extra value, one comp full registration is included with every booth sold.
This gives your attendees access to all Technical Sessions, Workshops, Special Events, Expert Panel
Discussions and all meals. A great bargain at $2,250.00.

We are also offering our sponsors and exhibitors a forum to present their newest innovations through
presentations at our newly introduced commercial sessions. Your SPONSORSHIP or participation as an
EXHIBITOR has demonstrated its potential to help your sales and it is contributing to the strength and
success of our industry as a whole.

We urge you to join us at THERMOFORMING 2010 in Milwaukee! Reserve your space early to avoid
disappointment. Booth assignments and commerciaal presentation opportunities are made on a first come,
first serve basis.

Should you have questions, please call (706) 235-9298, fax (706) 295-4276
or e-mail to gmathis224@aol.com.

28 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

2010 THERMOFORMING CONFERENCE
September 18 – 21, 2010
2010 THERMOFORMING CONFERENCE
September 18 – 21, 2010
SPONSOR & EXHIBITOR REGISTRATION FORM
(Please complete and return with your check today.)
_______
YES, we want to apply as a 2010 Thermoforming Conference SPONSOR. Enclosed
is our non-refundable deposit check for $2,500. We understand that if our firm is
selected through a “Sponsor Lottery” we will have 14 days after notification to submit
our payment of the additional $2,500 to confirm our Sponsor status. Those firms not
meeting this deadline will relinquish their sponsor position and will be reclassified
as an EXHIBITOR. Additional spaces available at discounted rates. 2nd Booth $2,250,
3rd Booth $2,000, 4 or more, $1,750 each.

WE WILL REQUIRE __________ Booths.
Initial Sponsor Cost … $5,000 – Signup Deadline: December 1, 2009.

_______
YES, we want to be a 2010 THERMOFORMING EXHIBITOR. Enclosed is our check
for $2,250. Additional 10′ x 10′ booths as needed will be 2nd $2,000, 3 or more $1,750
each. We will require _________ Booths. We understand that space assignments will
be assigned after SPONSORS have been selected. Cancellations will be accepted up
to June 1, 2010.

COMPANY NAME: ______________________________________________________________________________________________

CONTACT: _______________________________________________ SIGNATURE: _________________________________________

ADDRESS: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________

CITY/STATE/ZIP: _______________________________________________________________________________________________

PHONE: ____________________________________ FAX: ________________________________

E-MAIL:___________________________________________________________________________

You get one (1) FULL COMP REGISTRATION for each 10′ x 10′ booth space. Please list the person who will be using your
comp registration (subject to change):

MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO:

2010 SPE THERMOFORMING CONFERENCE

MAIL TO:

GWEN MATHIS, CONFERENCE COORDINATOR
SPE THERMOFORMING DIVISION

P. O. BOX 471, 6 SOUTH SECOND STREET, SE
LINDALE, GEORGIA 30147
FAX (706) 295-4276
Please inform us if
you wish to pay by
credit card and we
will arrange for the
transaction with SPE.
E-mail to
gmathis224@aol.com.

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 29

Thermoforming
Quarterly®

The GPEC 2010
Environmental
Sustainability
Awards

Dr. P.M. (Subu) Subramanian, Awards Chair

The GPEC 2010 Awards
program was a phenomenal
success. Over the short time
since the Awards program
was created, its reputation has
spread globally and the number
of nominations has increased
significantly. This year, we had
35 nominations, including some
from China, Japan and other
countries. All of the submissions
represented unique innovations
in plastics: recycling, biobased
polymers, process solutions and
other innovations for greater
environmental sustainability.

All of these participants are
winners and it is unfortunate
that the judges had the job of
picking only one winner in each
category. The winners represent
excellence in the pursuit of
environmental sustainability
in their respective categories.
In recycling, Associated
Packaging (post-consumer PET

Thermoforming and Sustainability

recycled to make food-grade
crystallizable, thermoformed
trays), Mannington (vinyl
floorings), and Nicos Polymers
for recovering PVC from fiber
reinforced vinyl tubings, were
recognized. The elastomeric
polyamide PEBAX made from
naturally derived intermediates
from Arkema won recognition in
the bio-derived polymers category.
The polypropylene filled with a
unique cellulose powder made
from newspaper by Eco Research
in Japan was another winner.
The “Design for Sustainability”
awards were won by Amway
for their “e-spring” home water
purifiers, and Vast for their unique
tire and plastic based paving tiles.
The prestigious Dan Eberhardt
Environmental Sustainability
Award went to Delta Plastics
of the South (Little Rock, AR)
who achieved an extraordinary
goal of reclaiming and recycling
nearly 100% of its used LLDPE
irrigation tubings. The company
is now recycling a large portion
of competitors’ tubing as well.
In addition, 1,436,000 pounds
(650 metric tons) per month of
miscellaneous LDPE products
were recycled into certified
post-consumer resin. In these
efforts they not only created the
required infrastructure but also
worked cooperatively with the
communities, organizations, and
local governments in doing so.
These innovations are inspiring. x

Competition
Sponsored by Battelle
at GPEC® 2010 is
a Showcase for
Emerging Companies
with Technologies
for Use of Renewable
Material and Energy
Resources

BROOKFIELD, CT, U.S.A,
March 8, 2010

A new monomer platform
technology developed by
Avantium for creating biopolymers
and biofuels from biomass through
the creation of furanic chemical
building blocks received the top
award in the third annual Clean
Technology Business Forum
and Competition, as announced
today by the Society of Plastics
Engineers (SPE). Organized by
SPE’s Environmental Division,
the event took place at the recent
Global Plastics Environmental
Conference (GPEC) in Orlando,
FL. The second-place honor went
to VAST Enterprises LLC, for a
new composite masonry product
made of post-consumer rubber
and plastics. The winners came
from more than twenty companies
participating in the competition,
including the top six finalists
which presented at GPEC. Sponsor
of the competition was Battelle,
the international non-profit R&D
organization. The competition

30 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

was judged by representatives
from Battelle, Cascadia Capital,
Emerald Technology Ventures,

Modern Plastics Worldwide

magazine, SPM Technologies,
and the winner of the 2009
competition, FRX Polymers. Eric
Koester, an attorney with the law
firm Cooley Godward Kronish
LLP, served as coordinator of
the Clean Technology Forum.
“SPE’s Clean Technology
competition is an opportunity for
inventors, emerging companies,
and established firms with
revenues under $5-million to
present innovations that make
possible the use of materials and
energy from renewable sources,
substantially reduce resource
consumption, or dramatically
reduce or eliminate emissions
and waste,” said Environmental
Division chairperson Susan M.
Kozora, engineering manager
of International Automotive
Components (IAC). x

SAVE THE
DATE!
October 16 thru
October 19, 2011
Westin Peachtree
Plaza Hotel
Atlanta, Georgia
Award Winners Open
New Possibilities
for New Monomer
and Green Building
Technologies

First place winner Avantium is
involved in the development and
commercialization of furanics
biopolymers and biofuels. The
company is developing an efficient
and low cost process to convert
carbohydrates into furanics on the
basis of novel chemical catalytic
technology. Already covered by
15 patents, the technology could
be used to create a biobased route
to polyesters, polyamides, and
polyurethane, with the technology
applying polycondensation for
polymerization that could allow
it to run on retrofitted reactors.
The company has developed a
technology for the economic
production of furanics from
biomass. Furanics are building
blocks to produce a wide range
of green plastics, chemicals
and materials, as well as for
green fuels. Avantium’s furanic
technology offers the potential
to enhance and change the
global plastics industry, as these
green building blocks can now
be produced economically for
a wide range of materials and
applications. The Chief Executive
Officer of the Amsterdam-based
company is Tom van Aken.

www.avantium.com

Runner-up VAST Enterprises
LLC has developed patented
material science technology
to turn postconsumer recycled
rubber and plastics into a new

green building material:
composite masonry. VAST
develops and manufactures
composite products that offer
an engineered, green alternative
to molded concrete and clay
brick. VAST’s injection-molded
product, which consists of postconsumer
rubber and plastics
combined into composite
masonry. Molded into pavers
and other products, the product
is pitched as an alternative to
molded concrete or clay bricks.
Launched in 2007, the bricks,
which are supplied with a
molded sub-structure to ease
installation and alignment,
are made from 95% recycled
materials, and compared to
the concrete they’re aiming
to replace, use 82% less
energy and 89% less carbon
dioxide in their manufacture.
Available in different colors,
the company supplies the
bricks with a 10-year warranty,
but offers a lifetime warranty
against cracking and expects
a product life of 25-30 years.
At GPEC 2010, the company
was also awarded the SPE
Environmental Division: Design
for Sustainability award. The
Chief Executive Officer of the
Minneapolis-based company is
Andy Vander Woude.

www.vastpavers.com x

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 31

32 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

SAVE THE
DATE!!
MILWAUKEE,
WISCONSIN
SEPTEMBER
19th – 21st, 2010
SIGN UP TODAY
FOR EXHIBITOR
SPACE.
Contact
Gwen Mathis,
Conference
Coordinator,
at
gmathis224@aol.com,
706.235.9298 (ph), or
706.295.4276 (fx).

2010
EDITORIAL
CALENDAR

Quarterly Deadlines for

Copy and Sponsorships

ALL FINAL COPY FOR
EDITORIAL APPROVAL

30-JAN Spring 15-APR Summer

31-JUL Fall 30-OCT Winter

Post-Conference Edition

All artwork to be sent in .eps
or .jpg format with minimum
300dpi resolution.

Become a
Thermoforming
Quarterly Sponsor
in 2010!

Do you like the
new look?

Additional sponsorship
opportunities will include
4-color, full page, and
1/2 page.

RESERVE YOUR PRIME
SPONSORSHIP
SPACE TODAY.

Questions? Call or email
Laura Pichon
Ex-Tech Plastics
847-829-8124
Lpichon@extechplastics.com

BOOK SPACE
IN 2010!

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 33

Executive
Committee

2010 – 2012

CHAIR

Ken Griep
Portage Casting & Mold
2901 Portage Road
Portage, WI 53901
(608) 742-7137
Fax (608) 742-2199
ken@pcmwi.com

CHAIR ELECT

Phil Barhouse
Spartech Packaging Technologies
100 Creative Way, PO Box 128
Ripon, WI 54971
(920) 748-1119
Fax (920) 748-9466
phil.barhouse@spartech.com

TREASURER

James Alongi
Maac Machinery
590 Tower Blvd.
Carol Stream, IL 60188
(630) 665-1700
Fax (630) 665-7799
jalongi@maacmachinery.com

SECRETARY

Mike Sirotnak
Solar Products
228 Wanaque Avenue
Pompton Lakes, NJ 07442
(973) 248-9370
Fax (973) 835-7856
msirotnak@solarproducts.com

COUNCILOR WITH TERM
ENDING ANTEC 2010

Roger Kipp
McClarin Plastics
P. O. Box 486, 15 Industrial Drive
Hanover, PA 17331
(717) 637-2241 x4003
Fax (717) 637-4811
rkipp@mcclarinplastics.com

PRIOR CHAIR

Brian Ray
Ray Products
1700 Chablis Avenue
Ontario, CA 91761
(909) 390-9906, Ext. 216
Fax (909) 390-9984
brianr@rayplastics.com

2010 – 2012 THERMOFORMING DIVISION ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

UPCOMING
CONFERENCES
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
SEPTEMBER 19 – 21, 2010
SCHAUMBURG, ILLINOIS
SEPTEMBER 17 – 20, 2011
Chair
Ken Griep
Chair Elect
Phil Barhouse
Finance
Bob Porsche
Technical Committees
Processing
Walt Speck
Materials
Roger Jean
Machinery
Don Kruschke
Secretary
Mike Sirotnak
Nominating
Dennis Northrop
Publications /
Advertising
Laura Pichon
Newsletter / Technical
Editor
Conor Carlin
OPCOM
Phil Barhouse
Treasurer
James Alongi
AARC
Rich Freeman
Student Programs
Brian Winton
Councilor
Roger Kipp
Prior Chair
Brian Ray
2010 Conference
Milwaukee
Clarissa Schroeder
Antec
Brian Winton
Membership
Haydn Forward
Marketing
Don Kruschke
Recognition
Juliet Goff
Web Site
Rich Freeman
Green Committee
Steve Hasselbach
2011 Conference
Schaumburg, IL
James Alongi
Conference Coordinator
Consultant
Gwen Mathis
34 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Board of Directors
MACHINERY
COMMITTEE
James Alongi
Maac Machinery
590 Tower Blvd.
Carol Stream, IL 60188
T: 630.665.1700
F: 630.665.7799
jalongi@maacmachinery.com
Roger Fox
The Foxmor Group
373 S. Country Farm Road
Suite 202
Wheaton, IL 60187
T: 630.653.2200
F: 630.653.1474
rfox@foxmor.com
Hal Gilham
Productive Plastics, Inc.
103 West Park Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08045
T: 856.778.4300
F: 856.234.3310
halg@productiveplastics.com
Bill Kent
Brown Machine
330 North Ross Street
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.7741
F: 989.435.2821
bill.kent@brown-machine.com
Don Kruschke (Chair)
Stopol, Inc.
31875 Solon Road
Solon, OH 44139
T: 440.498.4000
F: 440.498.4001
donk@stopol.com
Brian Winton
Modern Machinery
PO Box 423
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.9071
F: 989.435.3940
bwinton@modernmachineinc.com
MATERIALS
COMMITTEE
Jim Armor
Armor & Associates
16181 Santa Barbara Lane
Huntington Beach, CA 92649
T: 714.846.7000
F: 714.846.7001
jimarmor@aol.com
Phil Barhouse
Spartech Packaging
Technologies
100 Creative Way
PO Box 128
Ripon, WI 54971
T: 920.748.1119
F: 920.748.9466
phil.barhouse@spartech.com
Juliet Goff
Kal Plastics, Inc.
2050 East 48th Street
Vernon, CA 90058-2022
T: 323.581.6194
Donald Hylton
McConnell Company
646 Holyfield Highway
Fairburn, GA 30213
T: 678.772.5008
don@thermoforming.com
Roger P. Jean (Chair)
Rowmark/PMC
PO Box 1605
2040 Industrial Drive
Findlay, OH 45840
T: 567.208.9758
rjean@rowmark.com
Bill McConnell
McConnell Company
3030 Sandage Street
PO Box 11512
Fort Worth, TX 76110
T: 817.926.8287
F: 817.926.8298
billmc@thermoforming.com
Dennis Northrop
Avery Dennison Performance Films
650 W. 67th Avenue
Schererville, IN 46375
T: 219.322.5030
F: 219.322.2623
dennis.northrop@averydennison.com
Laura Pichon
Ex-Tech Plastics
PO Box 576
11413 Burlington Road
Richmond, IL 60071
T: 847.829.8124
F: 815.678.4248
lpichon@extechplastics.com
Robert G. Porsche
General Plastics
2609 West Mill Road
Milwaukee, WI 53209
T: 414.351.1000
F: 414.351.1284
bob@genplas.com
Walt Speck (Chair)
Speck Plastics, Inc.
PO Box 421
Nazareth, PA 18064
T: 610.759.1807
F: 610.759.3916
wspeck@speckplastics.com
Mark Strachan
Global Thermoforming
Technologies
1550 SW 24th Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
T: 754.224.7513
globalmarks@hotmail.com
Jay Waddell
Plastics Concepts & Innovations
1127 Queensborough Road
Suite 102
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
T: 843.971.7833
F: 843.216.6151
jwaddell@plasticoncepts.com
Clarissa Schroeder
Invista S.A.R.L
1551 Sha Lane
Spartanburg, SC 29307
T: 864.579.5047
F: 864.579.5288
Clarissa.Schroeder@invista.com
PROCESSING
COMMITTEE
Art Buckel
McConnell Company
3452 Bayonne Drive
San Diego, CA 92109
T: 858.273.9620
F: 858.273.6837
artbuckel@thermoforming.com
Haydn Forward
Specialty Manufacturing Co.
6790 Nancy Ridge Road
San Diego, CA 92121
T: 858.450.1591
F: 858.450.0400
hforward@smi-mfg.com
Richard Freeman
Freetech Plastics
2211 Warm Springs Court
Fremont, CA 94539
T: 510.651.9996
F: 510.651.9917
rfree@freetechplastics.com
Ken Griep
Portage Casting & Mold
2901 Portage Road
Portage, WI 53901
T: 608.742.7137
F: 608.742.2199
ken@pcmwi.com
Steve Hasselbach
CMI Plastics
222 Pepsi Way
Ayden, NC 28416
T: 252.746.2171
F: 252.746.2172
steve@cmiplastics.com
Bret Joslyn
Joslyn Manufacturing
9400 Valley View Road
Macedonia, OH 44056
T: 330.467.8111
F: 330.467.6574
bret@joslyn-mfg.com
Stephen Murrill
Profile Plastics
65 S. Waukegan
Lake Bluff, IL 60044
T: 847.604.5100 x29
F: 847.604.8030
smurrill@thermoform.com
Board of Directors
MACHINERY
COMMITTEE
James Alongi
Maac Machinery
590 Tower Blvd.
Carol Stream, IL 60188
T: 630.665.1700
F: 630.665.7799
jalongi@maacmachinery.com
Roger Fox
The Foxmor Group
373 S. Country Farm Road
Suite 202
Wheaton, IL 60187
T: 630.653.2200
F: 630.653.1474
rfox@foxmor.com
Hal Gilham
Productive Plastics, Inc.
103 West Park Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08045
T: 856.778.4300
F: 856.234.3310
halg@productiveplastics.com
Bill Kent
Brown Machine
330 North Ross Street
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.7741
F: 989.435.2821
bill.kent@brown-machine.com
Don Kruschke (Chair)
Stopol, Inc.
31875 Solon Road
Solon, OH 44139
T: 440.498.4000
F: 440.498.4001
donk@stopol.com
Brian Winton
Modern Machinery
PO Box 423
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.9071
F: 989.435.3940
bwinton@modernmachineinc.com
MATERIALS
COMMITTEE
Jim Armor
Armor & Associates
16181 Santa Barbara Lane
Huntington Beach, CA 92649
T: 714.846.7000
F: 714.846.7001
jimarmor@aol.com
Phil Barhouse
Spartech Packaging
Technologies
100 Creative Way
PO Box 128
Ripon, WI 54971
T: 920.748.1119
F: 920.748.9466
phil.barhouse@spartech.com
Juliet Goff
Kal Plastics, Inc.
2050 East 48th Street
Vernon, CA 90058-2022
T: 323.581.6194
Donald Hylton
McConnell Company
646 Holyfield Highway
Fairburn, GA 30213
T: 678.772.5008
don@thermoforming.com
Roger P. Jean (Chair)
Rowmark/PMC
PO Box 1605
2040 Industrial Drive
Findlay, OH 45840
T: 567.208.9758
rjean@rowmark.com
Bill McConnell
McConnell Company
3030 Sandage Street
PO Box 11512
Fort Worth, TX 76110
T: 817.926.8287
F: 817.926.8298
billmc@thermoforming.com
Dennis Northrop
Avery Dennison Performance Films
650 W. 67th Avenue
Schererville, IN 46375
T: 219.322.5030
F: 219.322.2623
dennis.northrop@averydennison.com
Laura Pichon
Ex-Tech Plastics
PO Box 576
11413 Burlington Road
Richmond, IL 60071
T: 847.829.8124
F: 815.678.4248
lpichon@extechplastics.com
Robert G. Porsche
General Plastics
2609 West Mill Road
Milwaukee, WI 53209
T: 414.351.1000
F: 414.351.1284
bob@genplas.com
Walt Speck (Chair)
Speck Plastics, Inc.
PO Box 421
Nazareth, PA 18064
T: 610.759.1807
F: 610.759.3916
wspeck@speckplastics.com
Mark Strachan
Global Thermoforming
Technologies
1550 SW 24th Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
T: 754.224.7513
globalmarks@hotmail.com
Jay Waddell
Plastics Concepts & Innovations
1127 Queensborough Road
Suite 102
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
T: 843.971.7833
F: 843.216.6151
jwaddell@plasticoncepts.com
Clarissa Schroeder
Invista S.A.R.L
1551 Sha Lane
Spartanburg, SC 29307
T: 864.579.5047
F: 864.579.5288
Clarissa.Schroeder@invista.com
PROCESSING
COMMITTEE
Art Buckel
McConnell Company
3452 Bayonne Drive
San Diego, CA 92109
T: 858.273.9620
F: 858.273.6837
artbuckel@thermoforming.com
Haydn Forward
Specialty Manufacturing Co.
6790 Nancy Ridge Road
San Diego, CA 92121
T: 858.450.1591
F: 858.450.0400
hforward@smi-mfg.com
Richard Freeman
Freetech Plastics
2211 Warm Springs Court
Fremont, CA 94539
T: 510.651.9996
F: 510.651.9917
rfree@freetechplastics.com
Ken Griep
Portage Casting & Mold
2901 Portage Road
Portage, WI 53901
T: 608.742.7137
F: 608.742.2199
ken@pcmwi.com
Steve Hasselbach
CMI Plastics
222 Pepsi Way
Ayden, NC 28416
T: 252.746.2171
F: 252.746.2172
steve@cmiplastics.com
Bret Joslyn
Joslyn Manufacturing
9400 Valley View Road
Macedonia, OH 44056
T: 330.467.8111
F: 330.467.6574
bret@joslyn-mfg.com
Stephen Murrill
Profile Plastics
65 S. Waukegan
Lake Bluff, IL 60044
T: 847.604.5100 x29
F: 847.604.8030
smurrill@thermoform.com
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 35

Thermoforming
Quarterly®
SECOND QUARTER 2010
VOLUME 29 n NUMBER 2
Sponsor Index These sponsors enable us to publish Thermoforming Quarterly
Thermoforming
Quarterly®
SECOND QUARTER 2010
VOLUME 29 n NUMBER 2
Sponsor Index These sponsors enable us to publish Thermoforming Quarterly
n Allen ……………………………13
n Brown Machine……………….33
n CMT Materials ………………..24
n Frimo …………………………..12
n GN Plastics ……………………32
n GPEC 2011 ……………………13
n Kiefel …………………………..12
n KMT …………………………….36
n Kydex ……… Inside Back Cover
n Maac Machinery………………33
n McClarin Plastics……………..32
n Nova Chemicals………….Inside

Front Cover
n PCI ……………………………..12
n PMC ………………….Back Cover
n Portage Casting & Mold……..32
n Primex Plastics ……………….13
n Productive Plastics Corp. …..13
n Profile Plastics Corp. ………..13
n PTi ………………………………34
n Ray Products………………….13
n Solar Products………………..32
n Tempco ………………………..36
n Thermoforming Machinery &

Equipment Inc. …………….20
n Thermwood……………………25
n TPS …………………………….25
n Zed Industries………………..13

KMT ROBOTIC SOLUTIONS
robotic.na@kmtgroup.com
or Paul Schuch at (616) 443-2777
The leaders in robotic trimming
for the thermoforming industry
36 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Leave a Reply