Quarterly Mags: 2010 3rd

Quarterly®
Thermoforming
A JOURNAL OF THE THERMOFORMING DIVISION OF THE SOCIETY OF PLASTIC ENGINEERS THIRD QUARTER 2010 n VOLUME 29 n NUMBER 3
®
Quarterly®
Thermoforming
A JOURNAL OF THE THERMOFORMING DIVISION OF THE SOCIETY OF PLASTIC ENGINEERS THIRD QUARTER 2010 n VOLUME 29 n NUMBER 3
®
NSIDE …I
Texture in the Digital Age page 10
New Energy Saving Cost Models page 14
Scholarship Winners pages 24-25

WWW.THERMOFORMINGDIVISION.COM

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Visit our Booth 415 September 18-20, 2010 Milwaukee, WI

Thermoforming
Quarterly®
Thermoforming
Quarterly®
THIRD QUARTER 2010
VOLUME 29 n NUMBER 3
Contents
n
Departments
Chairman’s Corner x 2
Thermoforming in the News x 4
Council Summary x
21
University News x
26

The Sky’s the Limit
n
Features
Industry Practice x
6

Undercuts and Tooling Design for Heavy-Gauge
Thermoforming

Industry Practice x
10

Texture in the Digital Age

The Art of Thermoforming x
12

Eddyline Kayak

The Business of
Thermoforming x
14

Thermoforming Optimization: Improving Process Efficiency
and Lowering Energy Consumption

n
In This Issue
William McConnell Memorial x
5
2010 Scholarship Winners x
24-25

Scholarship Winners

19th Annual Conference x
28-29

A JOURNAL PUBLISHED EACH
CALENDAR QUARTER BY THE
THERMOFORMING DIVISION
OF THE SOCIETY OF
PLASTICS ENGINEERS

Editor

Conor Carlin

(617) 771-3321
cpcarlin@gmail.com
Sponsorships

Laura Pichon

(847) 829-8124
Fax (815) 678-4248
lpichon@extechplastics.com
Conference Coordinator

Gwen Mathis

(706) 235-9298
Fax (706) 295-4276
gmathis224@aol.com
Thermoforming Quarterly® is published
four times annually as an informational
and educational bulletin to
the members of the Society of Plastics
Engineers, Thermoforming Division,
and the thermoforming industry. The
name, “Thermoforming Quarterly®”
and its logotype, are registered trademarks
of the Thermoforming Division
of the Society of Plastics Engineers, Inc.
No part of this publication may be reproduced
in any form or by any means
without prior written permission of the
publisher, copyright holder. Opinions
of the authors are their own, and the
publishers cannot be held responsible
for opinions or representations of any
unsolicited material. Printed in the

U.S.A.
Thermoforming Quarterly® is registered
in the U.S. Patent and Trademark
Office (Registration no. 2,229,747).

Page 26

Cover Story

Cover photo is courtesy of
Tom Derrer, Eddyline Kayak
All Rights Reserved 2010
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 1

Thermoforming
Quarterly® Chairman’s Corner
Ken Griep
As we close out the
summer, we forge ahead with renewed
interest in the growth and anticipation
of business success. On behalf of
SPE, I would like to welcome you to
our annual conference in Milwaukee,
Wisconsin, September 18th through
September 21st. More than ever,
this conference is provided as an
opportunity to help and inspire you to
continue developing your strategies.
As you canvass the exhibit hall and
participate in the high quality technical
programs, I want to encourage you to

find new ideas and new opportunities.

The participating vendors and experts
are here to both educate and inspire
you and your company with new
innovative concepts such as energy
saving devices and process-enhanced
capabilities.

The conference, sponsored by
your SPE Thermoforming Division,
provides a single location in
which will be showcased the latest
innovations in material science
and process techniques, as well as
machinery developments and tooling
disciplines. We encourage you to bring
your ideas and your questions to the
conference. Within the walls of the
conference center, the Thermoforming
Division has a mass array of
innovation briefs. It is here that your
networking skills will be amplified

as many of the best connections
and conversations are made in the
hallways.

In the days and weeks following
the conference, I encourage you to
grow your business with the same
enthusiasm you experienced during the
conference. In and around your plant,
meet with all of your co-workers.
Provide them with the details and
innovations you have learned while
in Milwaukee. Chances are this
interaction will spark dialog on new
grounds of process improvements.
More importantly, a challenge to your
co-workers will get them involved
with ideas and possible innovations.
Next year, they too may attend the
conference and experience firsthand
the excitement of this great event!

So how is your business doing?
Indications show that some areas
of the country are feeling a slight
increase in traffic in new product
development. Other areas are still
struggling. Throughout my discussions
with many thermoformers, all agree
that there is still uncertainty in our
future. However, even with this
uncertainty, some are very blessed
with current levels of production.

Our work is still not done! We
need to educate our audiences that
thermoforming is the process of
choice. We need to increase our
education practices for customers
on new materials that we can offer
and the effects on part performances.
Our websites should explain that our
process is repeatable. If the product
is designed with thermoforming in
mind, it can and will meet the client’s
requirements, but in most cases, it
will exceed their requirements while
decreasing the time to market.

While keeping the doors of your
business opened, there is still another
challenge out there. Each of us
needs to keep current with political
issues on the local, state and of
course the federal levels. Keeping
the doors open and production lines
flowing effortlessly may be the

easy part compared with staying
current on political issues these days.
Our government has new taxation
looming around the corner while
telling businesses how they should
operate. New laws and government
involvement will impact all
manufacturing sectors. I ask you to
stay politically current as you focus on
your core business. Strive to develop
new process techniques and business
relationships. This will not only
improve your bottom line but also may
help save a little green outside! Be

aware of what our elected officials are

saying and doing.

Moving past politics, there is some
positive news to report. This past year
your SPE Thermoforming Division
was selected to received the Gold
Pinnacle Award as recognition for
creating outstanding member value
within SPE. It is a true testament of
the hard work that this organization
has compiled these past years. Way
to go! We also thank all our members
for their help and support making this
award possible.

With this quarterly issue also
comes sad news. As Chairman, it is
my duty to inform you of the passing
of two fellow members from our
thermoforming industry: William K.
McConnell on June 5th and David

M. Bestwick on July 18th. Both were
a true inspiration to our industry
and will be greatly missed. The
SPE Thermoforming Division and
associated industries would like to
extend our thoughts and prayers to
their families.
Thank you for your continued
support and get the word out: Do
Thermoforming!

If you have any view points or
comments please feel free to contact
me. I would like to hear from you.

Ken@pcmwi.com

2 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Thermoforming
Quarterly® New Members
Mike O’Hara
C&K Plastics
Metuchen, NJ
Gary D. Watts
The Tegrant Corporation
De Kalb, IL
Elmer Escobar
C&K Plastics
Metuchen, NJ
Scott A. Brown
Replex Plastics
Mount Vernon, OH
Nicole F. Whiteman
NatureWorks LLC
Minnetonka, MN
Paul Sturgeon
KLA Industries, Inc.
Cincinnati, OH
Kara A. Shell
Replex Plastics
Mount Vernon, OH
Mike Hanson
Fabri-Kal
Kalamazoo, MI
Matt Piercy
Printpack Inc.
Williamsburg, VA
David Fry
Brentwood Industries
Inc.
Reading, PA
Patrick Monahan
Thule
Southbury, CT
James Radford
Howard City, MI
Michael Suchocki
Tekra Corp.
New Berlin, WI
Tyler Martin
Octal Inc.
Plano, TX
J. Negrey
Poly Form Int’l. Inc.
Knox, IN
Matthew P. Werden
Saint Clair, MI
David J. Lawrence
Master Pac Corp.
St. Louis, MO
Dan Kellenberger
EGR USA
Ontario, CA
Ronald Staub
Say Plastics Inc.
McSherrystown, PA
Dale Akin
Jamestown Plastics Inc.
Brocton, NY
Joe Campbell
Packaging Plus LLC
La Mirada, CA
Darrel J. Blocksom
Tek Packaging
Huntley, IL
James Hutter
Federal Way, WA
James Tedesco
SencorpWhite
Hyannis, MA
Kathy Ying Xuan
PARC Corporation
Romeoville, IL
Michael Vallafskey
T. O. Plastics, Inc.
Clearwater, MN
Ned R. Pendleton
Pactiv Corporation
Lake Forest, IL
Ataulla Khan
Interplast Co. Ltd.
Sharjah, UAE
Gustavo Gomes De Amorim
Curitiba Parana CEP, Brazil
Rangasamy Pitchai
Mason, OH
Harold A. Keller
K&K Thermoforming, Inc.
Southbridge, MA
Tadhg Whooley Andrew Mitchell
Thermoforming
Quarterly® New Members
Mike O’Hara
C&K Plastics
Metuchen, NJ
Gary D. Watts
The Tegrant Corporation
De Kalb, IL
Elmer Escobar
C&K Plastics
Metuchen, NJ
Scott A. Brown
Replex Plastics
Mount Vernon, OH
Nicole F. Whiteman
NatureWorks LLC
Minnetonka, MN
Paul Sturgeon
KLA Industries, Inc.
Cincinnati, OH
Kara A. Shell
Replex Plastics
Mount Vernon, OH
Mike Hanson
Fabri-Kal
Kalamazoo, MI
Matt Piercy
Printpack Inc.
Williamsburg, VA
David Fry
Brentwood Industries
Inc.
Reading, PA
Patrick Monahan
Thule
Southbury, CT
James Radford
Howard City, MI
Michael Suchocki
Tekra Corp.
New Berlin, WI
Tyler Martin
Octal Inc.
Plano, TX
J. Negrey
Poly Form Int’l. Inc.
Knox, IN
Matthew P. Werden
Saint Clair, MI
David J. Lawrence
Master Pac Corp.
St. Louis, MO
Dan Kellenberger
EGR USA
Ontario, CA
Ronald Staub
Say Plastics Inc.
McSherrystown, PA
Dale Akin
Jamestown Plastics Inc.
Brocton, NY
Joe Campbell
Packaging Plus LLC
La Mirada, CA
Darrel J. Blocksom
Tek Packaging
Huntley, IL
James Hutter
Federal Way, WA
James Tedesco
SencorpWhite
Hyannis, MA
Kathy Ying Xuan
PARC Corporation
Romeoville, IL
Michael Vallafskey
T. O. Plastics, Inc.
Clearwater, MN
Ned R. Pendleton
Pactiv Corporation
Lake Forest, IL
Ataulla Khan
Interplast Co. Ltd.
Sharjah, UAE
Gustavo Gomes De Amorim
Curitiba Parana CEP, Brazil
Rangasamy Pitchai
Mason, OH
Harold A. Keller
K&K Thermoforming, Inc.
Southbridge, MA
Tadhg Whooley Andrew Mitchell
Ceramicx Ireland Ltd.
Ballydehob Co. Cork, Ireland
Bonnie Hinze
Oscar Mayer
Madison, WI
Raymond S. Harp
Rowmark
Findlay, OH
Patrick Johnsen
PTi
Aurora, IL
Thomas Huber
Kiefel GmbH
Freilassing, Germany
Phil LaViolette
Minimizer
Blooming Prairie, MN
Lee J. Major
Visionpak Pty. Ltd.
Bayswater, VIC Australia
Joy Sarmiento Falaminiano
Higher Institute for Plastics
Fabrication
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Rich J. Lucia
C W Thomas
Philadelphia, PA
Ross Norman Hall
Award Plastics & Displays
Christchurch, New Zealand
Dirk Smith
Boca Raton, FL
David R. McIntosh
Fabri-Kal Corporation
Kalamazoo, MI
Angelo Vissas
Processing Technologies International
Joel D. Schmidt
Perfecseal
Oshkosh, WI
Jim Cowan
Alto Packaging Ltd.
Hastings, New Zealand
Solo Cup Company
Lake Forest, IL
Amelia Cheever
J.P. Plastics, Inc.
Bridgewater, MA
Benjamin Mueth
Southern Illinois University
Edwardsville
Belleville, IL
Roger D. Hanna, Jr.
Highland Corporation
Mulberry, FL
Trevor J. Foster
Packaging Needs Pty. Ltd.
Dandenong South, Australia
John Thackray
Kydex LLC
Bloomsburg, PA
Dave Carstensen
Xact Wire Edm. Corp.
Waukesha, WI
Huy P. Thach
Rexam Food Containers
Union, MO
Michael Sherrill
Fabri-Kal Corp.
Hazle Twp., PA
Ronald P. Kelly
CM Packaging
Lake Zurich, IL
John Ammons
Inline Plastics Corp.
McDonough, GA
Brian Wingard
GDC
Goshen, IN
Joel M. Cormier
Oakwood Energy Management
Dearborn, MI
Michael R. Merwin
FLEXcon
Spencer, MA
Yannick Demers
St.-Jean-sur-Richelieu, QC, Canada
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 3

Thermoforming in the news
Plastics Packaging:
Sonoco requires
APT, leading CPET
tray thermoformer

By Matt Defosse, PlasticsToday.com
Published: June 30th, 2010

Associated Packaging Technologies
Inc., which claims to be the world’s
leading processor of crystallized
polyethylene terephthalate (CPET)
trays, has been scooped up by
Sonoco, one of the world’s largest
packaging processors. Sonoco paid
about $120 million all-cash for
APT, a price that includes the cost
of paying off various obligations of
APT.

Why APT? In a statement,
Harris DeLoach Jr., president
and CEO at Sonoco, explained,
“With this acquisition, Sonoco

has significantly expanded its

existing thermoforming plastic
container capabilities into the
growing global frozen, chilled and
ready-to-eat food markets. While
APT is today the leading global
supplier of CPET containers,
we believe its proprietary
material formulations and rotary
thermoforming technology provide

a strong platform for significant

product development and growth.
In addition, this acquisition will
help accelerate Sonoco’s current
development of multilayer barrier
polypropylene food containers.”

Sonoco expects the acquisition
to be modestly accretive this
year and is expected to generate
annualized sales of approximately
$150 million. APT was previously

majority owned by investment funds
controlled by Castle Harlan Inc.

APT runs thermoforming
facilities in Ontario, Canada; at
two sites (Chillicothe, MO and
Waynesville, NC) in the U.S.;
and at Carrickmacross, Ireland,
and employs more than 400
workers. CPET trays are dualovenable
(conventional and
microwave) and see use primarily
in packaging of ready-to-eat frozen
meals. APT’s capacity is enough
to process some 3 billion CPET

containers annually; it standardizes
on extrusion machinery from Davis-
Standard and thermoformers
from Lyle.

Last year, APT announced it
was adding polypropylene and

multi-layer film extrusion and

thermoforming capacity to its
Cambridge, ON facility, raising
capacity there by about 8 million

lbs./year. It also was the first

processor in the U.S. to thermoform
frozen meal trays incorporating postconsumer
recycled plastic. x

Thermoforming Division
Receives
Gold Pinnacle Award

The Pinnacle Award recognizes achievements by SPE Sections and
Divisions that successfully create and deliver member value in four
categories: Organization, Technical Programming, Membership, and
Communication. Two levels of the award are available – Silver and Gold –
and the Thermoforming Division received a Gold Pinnacle Award this year.

Pictured are Roger Kipp, Councilor (left) receiving the award from Paul
Anderson, 2009-2010 SPE President, at the Leadership Awards Luncheon
at ANTEC in Orlando, Florida this past May.

4 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

In Memoriam
William Keller McConnell, Jr.
In Memoriam
William Keller McConnell, Jr.
The Thermoforming Industry has
suffered a great loss with the passing
of William “Bill” K. McConnell, Jr. If
one individual could be identified as a
major contributor to the technical growth
of our industry, it would surely be Bill.
Founder and President of the McConnell
Company, Inc., Bill died on June 5, 2010
after a very short illness. Over the years,
as a consultant to the plastics industry,
Bill became a colleague, a mentor, an
instructor and a good friend to countless
people in our industry and those
associated with it.

Active in the thermoforming
industry since 1948, Bill McConnell
was a dedicated alumnus of Texas
A&M University where he majored in
Aeronautical Engineering. He spent the
WWII years teaching aerial navigation
for the Navy. In the post-war years, he
started and operated a non-scheduled
airline for two years. His personal life, as
well as his business life, represented a
full palate of activities. He and his wife
Pat raised three sons: Sandy, Steve
and Scott. With the support and care of
his family, Bill found time for camping,
traveling and consulting. Until her death
in 2001, Pat was a major support in all
phases of his professional career.

In India, the most revered individuals in
society are the teachers who share their
knowledge to improve the lives of others.
This status can most certainly be applied
to Bill. It would be impossible to count
the number of people in our profession
that were taught and influenced by
Bill McConnell. He was a person who
gained and held the respect of countless
individuals due to his dedication and
caring attitude. Much of his consulting
work was done in manufacturing analysis,
assistance in product development,
process troubleshooting, in-house
training seminars and development
of processing specifications. He was
regularly asked to be an expert witness
and consultant to the legal fields on
plastics-related projects. Bill’s pioneering
contributions to the plastic industry
are well recognized. He was one of
the innovators in thermoforming and
plastic processing for the industrial and
aerospace industries.

In his early years in plastics, Bill
McConnell gained 14 years of invaluable
experience in thermoforming, injection
molding and blow molding as vicepresident
and General Manager of
Texstar Plastics, a custom processor
and thermoplastic sheet laminator.
Using his knowledge, he organized a

manufacturer’s representative business

dealing in plastic sheet, film and

equipment. After 20 years, he sold this
business to a long-time employee and
founded AAA Plastic Equipment, Inc.,
a manufacturer of shuttle and rotary
thermoforming equipment, where he
served as CEO and General Manager.
In 1966, AAA Plastic Equipment joined
the SPI. Bill was active on the Machinery
Division Safety Committee until 1976.

In 1960, Bill founded McConnell
Company, Inc., and served as President
and Owner until his death. What started
as a sales representative business
became internationally recognized as one
of the premier thermoforming consultant
companies in the world. Excelling in
offering technical advice and services,
Bill enjoyed bringing all of his experience
together to help companies succeed. His
associate partners will endeavor to carry
on his work and legacy.

Since his early career, Bill McConnell
has earned many awards. He received
the first annual “Thermoformer of the
Year” award from the Thermoforming
Division of the Society of Plastics
Engineers. He was also one of the 136
Fellows of the Society, out of 36,000
members. In 1997, he was honored

with a “Lifetime Achievement Award”
at the Thermoforming Conference and
also inducted into the Plastics Pioneers
Association that same year. He was

the first Thermoformer for this group.

Bill has been a member of SPE since
1953 and has served as an International
Membership Chairman, Education
Chairman and President of the North
Texas Section. He was one of the
founding members of this Division and
was a former chairman. Since 1972,
he conducted two-, three- and fourday
thermoforming seminars for the
SPE. Bill has also taught international
seminars in England (Rubber & Plastic
Institute), Belgium, Denmark, Australia,
South Africa, Canada, and Mexico. He
served on the Board of Directors of the
Thermoforming Division until his passing
this year.

As well as seminars and lectures, Bill
wrote many articles on all phases of
thermoforming, including contributions
to textbooks and publications including
the Modern Plastics Encyclopedia. He
wrote the thermoforming chapter for
the “Handbook of Plastic Materials and
Technology” by Irvin Rubin. His textbook,
“Thermoforming Technology,” is used
as the manual in his seminars. Bill also
created a special training course for
designers and engineers on what can and
cannot be done in thermoforming.

Anyone who has had the privilege of
meeting and learning from Bill McConnell
understands that his joy of people and
his dedication to helping them achieve
success was his goal in business and in
his personal life. He will be remembered
for many different attributes which include
his colorful airplane ties and for his
special motto “If you can’t measure it, you
can’t control it.”

Our thoughts and prayers are with Bill’s
family. His memory will continue to serve
as an inspiration for the many people that
knew him, and for those who will benefit
from his pioneering spirit. x

Lifetime Achievement Award

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 5

Thermoforming

Industry Practice

Quarterly®

Undercuts & Tooling Design for
Heavy-Gauge Thermoforming

Art Buckel, Associate Consultant, McConnell Co., Inc.

W
W
hen I first found vacuum forming in the late 1960s as a
way to manufacture plastic parts for my customer’s needs,
I was advised by the “old pro” that vacuum form molds were all
truncated pyramids or cones [see Illustration 1]. In other words,

Illustration #1.

parts with no pointy tops and very heavy draft on all sides. When I
suggested that it would be extremely difficult to sell these shapes
to all customers without considerable modifications, he agreed
and said “of course you can lengthen the parts, and widen them,
and use various different heights, and add rounded corners – but
always retain the original thought.”

My great pleasure of the last 40 years has been to design molds
for every conceivable market and application: parts with sides
with no draft or reverse draft; undercuts in one or more locations;
some that have undercuts around the entire base. However, I
have always retained that original thought: “Design the mold to
give the customer exactly what he needs while ensuring that the
formed part releases as easily as possible.” Put another way –
design for ease of manufacture.

In this article, we are going to look at a number of vacuum formed
and pressure formed parts with undercuts ranging from quite
simple to very complex and how the mold was designed to meet
the customer’s need.

Keeping it Simple

One of the simpler things to achieve in a vacuum formed part is
a handle on the front panel of a cabinet or a drawer front. You
should design the part with a scooped-out section as long as
you wish the handle to be, usually about 5-6″ in length, with the
hand-grab in the center [see Illustration 2]. With the profile of
the hand-grab flowing into the ends of the scooped area (where

Illustration #2.
the undercut section is a separate piece) the hot plastic material will
flow down into the recess, over the shape, and back up the other
side of the scoop. Since the loose section is hinged at the top edge
with a coil spring under the other edge, the loose section will rise at
the undercut edge when the cooled part begins to release from the
mold. It will then lift up until the formed part clears the overlaying
section. At this time the part is free of the mold and the handle
section snaps back into place ready for the next hot sheet to form.
With the proper design and fabrication of the mold, this action will
repeat thousands of times with little or no problems. It is perfect for
use on high volume production on a rotary machine.

Another good way to create an undercut handle is with a loose part
to create the hand-grab. This technique is typically for use on smaller
part quantities run on a single-station machine. For example, a
section of heavy-walled PVC or ABS pipe about one half inch in
diameter is used. Design the mold with the same scooped-out area
and a wall running the length of the cavity one half inch lower than
the face of the panel. At both ends of the cavity, build stops that
create areas that contain small steps on the sides for the pipe to butt
up against and to retain the pipe when it is inserted [see Illustration
3]. When the hot sheet forms over the pipe section it will create the
undercut hand-grabs and carry the loose part away.

Illustration 4 shows a mold for forming a display rack of greeting
cards with an undercut riser in the front to prevent the cards from
slipping out of their proper display space. The moving section of
the mold is a flat piece of aluminum stock with two pivot hinges
at the rear corners, and a return spring under the part. As the hand
in the photo shows, when the formed sheet is cooled and begins to

6 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Illustration #3.

Illustration #4.

release from the mold, the undercut section lifts the flap until it is
clear. The mold section then snaps back into place, ready for the
next hot sheet. This mold is about 45″ x 27″ with many hinged
sections.

Some undercuts shown in preliminary drawings of the required
plastic part appear to be a real problem as the part design does
not lend itself to a moving section in the mold [see Illustration 5].
On the right edge of the part is a severe undercut. For the mold

Illustration #5.

design solution [see Illustration 6], where the mold platen surface
is separate from the platen box, there are two pins in the walls of
the box which create two pivot points. Note that the pivot points
are not in the center of the mold. The platen surface rests on a ledge
inside the platen box, on the undercut side only. When the hot sheet

Illustration #6.

has formed and cooled it begins to dismount the mold, lifting the
undercut end of the mold until it clears the undercut allowing the
mold to drop back to its forming position ready for the next hot
sheet.

Products that have been in great demand for a number of years
are “work in process containers” that will stack using projecting
sections on the outside of the containers [see Illustration 7].

Illustration #7.

A two-up mold to form this type of product is shown with the
moving sections along both sides and around the corners onto
the ends, which are made up of four sections. At the bottom of
the molds are steps that form a “step surface” inside the plastic
part where the projecting section can rest and be contained on the
sides for good stacking. The design of the four moving sections
is achieved by using pivot pins at the extreme ends of the short
sections. When the ends of the long side sections are pulled into
the mold, they cause the loose sections to move entirely within
the mold [see Illustration 8 on page 10] allowing the formed
and cooled material to dismount the mold. The movement of the
sections can be induced by pneumatic or hydraulic cylinders or
electric motors, pushing and pulling the sections.

TPO Front Facia Example

The next part we will examine is a TPO front facia required by
the French auto manufacturer Renault for limited production in
South America. Because the part swept around the complete front
of the auto, and then turned in at the front wheel openings on both
sides, it created a severe undercut at each end of the mold. There
were two important customer requirements that were critical to
this project:

(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 7

Illustration #8.

1.
Absolutely no mark on the outside indicating any separate
mold sections.
2.
Uniform material thickness over the entire plastic part.
The design answer was to build loose undercut parts that would
slide up inclined ramps on the main body of the mold [see
Illustration 9]. However, the most important requirement of the

Illustration #9.

mold design was to guarantee the “no mold mark” on the finished
parts over large production runs. An additional challenge was
how to get the two heavy moving sections easily up the slide until
the plastic part was freed, and then how to “gently” get the mold
sections back down the ramp without slamming the bottom rests.

Achieving the “No Mark” Requirement

The two end sections were cast of aluminum as was the main
body of the mold. They had cooling lines cast in them, connected
to the lines in the main body of the mold with flexible woven steel
tubes [see Illustration 10]. It was important that the aluminum
behind the bronze plates, on which the two moving sections slid,
were temperature-controlled with cooling lines. (Author’s Note:
NEVER build a mold with sliding sections moving on similar
metals. They will cause galling of the aluminum surfaces and
metal pieces will come off of the contact area, which will soon
lead to binding.)

Notice in Illustration 10 how the two guides are built in to control
the positioning of the sliding part. Also, the pivoting lock in the
center of the bronze plate that secures the end section when it is
down in the forming position is turned by an electric motor: one
direction to lock, and reverse to unlock when the part is formed
and cooled. It is critical to remember not to use the hollow of the

Illustration #10.

mold as a vacuum chamber! When the vacuum comes on, and the
ambient air pushes the hot sheet onto the mold, it will tend to move
any loose part no matter how tightly it is locked in place, because
there is no equal pressure pushing back.

When designing a mold with loose sections that must not leave
a mark, you will be amazed at how well it will work if you run a
vacuum manifold through the mold and run flexible tubes from the
manifold to the inside surface of the mold at all of the vacuum holes.
During forming, the inside of the mold has the same ambulant air
pressure as the room in which it is being formed and the inside of
the mold is pushing back against the pressure caused by the vacuum
forming of the sheet. Thus the loose section will not move during
the vacuum forming period.

To handle the weight of the two moving end sections, each one has a
steel cable fastened to it that runs through a hole in the bronze plate,
over a pulley, and is secured to a counterweight within the body of
the mold. The counterweight hangs in a tube, and as the part begins
to dismount the mold, the ends moved up the slides quite easily
due to the falling weight inside the mold. When the formed plastic
part undercuts have cleared the moving mold sections, they slide
down the ramps slowly due to the resistance of the weights. Each
counterweight reduces the sliding section of the mold from a true
34 pounds to a lifting and falling weight of only 4 pounds.

What is probably the most common undercut in today’s
thermoforming industry is the pressure formed housing with a
return at the base (either partial or completely around the base.)
Since the pressure formed housing is formed into a cavity mold, the
return is formed with an over-hanging aluminum section at the top
of the mold [see Illustration 11 – the brown section at the bottom of
the mold is a piece of a formed part that protects the molds textured
surface when it is not in use].

I have selected this particular example because of the complexity
of the total design, Notice the severity of the undercuts in the four
corners, each more than 1″ deep [see Illustration 12]. In order to
form these corners with adequate material thickness, I designed
four articulating pushers in the corners of the plug. These pushers
were pieces of aluminum stock with wooden shapes on the forming
ends. The aluminum was shaped to fit into the plug where it had a
pivot point, and the other end extended out of the side of the plug
where it rested on the top surface of the hot sheet as the plug pushed
the material down into the cavity of the mold [see Illustration 13

8 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Illustration #11.

Illustration #12.

Illustration #13.

showing fingers pushing the extended ends of two of the pushers,

which cause the wooden sections to move out into the undercut
section of the mold]. As the plug moves down into the bottom of
the mold, the hot forming sheet laying over the top of the overcut
sections of the mold, pushes the aluminum ends up and into the
plug, pivoting the pushers out and pushing the hot sheet back into
the deep corners. This design produced large quantities of pressure
formed parts.

There are a number of ways to design this overhang in the cavity
mold that produces the undercut. The first and simplest way is
to use one or more loose tooling sections that fit into a special
opening at the mold’s upper edge and come out in the formed
plastic part, as shown in the previous example. The loose parts
are then removed from the formed part, and placed back on
the mold while the next sheet is heating. With 2 or more loose
sections on adjoining sides, the corners will usually meet at 45%
angles.

Other ways to move the over-hanging mold sections away from
the main mold cavity during part removal include:

1.
Hinge the loose sections at the rear lower edge, so that the
sections swivel up and back as the part dismounts the mold
until it clears the undercut area of the plastic parts which
then drop back into the forming position.
2.
Move the loose sections horizontally back into the mold
body to clear the formed plastic part during its removal
from the mold. Then move the loose sections back into the
forming position.
3.
The movement of the mold sections can be caused by the
use of pneumatic or hydraulic cylinders, or electric motors.
A ring gear and pinion is often used to move large, heavy
sections.
This article is offered to not only assure the readers that you can
create molds with undercuts, but also to emphasize that it is most
important to create good designs of the critical mold sections.
It is always a good idea to cut out a cardboard of the moving
section, to scale, and pin it over the drawing to proof the design
and determine that there is no interference. x

SPE Veteran Recognized
by Western Plastics Pioneers

Art Buckel was recently recognized by the Western
Plastics Pioneers Association and was conferred with their
Hall of Fame Award for his outstanding achievements to
the plastics industry.

The objectives of the Plastics Pioneers Association shall be

to recognize achievement in the field of plastics/polymer

science, engineering, technology and management; to
support industry-wide educational programs; and to
promote the study and improvement of plastics, science
engineering and technology.

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 9

Thermoforming
Quarterly®

Industry Practice

Texture in the Digital Age

Chris Spellman, Sales Engineer, Mold-Tech, Carol Stream, IL

T
T
he process of texturing molds has always been
recognized as an artistic and as a craft-based
process. A look inside the texturing process will
reveal the technician applying his tools using the
smallest of fine-tip paintbrushes and X-acto knives,
all being done under the highest magnification
possible. As mold-making has moved squarely into
the CAD/CAM world, texturing, like mold polishing,
has remained an art form. While this remains true
today, there are new technical developments that are
having a significant impact on quality and cost.

Texturing is achieved through a controlled
corrosion process. Areas of the mold that are not
to be textured are protected with tapes, paints, and
waxes. These are also called “resists” as they prevent
the etchant from etching the mold. Once the areas of
the mold to be textured are defined by the masking
process, the next step is to apply the pattern resist to
the mold surface. In most cases this pattern is a wax
resist and it has the appearance of a leather grain or
a wood grain. These patterns have traditionally been
achieved by producing a master plate that allows the
wax pattern to transfer from the plate onto a tissue
paper or transfer sheet. The transfer sheet is then
“wallpapered” on to the mold surface.

The master plate process has some limitations, the
first of which is size. Current uses are limited to 24″ x
36″ which requires that multiple sheets of wallpaper
be patched on larger areas. The seams between these
sheets require skillful and detailed hand work to make
a seamless transition. This is very time consuming
and results are based on the technician’s skill, the
time allotted to the task and the ability of the touchup
resist to last through the etching process.

This is an area where MoldTech has advanced
into the digital age. New digital transfer technology
can produce pattern sheets that are 48″ x 72″, giving
the mold surface a seamless pattern. This eliminates
time and the possible breakdown of the hand-painted

seams. The result is greater efficiency, lower costs, less

risk, and a more consistent pattern application.

Digital Transfer Technology also allows for rapid
pattern development capabilities. Whether creating
new patterns or manipulating existing patterns, Digital
Transfer Technology has greatly reduced the task time,
while the design options have exploded. Brand new
options include new “morphing” textures, where one
texture pattern can blend into another with seamless
transition. Geometric patterns, like a diamond grid,
can now morph into a leather pattern. Traditionally,
there have been break lines between grains of different
styles. These are no longer required. Additional
advances include the ability to take the file of a specific
mold surface and design a grain to conform to the
contours of that surface. This can result in a texture
that changes or morphs from one pattern to another
along the contour or profile change on a mold surface.
Geometric textures (those that have patterns laid out
in rows) can also be developed to “wrap” the complex
curves of a tool surface. This is another advance
that saves time, lowers costs and reduces risk while
reducing manual touch-ups as well as eliminating
distortion that can occur with geometric patterns
on complex curves. Given the new popularity of
geometric textures, this new technology is producing
results never before seen.

Another design advantage of the digital process
is the ability to incorporate corporate logos into the
texture. By taking the artwork of a company logo and
developing a texture pattern that includes it, textures
can now be created that are both decorative and that
reinforce brand identification.

The chemistry used to etch these patterns into
machined and cast aluminum molds is another area
of development. The texturing industry has for years
strived to produce the sharp, well-defined grain
profiles that were available with steel tooling. Recent
breakthroughs have produced an aluminum etchant
that does now provide texture profiles similar to those
achieved in steel.

10 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Figure 1: Example of textured logo to enhance brand.

Textured surfaces often include the design intent of gloss management.
This is best achieved with sharper texture profiles. Lower gloss matte
finishes and stipples, more realistic looking woodgrains, and leather grains
that display natural creases, wrinkles, and pore patterns all benefit from a
sharper etch profile. This new chemistry also has the advantage of better
texture depth control and enhanced repair results. High appearance parts
that previously required injection molding from steel tooling may now be
considered for thermoformed parts.

x

PROSPECTIVE
AUTHORS

Thermoforming Quarterly® is an

“equal opportunity” publisher!

You will notice that we have several departments and

feature articles. If you have a technical article or other

articles you would like to submit, please send to

Conor Carlin, Editor. Please send in .doc format.

all graphs and photos should be of sufficient size and

contrast to provide a sharp printed image.

Why
Join?

It has never been more
important to be a member
of your professional
society than now, in
the current climate of
change and volatility
in the plastics industry.
Now, more than ever,
the information you
access and the personal
networks you create can
and will directly impact
your future and your
career.

Active membership in
SPE – keeps you current,
keeps you informed, and
keeps you connected.

The question really isn’t
“why join?” but …

Why
Not?

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 11

Thermoforming

The Art of Thermoforming

Quarterly®

Eddyline Kayak

Tom Derrer, Eddyline Kayak [Editor’s Note: We wish to thank Tom Derrer of Eddyline Kayak for contributing

this highly original piece to Thermoforming QuarTerly. It is just another example

of how thermoforming as a process is being used in new, innovative ways.]

T
T
he City of Bend, Oregon and several other local area businesses sponsor an “Art in the Park” program.
Each year they solicit entries from numerous artists for project ideas. They have a selection board made up
of commissioners and citizens and they make a selection which is funded by the city and sponsors. This year,
Troy Pillow (www.pillowstudios.com), a Seattle artist, submitted a proposal and rendering of the kayak “flower”
sculpture. It was voted in unanimously by the group. Troy then researched various kayak manufacturers and methods
of construction and approached Eddyline. After several meetings discussing the merits of various materials and
looking at different kayaks, Troy decided to use our Merlin LT model. Eddyline put nine boats and nine paddles
into production to meet his needs, three of each color: red, orange and yellow. The paddles (the stamen of the
flowers) are all black. Troy had engineering help to design the structure, which he says has been tested to winds of
85 mph. It was erected on May 5th and 6th, 2010.

Tom Derrer and his wife, Lisa, photographed
beside the sculpture in Bend, OR.
Close-up of the ”stem” of the kayak
structure.
12 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 13

Thermoforming
Quarterly®

The Business of Thermoforming

Thermoforming Optimization: Improving Process

Efficiency and Lowering Energy Consumption

William Karszes, PhD, OCTAL, Roswell, GA
Mohammed Razeem, OCTAL, Dallas, TX
Jerome Romkey, GN, Chester, Novia Scotia

SUMMARY

This paper was written to explore
the effects of material and machine
choice on the thermoforming process.
The data and findings related to
production costs, energy consumption
and process optimization. Within this
paper we explore two different types
of machines. One is distinguished
by the heating of the plastic by
conduction of heat into the plastic
from a heated platen. This process
is defined as contact heat method
(GN-DX series). The second process
is where the heat is introduced into
the sheet by electromagnetic waves
or radiant heat called the radiant heat
method. The source of the radiant heat
may be varied and the control scheme
is varied between the two processes.
GN machines are based on the contact
heat method. This paper will not
go into the technical details of each
process, but is written to compare the
economics of the two processes. Also
within this study we examine the
effects of a specific material DPET™
(OCTAL) on the economics of the
process.

INTRODUCTION

A new-patented process has been
developed by OCTAL Petrochemical
to produce APET sheet. The new
process has been created to produce
a new sheet specifically for the
thermoformer. The new product trade
named DPET™ was tested in GN

[Editor’s Note: We are grateful to the authors for providing such a comprehensive
article that includes cost and energy savings models. We believe it is important
to point out that the models and subsequent data are presented in Thermoforming
QuarTerly as illustrative examples of how processors might examine their own
operational performance. Equipment type and processing parameters will vary across

the industry.]

laboratories in Chester, Nova Scotia.

The material was tested against RPET

and regular APET. The purpose of
the tests was to develop a cycle that
produced a well-formed part of like
clarity. During experiments a new
GN machine was also tested (GN’s

DX series). The test results showed
DPET™ had a faster cycle time, was
more efficient and could be run with

lower clamping pressure.

OCTAL and GN have developed
costing models for thermoformed trays.
The two models are presented and
compared. The models are then used
to show savings to the thermoformer
when using DPET™ and GN machines.
It is important to note that the material
thickness and part design chosen for
this study reflect a process that did not
require a plug-assist.

Based on the costing models up to
24% bottom line savings can be added
to thermoformers using the new DX
machine and DPET™. The cost models
allow the processor to explore their
own possible saving. Both models lead
to the same answers. The GN model
allows one to investigate processing
cost, investment cost and return on
investment. The most important finding
of the model is that 50% less waste on
GN thermoformer can lower customer
total production cost by approximate
12%. The study shows that investment
costs plus return on investment is
important but not so much as the waste.
The OCTAL model treats only the
processing cost.

Furthermore, thermoformers’ customers
are demanding cost containment
while requiring more environmentally
friendly products. Thermoformers need
to have new innovative technologies not
only to contain cost but also to reduce
their carbon footprint as legislature
points to tougher standards. OCTAL
commissioned PIRA (Printing Industry
Research Association) to conduct a
streamlined comparison of carbon
footprint of DPET™ against APET
and RPET. The results of the study are
shown in Table 1 below.

APET
MATERIAL
4.173 Kg
CARBON DIOXIDE EQUIVALENCE
DPET 3.023 Kg
RPET 3.015 Kg

Table 1. Carbon Footprint.

As per study conducted by PIRA for OCTAL;
DPETTM has a carbon footprint 27.6% lower
than APET and only 0.2% higher than 50%

RPET.

When compared to APET and RPET,
DPET™ has a carbon footprint 27.6%
lower than APET and only 0.2% higher
than 50% RPET (50% RPET+50%
APET) assuming that no energy is
carried on from the post consumer
waste.

EXPERIMENTAL
PROCEDURE

Rolls of APET, RPET and DPET™
were tested in the GN laboratory.
All materials were 16 mil (or 400
microns) (nominal). The material was
formed into trays with a four to one

14 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

draw ratio. A six-cavity mold was
used. The criterion was to develop a

DPET™ cycle time and then optimize

the cycle. The criteria were both the
relative clarity and formation of the
part. A panel of three judged relative
clarity and, formation was judged by a
trained GN technician.

DPET™ was first trialed using the
standard APET cycle time. Preheats
and cycle time were then adjusted to
optimize the cycle time. The clarity
and formation of parts were ranked at
each change. Once an optimum cycle
was obtained the recipe was noted. In
this trial the formation of the part was
always good however; the loss of clarity
was noted if the temperature/time was
pushed beyond optimum. The surface
temperature was then measured using
temperature strips. The temperature
was noted to be approximately 100oC.
The cycle time for DPET™ was noted

to be 4.08 seconds.
Once optimization was obtained, a

10-minute trial of DPET™ was run.

The material ran without any trouble
over this period of time. The machine
was left idle for over an hour and the

DPET™ cycle was run again. The

machine produced good parts on the
second cycle and again had no trouble
during the 10-minute run time. As a
further test for reproducibility a second

roll of DPET™ was mounted on the

machine from a different cycle in the

same production lot of DPET™. Again

the material produced good parts on
the second cycle and performed well
throughout the cycle test.

As a final trial, the original DPET™
roll was remounted on the machine;
the trial was run to determine how
fast DPET™ could be run. The cycle
time was reduced to 3.32 seconds with
good parts being formed.

RPET was then mounted on the
machine. The first trial was run at
the DPET™ settings. The resultant
parts were well formed, but showed
significant haze. The cycle time and
temperatures were adjusted to obtain
the clearest parts. The clearest parts
were obtained when the preheat

temperature was reduced and the
dwell increased. The overall optimum

cycle time for RPET was determined

to be 4.43 seconds. The surface
temperature was tested and found to
be approximately 96oC. The results of

this test showed RPET did not adsorb
heat as fast as DPET™ and retain

clarity.

APET was mounted on the machine
and optimized per the same procedure
as outlined. The results were a cycle
time of 4.42 seconds for APET. Again
the trial shows APET did not adsorb
heat as fast as DPET™ and retain

clarity.
Other trials at GN had been run using

20 mil DPET™ and the results were
essentially the same with DPET™
running faster than either RPET or

APET. The average cycle time will

vary with gauge and part configuration.
DPET™ runs consistently 10% faster
than the APET and RPET.

Afield trial was run at a commercial
thermoformer on a GN machine.
After starting with the standard cycle
time, we then increased the cycle time
by over 10%. The cycle time was not
running at standard at the time of the
trial. At the end of the trial we had
decreased the cycle time greater than
the 10% over standard. The check of
the surface temperature at optimum
showed a value of between 98oC. and
100oC.

COST MODELS

Two cost models were developed,
one by GN and the other by OCTAL.
The two models basically present the
same results.

The aim of this model is to compare
three different materials APET,
DPET™ and RPET on GN machines
(contact) versus radiant machines.
Table 2 represents variables that are
common to all materials.

SPECIFIC WEIGHT 1.35 1.35 g/cm3
SHEET PRICE 1.63 1.63 $/Kg
SCRAP PRICE 0.38 0.38 $/Kg
% SKELETAL WASTE AND SCRAP 11 256.8 %
ENERGY CONSUMPTION (GN) 6.8 70 KW/machine
NUMBER OF CAVITIES PER TOOL 10 2000000 N/A
ORDER SIZE 2000000 19.20 N/A
COST OF LABOR 19.20 0.128 $/Hr
ELECTRICITY 0.128 $/KwHr

Table 2. Variables Common to All Materials.

Table represents variables that are used to run the cost model. The above variables are used for the

example model in this article.

The user has to enter a certain set of
data to run the model as shown in Table
3 on the following page. To show an
example of how the model works, we
have taken a case of 2,000,000 trays
(252 x 110 mm or 10″ x 4.33″) at 250
microns (APET sheet) and a total of 10
trays per cycle. Earlier tests show that
APET runs at 13.51 cycles per minute.
The cycles per minute of other materials
are calculated based on test results at
GN labs. The user can opt to run the
model either on contact machine (GN)
or radiant machine. For this example,
we opted for contact heat. Based on

the type of machine, the scrap plus
waste and energy consumption will
change. For contact heat, the skeletal
waste and scrap is calculated to be
11% (25% for radiant machines)
energy consumption is rated at 6.8

KW (70 KW for radiant machines).

The model is based on two contact
machines versus one radiant machine
in order to level the throughput of
machines for comparison. Other data
that need to be entered by the user
include cost of labor, cost of raw

(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 15

250
13.51
10
8%
252
110
CONTACT
11%
5%
5%
0%
$ 19.20
$ 1.63
$ 1.63
$ 0.38
$ 0.38
$ 0.38
250
13.51
10
8%
252
110
CONTACT
11%
5%
5%
0%
$ 19.20
$ 1.63
$ 1.63
$ 0.38
$ 0.38
$ 0.38
material, cost of scrap and cost of

After entering the data in the input

electricity per Kwh.

fields the model gives an output based

NUMBER OF TRAYS 2,000,000
GAUGE REQUIRED BY CUSTOMER IN MICRONS

CYCLES PER MINUTE (APET)
TRAYS PER CYCLE

DOWNGAUGING AND EFFICIENCY (OPTIONAL)
LENGTH OF TRAY (mm)

WIDTH OF TRAY (mm)
ENTER TYPE OF MACHINE “RADIANT” OR “CONTACT”

SKELETAL WASTE AND SCRAP BEFORE ACTUAL PRODUCTION IN %
ADDITIONAL PROCESS WASTE FOR APET (OPTIONAL)

ADDITIONAL PROCESS WASTE FOR RPET (OPTIONAL)
ADDITIONAL PROCESS WASTE FOR DPET™ (OPTIONAL)

LABOR PER HOUR
COST OF RAW MATERIAL PER KILO APET

COST OF RAW MATERIAL PER KILO RPET
COST OF RAW MATERIAL PER KILO DPET™

COST OF SCRAP APET
COST OF SCRAP RPET

COST OF SCRAP DPET™
ENERGY CONSUMPTION (KW)
$ 0.38
6.8
COST OF ELECTRICITY PER (Kwh) $ 1,128
Table 3. Input table for sample model.

VARIABLE
CHANGES WITH CHOICE OF MACHINE

Screenshot of the model input page, where the user feeds in the variables to run the model.

If the same model is run for radiant heat

on the type of machine opted. (Results

the results are as shown in Table 5.

for this example are shown in Table

4.)

Contact APET Contact DPET™ Contact rPET
TOTAL PRODUCTION HOURS 123.37 113.38 127.74
COST OF LABOR $ 2,369 $ 2,177 $ 2,337
COST OF MATERIAL $ 35,885 $ 31,442 $ 35,885
COST OF ELECTRICITY $ 215 $ 197 $ 212
TOTAL COST $ 38,468 $ 33,816 $ 38,434
TOTAL COST MINUS SCRAP VALUE $ 37,580 $ 32,999 $ 37,456

Table 4. Output of model with contact machine.

RADIANT APET RADIANT DPET™ RADIANT rPET
TOTAL PRODUCTION HOURS 108.22 99.46 106.79
COST OF LABOR $ 2,078 $ 1, 910 $ 2,050
COST OF MATERIAL $ 42,583 $ 37,311 $ 42,583
COST OF ELECTRICITY $ 970 $ 891 $ 957
TOTAL COST $ 44,863 $ 40 $ 45,591
TOTAL COST MINUS SCRAP VALUE $ 43,236 $ 37,909 $ 43,195

Table 5. Output table for sample model.

Screenshot of the output for the model based on the type of machine opted and variables used in the
sample model input page.

RESULTS

This study is based on models
created by GN for their thermoforming
machine (DX Series) and OCTAL for
their DPET™ sheet. These models
compare GN’s contact technology
machines versus European radiant heat
technology.

DPET™ is manufactured to a caliper
tolerance of ± 1%. This tight tolerance
leads to savings as thinner gauges can
be specified (as shown in Figure 1 on
the following page). Additionally, it was
estimated that tighter caliper leads to 3%
higher efficiency during forming (based
on previous studies where part thickness
was measured as a function of starting
thickness) and 5% less process waste
(based on roll-to-roll changeover and
machine restart).

Running the cost model we know

that the weight of one 252 x 110mm

(10″ x 4.33″) APET tray weighs 9.355g
whereas the same tray in DPET™ weighs
8.607g. Thus the ± 1% tight tolerance

helps to reduce the weight of the formed
part by about 9%. The tight tolerance
enables uniform heating and cooling
of sheet during forming, resulting in
faster throughput, reducing process

waste, increased efficiency and reduced
production hours. Reducing production

hours (Figure 2 on the following page)
reduces cost of labor by about 9%.

Graph comparing DPET™, APET AND
RPET on the GN machine is shown in

Figure 3 on the following page.

Due to the smaller size and lower
throughput of a single GN machine,
to balance the equation we have used
two GN machines versus one radiant
machine in the model. The cost of
two GN thermoformers is usually
comparable to the cost of one European
radiant thermoformer. Tooling for GN
machines is 25% – 50% lower than
radiant machines as shown in Figure 3
on the following page.

The cycle times for DPET™, APET
and RPET are 4.08cpm, 4.42cpm and
4.43cpm respectively. This means that
DPET™ runs 8% faster than APET and
7% faster than RPET as seen in Figure 4
shown on page 18.

16 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Competitive Product

Figure 1. Schematic of Caliper Control of ± 1% for DPET™.

Cost Comparison APET, RPET & DPET™

$ 4,581
12.19%

Figure 3. Tooling Cost GN Vs. Radiant.

This combination produces about 63%

Radiant heat machines produce

less scrap/waste and reduces cost of

an average of 6200kg (13640 lbs.)

electricity by 78% when compared to

of scrap whereas the contact heat

radiant machines. This will reduce the

machine running DPET™ produces

cost of raw materials to about 16% as

only 2,299kg (5058 lbs.) of scrap.

seen in Figure 5 shown on page 18.
On running the cost models we see
that there is a cost savings of $4,585

when using DPET™ vs. RPET and

savings of $4,551 when comparing

DPET™ to APET on the GN contact

heat machines. This implies an
approximate 12% reduction in the
cost of production. Comparing the
contact heat machine with the radiant
machine, there is a total savings of
about 13%. A cost savings of $10,240

is achieved when running DPET™ on

the GN machines vs. APET on radiant
machine, and a savings of $10,200

when compared to RPET on a radiant

machine. A total savings of 24% is
achieved as seen in Figure 6 on page

18.
ENERGY CONSUMPTION

The GN DX machines use 6.8 KWs

to run. In the model, radiant units use

70 KWs to run (based on survey of
machines comparable to GN 30″ x
21″ forming area). Using the models
we find the following comparisons

shown on page 18.
In summary, the use of GN’s

machine and OCTAL’s DPET™

was found to lower the amount of
energy used in the thermoforming
process. Thus, the combination of
these two new technologies resulted

in significant savings potential for

the thermoformers in both production
costs and energy consumption. x

See

Figure 4,

Figure 5,

Figure 6,

Table 2,

Figure 7,

& Figure 8

on the

following pages.

(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 17

Figure 4. Savings-Cycles per Minute.

Figure indicates that DPET™ runs 8% faster than APET and 7% faster than RPET.

Figure 5. Savings-Electricity & Raw Materials.

Figure 6. % Savings-Total Cost using DEPT™.

A total savings of 24% is achieved when running DPET™ on GN machine
versus APET or RPET on radiant machine.

18 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Table 2. Energy Consumption.

Comparing energy consumption when running APET and DPET™ on GN machines vs. radiant machines. The data

above is for two GN machines and one radiant machine. This is to match the throughput of both the machines.

Figure 7. Cycle Time Comparison.

Comparing cycle times for DPET™, APET and RPET on GN’s DX machine.

(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 19

Figure 8. Production Hours.

Comparing production hours when running DPET™, APET and RPET on GN machines.

For further information or to obtain copies of cost models,

please contact:
Mohammed Razeem
mrazeem@OCTAL.com
or

Jerome Romkey
marketing@gnplastics.com

REDUCE! REUSE!
RECYCLE!

REDUCE! REUSE!
RECYCLE!

20 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Roger Kipp
Councilor

Council Communications

The Spring 2010 Governance Meetings
for the Society of Plastics Engineers
were held prior to ANTEC in Orlando,
FL from May 14th through May 16th.
As Councilor, I represented the Division
by attending the SPE Foundation Board,
the Corporate Outreach Committee,
the Strategic Planning Committee, the
Divisions Committee, and all Council
Meetings.

The Society, like many companies
and trade organizations, is focused on
continuous improvement through wellplanned
change. The goal is to create a

more efficient Council with increased
member value, organizational flexibility

and global growth.

This is a global Society striving to
bring quality information and technical
content about plastics to members
around the world. There is no one

size-fits-all value proposition. The

Society needs to provide a customized
product to the membership. This need is
evidenced by the current bombardment
of SPE emails we all receive. This
issue is concerning yet in many ways
effective. Customization or an “a la
carte” platform will give members an
opportunity to pick their preference.
The Strategic Planning Committee is
currently working on such a platform
with plans for presentation to Council at
the Fall meeting.

There is a membership goal of 16,000
for year end 2010 with membership

at the end of April at 14,700. The first
quarter saw 750 new members join the

COUNCIL SUMMARY ®
Society. Allowing for a 15% annual
membership drop as we experienced in
2009, continuing at that level of new
membership for the remaining eight
months would get us there. Direct mail
followed closely by email remain the
most effective sources for membership
recruitment and retention.

Financially, SPE ran a modest positive

bottom line through the first four

months. The savings generated from
well-planned cutbacks orchestrated by
the Executive Director along with the
slight upward movement in membership

revenue has given SPE that positive first

quarter. E-Live Webinars and the new
online resource directory are performing
well and provide great member value.

A new website has been introduced
for Plastics Engineering at www.
plasticsengineering.org. This website
is fully integrated with www.4SPE.
org and is a showcase for more
“commercial” content including new
pages for the online technical library
and the consultants circle.

Our Thermoforming Division was
acknowledged for our contribution as
gold sponsors to the ANTEC Student
Activities Program. In addition, the
Thermoforming Division received
the Pinnacle Award for outstanding
Division achievement presented at the
leadership awards luncheon. With 5%
of SPE membership represented by
students and another 5% under the age
of 35, this continues to be a worthwhile
Division investment.

The Thermoforming Division and the
European Thermoforming Division
can be proud of our continuing impact
and overall support of the SPE goal
to promote the education, promotion
and technical advancement of plastic
processing throughout the world. If you
have questions or input for Council,
please contact me directly. x

Roger Kipp

rkipp@mcclarinplastics.com

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 21

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CPT serves a wide range of industries including:
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252-448-9900
sales@colorpathtechnologies.comwww.colorpathtechnologies.com

22 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Need help
with your

REDUCE! REUSE! RECYCLE!

technical school
or college
expenses?

I
I
f you or someone you know is
working towards a career in
the plastic industry, let the SPE
Thermoforming Division help support
those education goals.

Within this past year alone, our
organization has awarded multiple
scholarships! Get involved and take
advantage of available support from
your plastic industry!

Here is a partial list of schools
and colleges whose students have
benefited from the Thermoforming
Division Scholarship Program:

• UMASS Lowell
• San Jose State
• Pittsburg State
• Penn State Erie
• University of Wisconsin
• Michigan State
• Ferris State
• Madison Technical College
• Clemson University
• Illinois State
• Penn College
Start by completing the application
forms at www.thermoformingdivision.
com or at www.4spe.com. x

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 23

THERMOFORMING DIVISION SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS2010 THERMOFORMING DIVISION SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS2010
Segen Griep
Memorial
Scholarship

ADAM W. MIX is the recipient
of the $5,000 Thermoforming
Division/Segen Griep Memorial
Scholarship. He attends the
University of Wisconsin-Madison
where he is a graduate student
in the College of Engineering,
working on his M.S. and Ph.D.
in Mechanical Engineering. He
obtained his B.S. in Chemical
Engineering, with a minor in
polymer science, from Michigan
Technological University.

As a graduate Research Assistant

at UW-Madison, Adam conducts
research with Professor A.
Jeffrey Giacomin as part of the
requirements for his M.S. and
Ph.D. His research focus is on
polymers, rheology of polymer
melts, and plastics processing,

specifically those common

in thermoforming. He works
with Plastic Ingenuity, a local
thermoforming company, to
help them understand and solve
their thermoforming problems.
He helped them solve a coatings
problem on their PET line,
developing a method to determine

Youngs modulus from a durometer.
Once that problem was solved, a
different type of surface quality
problem was observed, so Adam
worked with the process engineers
to develop a sag experiment
using a laboratory thermoformer
and video camera to record
the sag over time. He and the
engineers are now looking at the
rheological properties of the resins
to determine if they can detect
the problems before processing
bad sheet. His paper on sag in
thermoforming has been accepted
for publication in a refereed
journal.

Adam is active in the SPE Student
Chapter at UW-Madison, serving
as Vice President in 2008-09 and
as President in 2009-10. He gave
a presentation on Dimensionless
Durometry to the Society of

Rheology Conference in 2009.

Adam also volunteered at the 9th
Annual International Polymer
Colloquium 2009 where he ran the
registration desk and at the Second
Harvest Foodbank of Southern
Wisconsin. x

Thermoforming
Division Memorial
Scholarship

CLINTON L. REGES is
the recipient of the $2,500
Thermoforming Division Memorial
Scholarship. He attends East
Carolina University, where he is
a Senior working on his B.S. in
Engineering.

A high school honor society
member and athlete (wrestling,

football, track & field), Clinton

serves as a volunteer wrestling
coach on both the middle school

and high school level. He also
works as the assistant junior
varsity/varsity football coach for
the Pitt County Schools. When
assigned a research paper as part
of his sophomore materials and
processing class at East Carolina
University, he chose to research
football helmets. It was this
research that really opened his

eyes to the field of polymers and

plastics.

Clinton currently works for CMI
Plastics in Ayden, NC, where he
works as a production assistant,
helping to design and build tooling,
and helping with thermoforming
set-ups. He also works with the
quality manager at CMI, learning
to read customer specs and then
implement them. He also has
experience culling through parts
to determine the point of origin
for rejects. This job has expanded
Clinton’s knowledge of plastics to
the point that he has determined
that thermoforming is where his
career will take him. Along with
his passion for sports, he hopes
that, one day, he will be working in

the field of sports equipment.

x

24 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS
PTi Memorial
Scholarship

JEROME FISHER is the
recipient of the $2,000 SPE
Thermoforming Division
Scholarship, sponsored by PTi of
Aurora, IL.

While attending Oakland

University, in Rochester Hills,

MI, Jerome held a full-time
internship with Faurecia Interior
Systems. For the past two and a
half years, he has worked for the
France-based Tier 1 automotive

supplier within the Research &

Innovation group where the focus
is on sustainability, creativity, and

HYTAC ®

the exploration of new materials
and processes. Jerome has both
led and participated in several
projects, including processes from
male/female vacuum forming
to cut & sew and injection
molding. Materials used include
polypropylene foils and urethane
foams. Jerome plans to pursue a

future in the field after graduation

as his interest continues to grow
through the knowledge he has
gained both in the classroom
and in hands-on experience with
plastics manufacturing.

Jerome is part of the Oakland
University Formula SAE team
where he serves as the Marketing
Manager. Formula SAE is a
competition to design, build, and
compete against international
teams with a Formula-style
racecar. Aside from school,
internship, and Formula SAE
interests, Jerome has also designed
and built a motorcycle enginepowered,
street-legal, two-seater
formula style car for road driving,
as well as at local autocross and
track day events. x

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TEL (508) 226-3901 FAX (508) 226-3902

Innovative Tooling Materials for Thermoforming

Visit Our
Website at:
www.thermoformingdivision.com
Our mission is
to facilitate the
advancement of
thermoforming
technologies
through
education,
application,
promotion and
research.
SPE National
Executive Director
Susan Oderwald
Direct Line: 203/740-5471
Fax: 203/775-8490
email: Seoderwald@4spe.org
Conference Coordinator
Gwen Mathis
6 S. Second Street, SE
Lindale, Georgia 30147
706/235-9298
Fax: 706/295-4276
email: gmathis224@aol.com
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 25

26 Thermoforming QUArTerLY
UNIVERSITY NEWS
Letter from Los Angeles
Juliet Oehler Goff, President/CEO, Kal Plastics
Irecently had the pleasure of visiting UCLA Architecture and Urban Design to meet the thermoforming team who are currently
using a MAAC thermoformer made possible by the SPE Thermoforming Division matching grant program. The machine was
installed in the summer of 2008.
They are actively using the machine a great deal and they expressed their gratitude for the SPE grant program. I saw photos
of some of the work generated and encouraged them to submit parts for the competition at the next conference.
I also asked to get annual updates on the output by the students and copies of student reports and/or any technical papers that
could be published in Thermoforming Quarterly and possibly presented at future conferences. I will re-connect with the teaching
faculty on these points once school resumes in the fall.
I learned there is a real need for assistance on procuring sheet plastic. They would appreciate help with getting materials
donated and/or at a discount. I let them know that our group may very well be able to help. All in all, it was a great meeting and
hopefully it will be a start to establishing regular contact. Shown are some photos I took during the visit. The person I met with,
Philip Soderlind, is the shop supervisor where the machine was installed. xWorkshop at UCLA
Juliet Goff (Kal Plastics)
and Philip Soderlind (UCLA)
with MAAC Thermoformer
UNIVERSITY NEWS
Letter from Los Angeles
Juliet Oehler Goff, President/CEO, Kal Plastics
Irecently had the pleasure of visiting UCLA Architecture and Urban Design to meet the thermoforming team who are currently
using a MAAC thermoformer made possible by the SPE Thermoforming Division matching grant program. The machine was
installed in the summer of 2008.
They are actively using the machine a great deal and they expressed their gratitude for the SPE grant program. I saw photos
of some of the work generated and encouraged them to submit parts for the competition at the next conference.
I also asked to get annual updates on the output by the students and copies of student reports and/or any technical papers that
could be published in Thermoforming Quarterly and possibly presented at future conferences. I will re-connect with the teaching
faculty on these points once school resumes in the fall.
I learned there is a real need for assistance on procuring sheet plastic. They would appreciate help with getting materials
donated and/or at a discount. I let them know that our group may very well be able to help. All in all, it was a great meeting and
hopefully it will be a start to establishing regular contact. Shown are some photos I took during the visit. The person I met with,
Philip Soderlind, is the shop supervisor where the machine was installed. xWorkshop at UCLA
Juliet Goff (Kal Plastics)
and Philip Soderlind (UCLA)
with MAAC Thermoformer
Decorative surface in PETG formed Detailed view of PETG part which Full-size of formed pieces on display
by UCLA School of Architecture and was painted after forming
Urban Design

SAVE THE
DATE!!
MILWAUKEE,
WISCONSIN
SEPTEMBER
18th – 21st, 2010
SIGN UP TODAY
FOR EXHIBITOR
SPACE.
Contact
Gwen Mathis,
Conference
Coordinator,
at
gmathis224@aol.com,
706.235.9298 (ph), or
706.295.4276 (fx).
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 27

28 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 29

2010
EDITORIAL
CALENDAR

Quarterly Deadlines for

Copy and Sponsorships

ALL FINAL COPY FOR
EDITORIAL APPROVAL

30-JAN Spring 15-APR Summer

31-JUL Fall 30-OCT Winter

Post-Conference Edition

All artwork to be sent in .eps
or .jpg format with minimum
300dpi resolution.

Become a
Thermoforming
Quarterly Sponsor
in 2011!

Additional sponsorship
opportunities will include
4-color, full page, and
1/2 page.

RESERVE YOUR PRIME
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Ex-Tech Plastics
847-829-8124
Lpichon@extechplastics.com

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30 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

How do you thermoform with
175*working tons, 260 tons
of maximum strength,
150 tons of coining force,
and virtually zero
deflection across the
entire mold area?
*54” x 54” forming area, actual
specs may vary by machine size
INNOVA TIONS IN THERMOFORMING TECHNOLOG Y
How do you thermoform with
175*working tons, 260 tons
of maximum strength,
150 tons of coining force,
and virtually zero
deflection across the
entire mold area?
*54” x 54” forming area, actual
specs may vary by machine size
INNOVA TIONS IN THERMOFORMING TECHNOLOG Y
Introducing
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reduced starting gauges, and
a wider process window gives
you the competitive edge.

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www.brown-machine.com
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Thermoforming QUArTerLY 31

Society ofPlastics
Engineers
7th European Thermoforming
Conference, Antwerp 2010:
Another highly successful event of the
Thermoforming Industry
What are the current trends in thermoforming
technology? How can intelligent technical solutions
be translated into higher productivity and decisive
competitive advantages, and which innovative
materials can help in this respect?
These were the key issues discussed at the 7th
European Thermoforming Conference, designed and
run by SPE – European Thermoforming Division,
which was held between 22nd and 24th April 2010 in
Antwerp, Belgium
……………………………………………………………………………………………………..
due to heavy atmospheric ash from the Iceland volcano
eruption, some 200 delegates including many of the key
players within the European Thermoforming Industry,
found their way to Antwerp, where they discussed various
technological aspects and future developments. This
year’s forum once more has been an interesting platform
for exchanging experiences with experts and business
partners alike.
The conference programme included a rich and varied
combination of well-researched presentations and highlycharged
discussions. The event concluded with a series of
expert presentations organised by a leading company in
the thermoforming sector.
In a competent and comprehensive way the presentations
covered the theme of the conference “All Facets of
Thermoforming”.
Following this theme, the General Session started with
the topic “Plastics and the World in 2030”, presented by
Dr. Wilfried Haensel from Plastics Europe. Dr. Haensel
highlighted the never-ending, amazing, dynamic evolution
of plastic, which makes plastic the material for the 21st
century.
A thin gauge session and a parallel heavy gauge session
developments, materials and market opportunities that
exist. Further presentations gave room for comprehensive
discussions around Industrial Design, environmental
challenges, the thermoforming process and trends.
Conference room
The Conference has been complemented by an informative
and comprehensive exhibition of relevant latest product
developments and services offered by a variety of leading
suppliers to the thermoforming industry.
This event was a major success and demonstrated
E.T.D.’s ability to pull together many of the engineers and
managers of the European thermoforming industry as
guest speakers to ensure lively debates and unrivalled
networking opportunities.
View of the Tabletop Display
Society ofPlastics
Engineers
7th European Thermoforming
Conference, Antwerp 2010:
Another highly successful event of the
Thermoforming Industry
What are the current trends in thermoforming
technology? How can intelligent technical solutions
be translated into higher productivity and decisive
competitive advantages, and which innovative
materials can help in this respect?
These were the key issues discussed at the 7th
European Thermoforming Conference, designed and
run by SPE – European Thermoforming Division,
which was held between 22nd and 24th April 2010 in
Antwerp, Belgium
……………………………………………………………………………………………………..
due to heavy atmospheric ash from the Iceland volcano
eruption, some 200 delegates including many of the key
players within the European Thermoforming Industry,
found their way to Antwerp, where they discussed various
technological aspects and future developments. This
year’s forum once more has been an interesting platform
for exchanging experiences with experts and business
partners alike.
The conference programme included a rich and varied
combination of well-researched presentations and highlycharged
discussions. The event concluded with a series of
expert presentations organised by a leading company in
the thermoforming sector.
In a competent and comprehensive way the presentations
covered the theme of the conference “All Facets of
Thermoforming”.
Following this theme, the General Session started with
the topic “Plastics and the World in 2030”, presented by
Dr. Wilfried Haensel from Plastics Europe. Dr. Haensel
highlighted the never-ending, amazing, dynamic evolution
of plastic, which makes plastic the material for the 21st
century.
A thin gauge session and a parallel heavy gauge session
developments, materials and market opportunities that
exist. Further presentations gave room for comprehensive
discussions around Industrial Design, environmental
challenges, the thermoforming process and trends.
Conference room
The Conference has been complemented by an informative
and comprehensive exhibition of relevant latest product
developments and services offered by a variety of leading
suppliers to the thermoforming industry.
This event was a major success and demonstrated
E.T.D.’s ability to pull together many of the engineers and
managers of the European thermoforming industry as
guest speakers to ensure lively debates and unrivalled
networking opportunities.
View of the Tabletop Display
offered the audience informed insights into new

With special thanks to our Conference Sponsors!

32 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Society ofPlastics
Engineers
3rd European Thermoforming
Parts Competition at SPE’s
Thermoforming Conference, April 2010
………………………………………………………………………………..
thermoformed parts from European and American
producers. Three winners were selected by the Jury in
both Heavy and Thin Gauge applications.
Heavy Gauge winners were:
….“Round Bailer Door” made by
‘Vitalo Industries’, Belgium.
The complete design and development was
made by Vitalo, made of two formed ABS parts
(inner-and outer skin) bonded together with glue
by a robot system in combination with a plasma
treatment.
….“Spot light housing” made by
‘AB Formplast’, Sweden.
……………………………………………………………………
requiring tooling with several moveable
parts. Parts show an even wall thickness
distribution and a nice surface. This part was
realized in thermoforming “against the odds”.
….“Window for electric bicycle” made by ‘Greijn
Form Technics’, The Netherlands.
This fantastic drape forming is done with a perfect
surface quality enabling plastics to be used
instead of a traditional and a more heavy glass
solution.
Round Bailer Door
Spot light housing
K’ exhibition 2010
27 October – 3 November 2010 – Düsseldorf, Germany
SPE Stand: Hall 11 – E21
SPE Reception on Thursday 28 October at K’ show.
All members are welcome to join this get-together.
Society ofPlastics
Engineers
3rd European Thermoforming
Parts Competition at SPE’s
Thermoforming Conference, April 2010
………………………………………………………………………………..
thermoformed parts from European and American
producers. Three winners were selected by the Jury in
both Heavy and Thin Gauge applications.
Heavy Gauge winners were:
….“Round Bailer Door” made by
‘Vitalo Industries’, Belgium.
The complete design and development was
made by Vitalo, made of two formed ABS parts
(inner-and outer skin) bonded together with glue
by a robot system in combination with a plasma
treatment.
….“Spot light housing” made by
‘AB Formplast’, Sweden.
……………………………………………………………………
requiring tooling with several moveable
parts. Parts show an even wall thickness
distribution and a nice surface. This part was
realized in thermoforming “against the odds”.
….“Window for electric bicycle” made by ‘Greijn
Form Technics’, The Netherlands.
This fantastic drape forming is done with a perfect
surface quality enabling plastics to be used
instead of a traditional and a more heavy glass
solution.
Round Bailer Door
Spot light housing
K’ exhibition 2010
27 October – 3 November 2010 – Düsseldorf, Germany
SPE Stand: Hall 11 – E21
SPE Reception on Thursday 28 October at K’ show.
All members are welcome to join this get-together.
Window for electric bicycle

(continued on next page)

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 33

Society ofPlastics
Engineers
…………………………………………………………………………………………….
3 different categories (Medical, Electronic and Food
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………
as there were many very sophisticated interesting smart
complicated packages from which we had to pick just 1
from its category.
Thin Gauge winners were:
….In Medical applications the winner was
“Universal Blister for Knee Prothesis”
produced by ’Cartolux Thiers’, France.
This universal blister for knee produced from
PETG is easy to use mainly because of its screw
thread. It can be adjusted to a large range of
prothesis size without any additional insert. One
…………………………………………………………………………………………
was to ensure the geometry of the cover after
cutting, and also for the retainer to ensure an easy
unmolding despite of big undercuts in the screw
thread.
….In Electronic applications the winner
was ”Electronic Card Reader” produced
by ’Protective Pack, Syst/Plastistique’, UK.
This ingenious ‘all in one’ pack from recycled
HDPE replaces the need for a complex corrugated
die cut insert arrangement within the existing pack.
Final product is enclosed it has a 360 degree
protective wrap with shock absorption features
………………………………………………………………………………..
is also reduced considerably ensuring a sizeable
reduction in vehicle movements for shipping –
estimated reduction of one trailer load per month.
….In Food application the winner was ”Soup in the
Air Cup” produced by ’Faerch Plast’, Denmark.
The challenge of this special CPET soup tray was
to create a packaging that could keep the soup
in the tray which at the same time could equalize
the air pressure in the airplane. It should also
be able to let the steam out when heated in 20
minutes at 185°C in the air and it should be easy
to handle for the cabin crew when serving. The
grooves around the top edge are designed to let
the pressure or steam out and keep the soup in.
Universal Blister for Knee Prothesis
Electronic Card Reader
Society ofPlastics
Engineers
…………………………………………………………………………………………….
3 different categories (Medical, Electronic and Food
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………
as there were many very sophisticated interesting smart
complicated packages from which we had to pick just 1
from its category.
Thin Gauge winners were:
….In Medical applications the winner was
“Universal Blister for Knee Prothesis”
produced by ’Cartolux Thiers’, France.
This universal blister for knee produced from
PETG is easy to use mainly because of its screw
thread. It can be adjusted to a large range of
prothesis size without any additional insert. One
…………………………………………………………………………………………
was to ensure the geometry of the cover after
cutting, and also for the retainer to ensure an easy
unmolding despite of big undercuts in the screw
thread.
….In Electronic applications the winner
was ”Electronic Card Reader” produced
by ’Protective Pack, Syst/Plastistique’, UK.
This ingenious ‘all in one’ pack from recycled
HDPE replaces the need for a complex corrugated
die cut insert arrangement within the existing pack.
Final product is enclosed it has a 360 degree
protective wrap with shock absorption features
………………………………………………………………………………..
is also reduced considerably ensuring a sizeable
reduction in vehicle movements for shipping –
estimated reduction of one trailer load per month.
….In Food application the winner was ”Soup in the
Air Cup” produced by ’Faerch Plast’, Denmark.
The challenge of this special CPET soup tray was
to create a packaging that could keep the soup
in the tray which at the same time could equalize
the air pressure in the airplane. It should also
be able to let the steam out when heated in 20
minutes at 185°C in the air and it should be easy
to handle for the cabin crew when serving. The
grooves around the top edge are designed to let
the pressure or steam out and keep the soup in.
Universal Blister for Knee Prothesis
Electronic Card Reader
Soup in the Air Cup

34 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Thermoformer of the Year 2011
The Awards Committee is now accepting nominations for the 2011 THERMOFORMER OF THE
YEAR. Please help us by identifying worthy candidates. This prestigious honor will be awarded to

a member of our industry who has made a significant contribution to the thermoforming industry

in a technical, educational, or managerial aspect of thermoforming. Nominees will be evaluated
and voted on by the Thermoforming Board of Directors at the Winter 2011 meeting. The deadline
for submitting nominations is December 1st, 2010. Please complete the form below and include
all biographical information.

Person Nominated: ____________________________________ Title: ___________________

Firm or Institution______________________________________________________________

Street Address: ____________________________ City, State, Zip: ______________________

Telephone: _______________ Fax: _________________ E-mail: ________________________

Biographical Information:

•
Nominee’s Experience in the Thermoforming Industry.
•
Nominee’s Education (include degrees, year granted, name and location of university)
•
Prior corporate or academic affiliations (include company and/or institutions, title, and
approximate dates of affiliations)
•
Professional society affiliations
•
Professional honors and awards.
•
Publications and patents (please attach list).
•
Evaluation of the effect of this individual’s achievement on technology and progress of
the plastics industry. (To support nomination, attach substantial documentation of these
achievements.)
•
Other significant accomplishments in the field of plastics.
Individual Submitting Nomination: _______________________ Title: _____________________

Firm or Institution______________________________________________________________

Street Address: ____________________________ City, State, Zip: ______________________

Telephone: _______________ Fax: _________________ E-mail: ________________________

Signature: ___________________________________________ Date: ____________________

(ALL NOMINATIONS MUST BE SIGNED)

Please submit all nominations to: Juliet Goff,
Kal Plastics, 2050 East 48th Street,
Vernon, CA 90058-2022
Phone 323.581.6194, ext. 223 or email at: Juliet@kal-plastics.com

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 35

September 17 – 20, 2011

2011Welcome Back to Chicago!
20th Annual Thermoforming Conf erence
For Reservations: 1-800-468-3571
or 847-303-4100
Request SPE Room Rate of $159.00
Chairman Heavy Gauge Technical Chairman
®
BEING PREPARED
to Meet Future Opportunities
James Alongi
MAAC Machinery
630-665-1700
jalongi@maacmachinery.com

Parts Competition
Bret Joslyn
Joslyn Manufacturing
330-467-8111
bret@joslyn-mfg.com

Technical Chairman
Paul Alongi
MAAC Machinery
630-665-1700
paul@maacsales.com

Jay Waddell
Plastics Concepts & Innovations
843-971-7833
jwaddell@plasticoncepts.com

Roll Fed Technical Chairman
Mark Strachan
Global Thermoform Training, Inc.
754-224-7513
mark@global-tti.com

Conference Coordinator
Gwen S. Mathis
706-235-9298
gmathis224@aol.com

36 Thermoforming QUArTerLY
SAVE THE DATE!!
www.thermoformingdivision.com
Schaumburg, Illinois (20 minutes from O’Hare Airport)

Executive
Committee

2010 – 2012

CHAIR

Ken Griep
Portage Casting & Mold
2901 Portage Road
Portage, WI 53901
(608) 742-7137
Fax (608) 742-2199
ken@pcmwi.com

CHAIR ELECT

Phil Barhouse
Spartech Packaging Technologies
100 Creative Way, PO Box 128
Ripon, WI 54971
(920) 748-1119
Fax (920) 748-9466
phil.barhouse@spartech.com

TREASURER

James Alongi
MAAC Machinery
590 Tower Blvd.
Carol Stream, IL 60188
(630) 665-1700
Fax (630) 665-7799
jalongi@maacmachinery.com

SECRETARY

Mike Sirotnak
Solar Products
228 Wanaque Avenue
Pompton Lakes, NJ 07442
(973) 248-9370
Fax (973) 835-7856
msirotnak@solarproducts.com

COUNCILOR WITH TERM
ENDING ANTEC 2010

Roger Kipp
McClarin Plastics
P. O. Box 486, 15 Industrial Drive
Hanover, PA 17331
(717) 637-2241 x4003
Fax (717) 637-4811
rkipp@mcclarinplastics.com

PRIOR CHAIR

Brian Ray
Ray Products
1700 Chablis Avenue
Ontario, CA 91761
(909) 390-9906, Ext. 216
Fax (909) 390-9984
brianr@rayplastics.com

2010 – 2012 THERMOFORMING DIVISION ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

Thermoforming QUArTerLY 37
UPCOMING CONFERENCES
MILWAUKEE, WI – SEPT. 18 – 21, 2010
SCHAUMBURG, IL – SEPT. 17 – 20, 2011
Chair
Ken Griep
Chair Elect
Phil Barhouse
Finance
Bob Porsche
Technical Committees
Processing
Walt Speck
Materials
Roger Jean
Machinery
Don Kruschke
Secretary
Mike Sirotnak
Nominating
Dennis Northrop
Publications /
Advertising
Laura Pichon
Newsletter / Technical
Editor
Conor Carlin
OPCOM
Phil Barhouse
Treasurer
James Alongi
AARC
Rich Freeman
Student Programs
Brian Winton
Councilor
Roger Kipp
Prior Chair
Brian Ray
2010 Conference
Milwaukee
Clarissa Schroeder
Antec
Brian Winton
Membership
Haydn Forward
Marketing
Don Kruschke
Recognition
Juliet Goff
Web Site
Rich Freeman
Green Committee
Steve Hasselbach
2011 Conference
Schaumburg, IL
James Alongi
Conference Coordinator
Consultant
Gwen Mathis

From the Editor

If you are an educator, student or advisor in a college or university with a plastics program,
we want to hear from you! The SPE Thermoforming Division has a long and rich tradition of
working with academic partners. From scholarships and grants to workforce development
programs, the division seeks to promote a stronger bond between industry and academia.

Thermoforming Quarterly is proud to publish news and stories related to the science and
business of thermoforming:

• New materials development
• New applications
• Innovative technologies
• Industry partnerships
• New or expanding laboratory facilities
• Endowments
We are also interested in hearing from our members and colleagues around the world. If
your school or institution has an international partner, please invite them to submit relevant
content. We publish press releases, student essays, photos and technical papers. If you
would like to arrange an interview, please contact Ken Griep, Academic Programs, at:

ken@pcmwi.com or 608.742.7137

ISO 9001:2000
38 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

Board of Directors
MACHINERY
COMMITTEE
James Alongi
MAAC Machinery
590 Tower Blvd.
Carol Stream, IL 60188
T: 630.665.1700
F: 630.665.7799
jalongi@maacmachinery.com
Roger Fox
The Foxmor Group
373 S. Country Farm Road
Suite 202
Wheaton, IL 60187
T: 630.653.2200
F: 630.653.1474
rfox@foxmor.com
Hal Gilham
Productive Plastics, Inc.
103 West Park Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08045
T: 856.778.4300
F: 856.234.3310
halg@productiveplastics.com
Bill Kent
Brown Machine
330 North Ross Street
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.7741
F: 989.435.2821
bill.kent@brown-machine.com
Don Kruschke (Chair)
Thermoforming Machinery
& Equipment
31875 Solon Road
Solon, OH 44139
T: 440.498.4000
F: 440.498.4001
donk@allthingsthermoforming.com
Brian Winton
Modern Machinery
PO Box 423
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.9071
F: 989.435.3940
bwinton@modernmachineinc.com
MATERIALS
COMMITTEE
Jim Armor
Armor & Associates
16181 Santa Barbara Lane
Huntington Beach, CA 92649
T: 714.846.7000
F: 714.846.7001
jimarmor@aol.com
Phil Barhouse
Spartech Packaging
Technologies
100 Creative Way
PO Box 128
Ripon, WI 54971
T: 920.748.1119
F: 920.748.9466
phil.barhouse@spartech.com
Juliet Goff
Kal Plastics, Inc.
2050 East 48th Street
Vernon, CA 90058-2022
T: 323.581.6194
Juliet@kal-plastics.com
Donald Hylton
McConnell Company
646 Holyfield Highway
Fairburn, GA 30213
T: 678.772.5008
don@thermoforming.com
Roger P. Jean (Chair)
Rowmark/PMC
PO Box 1605
2040 Industrial Drive
Findlay, OH 45840
T: 567.208.9758
rjean@rowmark.com
Dennis Northrop
Soliant LLC
1872 Highway 9 Bypass West
Lancaster, SC 29720
T: 219.688.9248
dnorthrop@paintfilm.com
Laura Pichon
Ex-Tech Plastics
PO Box 576
11413 Burlington Road
Richmond, IL 60071
T: 847.829.8124
F: 815.678.4248
lpichon@extechplastics.com
Clarissa Schroeder
Invista S.A.R.L
1551 Sha Lane
Spartanburg, SC 29307
T: 864.579.5047
F: 864.579.5288
Clarissa.Schroeder@invista.com
Robert G. Porsche
General Plastics
2609 West Mill Road
Milwaukee, WI 53209
T: 414.351.1000
F: 414.351.1284
bob@genplas.com
Walt Speck (Chair)
Speck Plastics, Inc.
PO Box 421
Nazareth, PA 18064
T: 610.759.1807
F: 610.759.3916
wspeck@speckplastics.com
Mark Strachan
Global Thermoforming
Technologies
1550 SW 24th Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
T: 754.224.7513
globalmarks@hotmail.com
Jay Waddell
Plastics Concepts & Innovations
1127 Queensborough Road
Suite 102
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
T: 843.971.7833
F: 843.216.6151
jwaddell@plasticoncepts.com
PROCESSING
COMMITTEE
Art Buckel
McConnell Company
3452 Bayonne Drive
San Diego, CA 92109
T: 858.273.9620
F: 858.273.6837
artbuckel@thermoforming.com
Lola Carere
Thermopro
1600 Cross Point Way
Suite D
Duluth, GA 30097
T: 678.957.3220
F: 678.475.1747
lcarere@thermopro.com
Haydn Forward
Specialty Manufacturing Co.
6790 Nancy Ridge Road
San Diego, CA 92121
T: 858.450.1591
F: 858.450.0400
hforward@smi-mfg.com
Richard Freeman
Freetech Plastics
2211 Warm Springs Court
Fremont, CA 94539
T: 510.651.9996
F: 510.651.9917
rfree@freetechplastics.com
Ken Griep
Portage Casting & Mold
2901 Portage Road
Portage, WI 53901
T: 608.742.7137
F: 608.742.2199
ken@pcmwi.com
Steve Hasselbach
CMI Plastics
222 Pepsi Way
Ayden, NC 28416
T: 252.746.2171
F: 252.746.2172
steve@cmiplastics.com
Bret Joslyn
Joslyn Manufacturing
9400 Valley View Road
Macedonia, OH 44056
T: 330.467.8111
F: 330.467.6574
bret@joslyn-mfg.com
Stephen Murrill
Profile Plastics
65 S. Waukegan
Lake Bluff, IL 60044
T: 847.604.5100 x29
F: 847.604.8030
smurrill@thermoform.com
Board of Directors
MACHINERY
COMMITTEE
James Alongi
MAAC Machinery
590 Tower Blvd.
Carol Stream, IL 60188
T: 630.665.1700
F: 630.665.7799
jalongi@maacmachinery.com
Roger Fox
The Foxmor Group
373 S. Country Farm Road
Suite 202
Wheaton, IL 60187
T: 630.653.2200
F: 630.653.1474
rfox@foxmor.com
Hal Gilham
Productive Plastics, Inc.
103 West Park Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08045
T: 856.778.4300
F: 856.234.3310
halg@productiveplastics.com
Bill Kent
Brown Machine
330 North Ross Street
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.7741
F: 989.435.2821
bill.kent@brown-machine.com
Don Kruschke (Chair)
Thermoforming Machinery
& Equipment
31875 Solon Road
Solon, OH 44139
T: 440.498.4000
F: 440.498.4001
donk@allthingsthermoforming.com
Brian Winton
Modern Machinery
PO Box 423
Beaverton, MI 48612
T: 989.435.9071
F: 989.435.3940
bwinton@modernmachineinc.com
MATERIALS
COMMITTEE
Jim Armor
Armor & Associates
16181 Santa Barbara Lane
Huntington Beach, CA 92649
T: 714.846.7000
F: 714.846.7001
jimarmor@aol.com
Phil Barhouse
Spartech Packaging
Technologies
100 Creative Way
PO Box 128
Ripon, WI 54971
T: 920.748.1119
F: 920.748.9466
phil.barhouse@spartech.com
Juliet Goff
Kal Plastics, Inc.
2050 East 48th Street
Vernon, CA 90058-2022
T: 323.581.6194
Juliet@kal-plastics.com
Donald Hylton
McConnell Company
646 Holyfield Highway
Fairburn, GA 30213
T: 678.772.5008
don@thermoforming.com
Roger P. Jean (Chair)
Rowmark/PMC
PO Box 1605
2040 Industrial Drive
Findlay, OH 45840
T: 567.208.9758
rjean@rowmark.com
Dennis Northrop
Soliant LLC
1872 Highway 9 Bypass West
Lancaster, SC 29720
T: 219.688.9248
dnorthrop@paintfilm.com
Laura Pichon
Ex-Tech Plastics
PO Box 576
11413 Burlington Road
Richmond, IL 60071
T: 847.829.8124
F: 815.678.4248
lpichon@extechplastics.com
Clarissa Schroeder
Invista S.A.R.L
1551 Sha Lane
Spartanburg, SC 29307
T: 864.579.5047
F: 864.579.5288
Clarissa.Schroeder@invista.com
Robert G. Porsche
General Plastics
2609 West Mill Road
Milwaukee, WI 53209
T: 414.351.1000
F: 414.351.1284
bob@genplas.com
Walt Speck (Chair)
Speck Plastics, Inc.
PO Box 421
Nazareth, PA 18064
T: 610.759.1807
F: 610.759.3916
wspeck@speckplastics.com
Mark Strachan
Global Thermoforming
Technologies
1550 SW 24th Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
T: 754.224.7513
globalmarks@hotmail.com
Jay Waddell
Plastics Concepts & Innovations
1127 Queensborough Road
Suite 102
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
T: 843.971.7833
F: 843.216.6151
jwaddell@plasticoncepts.com
PROCESSING
COMMITTEE
Art Buckel
McConnell Company
3452 Bayonne Drive
San Diego, CA 92109
T: 858.273.9620
F: 858.273.6837
artbuckel@thermoforming.com
Lola Carere
Thermopro
1600 Cross Point Way
Suite D
Duluth, GA 30097
T: 678.957.3220
F: 678.475.1747
lcarere@thermopro.com
Haydn Forward
Specialty Manufacturing Co.
6790 Nancy Ridge Road
San Diego, CA 92121
T: 858.450.1591
F: 858.450.0400
hforward@smi-mfg.com
Richard Freeman
Freetech Plastics
2211 Warm Springs Court
Fremont, CA 94539
T: 510.651.9996
F: 510.651.9917
rfree@freetechplastics.com
Ken Griep
Portage Casting & Mold
2901 Portage Road
Portage, WI 53901
T: 608.742.7137
F: 608.742.2199
ken@pcmwi.com
Steve Hasselbach
CMI Plastics
222 Pepsi Way
Ayden, NC 28416
T: 252.746.2171
F: 252.746.2172
steve@cmiplastics.com
Bret Joslyn
Joslyn Manufacturing
9400 Valley View Road
Macedonia, OH 44056
T: 330.467.8111
F: 330.467.6574
bret@joslyn-mfg.com
Stephen Murrill
Profile Plastics
65 S. Waukegan
Lake Bluff, IL 60044
T: 847.604.5100 x29
F: 847.604.8030
smurrill@thermoform.com
Thermoforming QUArTerLY 39

nAccess to industry knowledge from one central location: www.thermoformingdivision.com.
nSubscription to Thermoforming Quarterly, voted “Publication of the Year” by SPE National.
nExposure to new ideas and trends from across the globe
nNew and innovative part design at the Parts Competition.
nOpen dialogue with the entire industry at the annual conference.
nDiscounts, discounts, discounts on books, seminars and conferences.
nFor managers: workshops and presentations tailored specifically to the needs of your operators.
nFor operators: workshops and presentations that will send you home with new tools to improve your performance, make your job easier and help the
company’s bottom line.
Join D25 toDay!
nAccess to industry knowledge from one central location: www.thermoformingdivision.com.
nSubscription to Thermoforming Quarterly, voted “Publication of the Year” by SPE National.
nExposure to new ideas and trends from across the globe
nNew and innovative part design at the Parts Competition.
nOpen dialogue with the entire industry at the annual conference.
nDiscounts, discounts, discounts on books, seminars and conferences.
nFor managers: workshops and presentations tailored specifically to the needs of your operators.
nFor operators: workshops and presentations that will send you home with new tools to improve your performance, make your job easier and help the
company’s bottom line.
Join D25 toDay!
Thermoforming
Quarterly®
THIRD QUARTER 2010
VOLUME 29 n NUMBER 3
Sponsor Index These sponsors enable us to publish Thermoforming Quarterly
n Advanced Thermforming ……38
n Allen ……………………………38
n Brown Machine ……………….31
n CMG ……………………………37
n CMT Materials ………………..25
n Future Mold …………………..38
n GN Plastics ……………………27
n GPEC 2011 ……………………30
n Kiefel …………………………..38
n KMT …………………………….30
n Kydex ………Inside Front Cover
n MAAC Machinery ……………..30
n McClarin Plastics ……………..27
n Mold-Tech ……………………..20
n Nova Chemicals ……Back Cover
n PCI ……………………………..38
n PMC ………… Inside Back Cover
n Portage Casting & Mold ……..27
n Primex Plastics ……………….21
n Profile Plastics Corp. ………..38
n PTi ………………………………13
n Ray Products ………………….38
n Solar Products ………………..27
n Tempco ………………………..40
n Thermoforming Machinery &

Equipment Inc. …………….20
n Thermwood……………………23
n TPS …………………………….23
n Zed Industries ………………..38

Thermoforming Division Membership Benefits

40 Thermoforming QUArTerLY

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